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Job Satisfaction

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NEWS
March 20, 2011
Rejoice! More people quit their jobs in December than were laid off or fired. That's nearly two million people who voluntarily left offices, laboratories, and factories that may or may not have been deemed "the best place to work. " Nevertheless, we should be cheered by that turn of events because a rising "quits rate," as the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics calls it, means more people are willing or able to change jobs. The peak level of quits was 3.2 million in November 2006 - a year before the recession began.
NEWS
July 25, 2011
By David Polk Today's work environment is a tough one. With nearly 10 percent of Americans looking for a job, employers have the pick of the litter and can get away with demanding more for less. This can mean long workdays, less compensation, and sometimes poor working conditions. But while employers and managers can take advantage of employees in difficult times like these, they can also take some relatively easy steps to keep them happier. From conducting an annual nationwide survey on professionalism among entry-level employees, as well as spending a lot of time studying workplaces in general, I know employees have a variety of motivations.
NEWS
February 3, 1986
In response to Claude Lewis' Jan. 25 column "A painful tangle with the medical care system": It is true, indeed, that people these days are forced to "choose an insurance company" rather than choosing the finest and most convenient health care available. The effects of this bureaucratic nonsense extend far beyond the medical treatment for illness, however. For instance, I have just changed employment, giving up one position voluntarily for a new job with greater potential. During my search for new employment, I was introduced to some of the various health insurance coverages available as part of the benefits packages of different firms.
NEWS
January 11, 1986
The Dec. 21 editorial "Costly sick-leave abuse" makes a strong statement for curbing the excess sick leave practices of municipal employees. I agree with your final statement that "the Goode administration should have constructive proposals for sick-leave reform on the bargaining table. " However, some of those "constructive proposals" had better deal with the system of management-union relations that permitted those excesses to occur in the first place. Many of the reasons for high levels of sick-leave abuse are found in this system.
LIVING
April 25, 1995 | By Lini S. Kadaba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
How does the company picnic, a still popular morale booster, sweeten the bottom line? More and more, managers of employee services have to answer such questions to win corporate support for everything from the softball league to diversity training. That message was hammered at during the National Employee Services and Recreation Association (NESRA) conference, which concluded Sunday at the Philadelphia Marriott. "We've got to define and legitimize what we're doing for any bottom line," Arthur Anderson, chairman of the sociology department at Connecticut's Fairfield University, said during his keynote address, "Capitalizing on Changing Workplace Values.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1999 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer Contributing were the Fort Worth Star-Telegram and the Associated Press
If you're young, take advantage of it. Young people who are thinking of starting their own businesses should just go out and do it. That's the advice of Barrett Hazeltine, professor emeritus of engineering at Brown University. Hazeltine, interviewed in Fast Company magazine, said the best time to begin a company is when you're still young. "You don't have a spouse," he said. "You don't have a mortgage. Failure at 40 can be a huge blow; but at 25, you go to the beach for a few days, and it's all better.
NEWS
March 3, 1991 | By JOHN GOOD
Philadelphia will elect a new mayor this year. What are the challenges and how should he or she respond to them? The Editorial Board posed these questions to a variety of people. Over the months ahead, we will be presenting their advice. I have a fantasy about how Philadelphia's next mayor handles labor relations. After listening to the unions' demands for wage and benefit increases, the mayor responds, "Your demands are reasonable, but I think you should be asking for more.
NEWS
July 12, 1990 | By Bill Miller, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fresh air. After repairing locomotives in a sweltering, stuffy factory for years, Thomas M. Roselli wanted to work outdoors, away from the diesel fumes. He moved from the factory and onto the streets, becoming an officer with the Philadelphia Police Department. On patrol or in the office, in 40 years on the force, Roselli has found police work anything but confining. Chief Inspector Thomas M. Roselli is a testimonial to job satisfaction. Yesterday, more than 200 police veterans, active and retired, gathered for a party to toast and roast Roselli on his anniversary and career.
NEWS
August 21, 1988 | By Henry Klein, Special to The Inquirer
I have been a medical/technical secretary for over 10 years in a hospital/ university. I work for several doctors and use a word processor extensively to type manuscripts, letters, etc. I have an excellent knowledge of medical terminology. I also use three kinds of computers. Although I earn $21,000, I have been very bored with my job and its lack of diversity. In addition, the stigma of being "just a secretary" is beginning to bother me. I don't want to change jobs right now because of my job security, seniority and benefits, which have taken me years to build.
LIVING
November 2, 1993 | By Lona O'Connor, FOR THE INQUIRER
There are a lot of reasons why people aren't able to finish their jobs in the time allotted. Sometimes there really is too much work to do in a normal day. As companies cut back, fewer people are doing more work; some are working harder than they ever did before. But even in that context - or maybe especially in that context - perfectionists are working harder than ever. They are making severe demands on themselves, and setting themselves up for a bad case of perfectionist stress, which is worse than plain old stress, because a perfectionist believes the job can never be done "right enough.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 25, 2011
By David Polk Today's work environment is a tough one. With nearly 10 percent of Americans looking for a job, employers have the pick of the litter and can get away with demanding more for less. This can mean long workdays, less compensation, and sometimes poor working conditions. But while employers and managers can take advantage of employees in difficult times like these, they can also take some relatively easy steps to keep them happier. From conducting an annual nationwide survey on professionalism among entry-level employees, as well as spending a lot of time studying workplaces in general, I know employees have a variety of motivations.
NEWS
March 20, 2011
Rejoice! More people quit their jobs in December than were laid off or fired. That's nearly two million people who voluntarily left offices, laboratories, and factories that may or may not have been deemed "the best place to work. " Nevertheless, we should be cheered by that turn of events because a rising "quits rate," as the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics calls it, means more people are willing or able to change jobs. The peak level of quits was 3.2 million in November 2006 - a year before the recession began.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1999 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer Contributing were the Fort Worth Star-Telegram and the Associated Press
If you're young, take advantage of it. Young people who are thinking of starting their own businesses should just go out and do it. That's the advice of Barrett Hazeltine, professor emeritus of engineering at Brown University. Hazeltine, interviewed in Fast Company magazine, said the best time to begin a company is when you're still young. "You don't have a spouse," he said. "You don't have a mortgage. Failure at 40 can be a huge blow; but at 25, you go to the beach for a few days, and it's all better.
LIVING
April 25, 1995 | By Lini S. Kadaba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
How does the company picnic, a still popular morale booster, sweeten the bottom line? More and more, managers of employee services have to answer such questions to win corporate support for everything from the softball league to diversity training. That message was hammered at during the National Employee Services and Recreation Association (NESRA) conference, which concluded Sunday at the Philadelphia Marriott. "We've got to define and legitimize what we're doing for any bottom line," Arthur Anderson, chairman of the sociology department at Connecticut's Fairfield University, said during his keynote address, "Capitalizing on Changing Workplace Values.
LIVING
November 2, 1993 | By Lona O'Connor, FOR THE INQUIRER
There are a lot of reasons why people aren't able to finish their jobs in the time allotted. Sometimes there really is too much work to do in a normal day. As companies cut back, fewer people are doing more work; some are working harder than they ever did before. But even in that context - or maybe especially in that context - perfectionists are working harder than ever. They are making severe demands on themselves, and setting themselves up for a bad case of perfectionist stress, which is worse than plain old stress, because a perfectionist believes the job can never be done "right enough.
NEWS
March 3, 1991 | By JOHN GOOD
Philadelphia will elect a new mayor this year. What are the challenges and how should he or she respond to them? The Editorial Board posed these questions to a variety of people. Over the months ahead, we will be presenting their advice. I have a fantasy about how Philadelphia's next mayor handles labor relations. After listening to the unions' demands for wage and benefit increases, the mayor responds, "Your demands are reasonable, but I think you should be asking for more.
NEWS
July 12, 1990 | By Bill Miller, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fresh air. After repairing locomotives in a sweltering, stuffy factory for years, Thomas M. Roselli wanted to work outdoors, away from the diesel fumes. He moved from the factory and onto the streets, becoming an officer with the Philadelphia Police Department. On patrol or in the office, in 40 years on the force, Roselli has found police work anything but confining. Chief Inspector Thomas M. Roselli is a testimonial to job satisfaction. Yesterday, more than 200 police veterans, active and retired, gathered for a party to toast and roast Roselli on his anniversary and career.
NEWS
August 21, 1988 | By Henry Klein, Special to The Inquirer
I have been a medical/technical secretary for over 10 years in a hospital/ university. I work for several doctors and use a word processor extensively to type manuscripts, letters, etc. I have an excellent knowledge of medical terminology. I also use three kinds of computers. Although I earn $21,000, I have been very bored with my job and its lack of diversity. In addition, the stigma of being "just a secretary" is beginning to bother me. I don't want to change jobs right now because of my job security, seniority and benefits, which have taken me years to build.
NEWS
February 3, 1986
In response to Claude Lewis' Jan. 25 column "A painful tangle with the medical care system": It is true, indeed, that people these days are forced to "choose an insurance company" rather than choosing the finest and most convenient health care available. The effects of this bureaucratic nonsense extend far beyond the medical treatment for illness, however. For instance, I have just changed employment, giving up one position voluntarily for a new job with greater potential. During my search for new employment, I was introduced to some of the various health insurance coverages available as part of the benefits packages of different firms.
NEWS
January 11, 1986
The Dec. 21 editorial "Costly sick-leave abuse" makes a strong statement for curbing the excess sick leave practices of municipal employees. I agree with your final statement that "the Goode administration should have constructive proposals for sick-leave reform on the bargaining table. " However, some of those "constructive proposals" had better deal with the system of management-union relations that permitted those excesses to occur in the first place. Many of the reasons for high levels of sick-leave abuse are found in this system.
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