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Job Security

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NEWS
September 10, 2012 | Associated Press
CHICAGO - The Chicago Teachers Union says its members will go on strike Monday for the first time in 25 years. The union says contract talks with the district failed late Sunday night over issues including benefits and job security. "We will be on the (picket) line," Chicago Teachers Union president Karen Lewis said, calling it a difficult decision and one the union hoped could be avoided. More than 26,000 teachers and support staff are expected to hit the picket lines Monday morning, while the school district and parents make plans for keeping students safe and occupied during the day. School board president David Vitale announced a short time earlier that talks had broken off despite the school board offering what he called a fair and responsible contract that would cover four years and cost the city $400 million.
SPORTS
August 28, 2000 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
The Phillies won't arrive in Los Angeles until Thursday night. Terry Francona understands he might already be on shaky ground. The team is well on its way to a fourth consecutive losing season on his watch. The manager is heartily booed whenever he sticks his head out of the dugout. And recent statements from Ed Wade seem to indicate that the general manager is hedging on the unconditional support he offered earlier this season. "Eddie and I have had a real good relationship, both personally and professionally," a relaxed Francona said yesterday after the Phillies' thrilling win over the Giants at Veterans Stadium.
SPORTS
May 27, 1991 | By Ray Parrillo, Inquirer Staff Writer
A recent survey concluded that lefthanders don't live as long as righthanders, that heaven opens its pearly gates to lefties nine years sooner than righties on the average. Obviously, the survey ignored major-league baseball. In baseball, lefthanded pitchers never die. They just are reincarnated in different uniforms. No matter how old they are, no matter how many miles an hour they've lost from their fastballs, no matter how many times they've been discarded or battered around, lefthanded pitchers keep getting recycled like aluminum cans.
SPORTS
March 5, 2013 | By David Murphy, Daily News Staff Writer
FORT MYERS, Fla. - It was the kind of day that is known to occur once or twice this time of year. The flags in centerfield were pointing out of the ballpark and the temperature was struggling to stay in the 50s and the guys on the mound were no longer pitching like they were ahead of the hitters. Up and down the Gulf Coast of Florida, long fly balls screamed out of stadiums like tracers on an overcast sky. Back in Clearwater, Domonic Brown and Ryan Howard both launched pitches into the heart of the jet stream, the latter's home run looking for an instant like it might drop a surprise on the hood of one of the unwitting blue hairs who were matriculating their vehicles up the highway that runs behind the rightfield wall.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2012 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER real estate WRITER
Three years into economic recovery, African Americans, Latinos, and Asians continue to lag whites in employment and job security, according to a study by the Center for American Progress, a liberal think-tank in Washington. In a teleconference Thursday cosponsored by the center, the National Council of La Raza, and the National Urban League, Christian E. Weller, a study author, said research found that the unemployment rate of African Americans (15.4 percent) was typically twice as high as that of white Americans, while the Latino unemployment rate was about 50 percent greater.
NEWS
September 1, 1995
Poor Melvin Thomas. He's the SEPTA employee who was suspended for his role as the high-on-cocaine operator of a Market-Frankford El train that crashed in 1990, killing four. But to howls from the public, he won $111,000 in back pay because an arbitrator (and the National Transportation Safety Board) blamed the crash on mechanical failure. Well, Mr. Thomas - now a SEPTA cashier who must undergo drug testing - has been suspended without pay again. The transit agency won't say if it was drug- related, but the news has lots of folks pretty hot. Folks like Kimberly S. D'Andrea, 29, who manages the fur department at Saks Fifth Avenue in Bala Cynwyd.
SPORTS
March 10, 1988 | By DICK WEISS, Daily News Sports Writer
Someone, please, take P.J. Carlesimo out to dinner at Il Vagabondo, his favorite Italian restaurant, when he crosses the river to New York City this weekend for the Big East Conference Tournament. Then, give him a pat on the back and order a bottle of the best wine in the house. Surely he deserves it for what he has done at Seton Hall this season - and for what he has had to endure. Carlesimo has taken a team of dead-end kids and coached them to a 20-11 record, the school's first 20-win basketball season since 1956.
NEWS
December 13, 1995 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Faced by an expiring contract and fruitless negotiations, union officials representing Lukens Inc. steelworkers went public yesterday with demands for job security and a seat on the company's board. "We still feel optimistic we are going to get a contract during January," said Andrew "Lefty" Palm, state director of the United Steelworkers of America and negotiating committee chairman for Coatesville's Local 1165. But the union will not sign an agreement lacking "true partnership and job security," Palm told three reporters asked to come to the local's office.
NEWS
February 5, 1995 | By Edward A. Robinson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
County sheriff's deputies made their case to state officials last week for the right to organize a union, and now all they can do is wait. They may wait a very long time. Last Tuesday, the fledgling Chester County Deputy Sheriffs Association and a lawyer representing the county government faced off in a hearing before an examiner from the Pennsylvania Labor Relations Board. Once written arguments are submitted to the examiner next month, the official has an indefinite amount of time to decide whether the deputies can legally join forces as a collective bargaining unit.
NEWS
November 7, 2000 | By Jere Downs and Richard V. Sabatini, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Agreement is near on a three-year contract offering some protection for toll collectors fearful of losing jobs to E-ZPass, a Pennsylvania Turnpike commissioner said yesterday. "They are not walking out," Commissioner Mitchell Rubin said of the turnpike's 1,900 union employees. "Job security is basically one of our major issues. We're going back and forth. " The Turnpike Commission could vote on an agreement as early as today in Carlisle, Rubin said. Union leaders have declined to comment publicly since Oct. 31, when the previous contract expired.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 20, 2014
REGARDING our present economic situation, I believe that we, the people, can change it for the better. We, the people, have more power than we realize as voters and as consumers. The only legitimate reason for not voting is being unconscious on Election Day. As consumers we can put the pressure on Congress and the CEOs to tell them that we want to work. When we shop, we should always look for the "Made in America" label. We should be in the habit of always asking, "Where is it made?"
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
EVER been stuck in a "permanent" temp job with no benefits, no job security? Ever been asked to move far afield when your company decided to pick up and leave town? Or fearful that downsizing and outsourcing might soon be your fate? If so, join the crowd. And commune with Ethan Lipton's "No Place to Go," a wincefully funny and tuneful stage show about life on dead-end street, playing the SEI Innovation Theater at the Kimmel Center tonight and tomorrow. Fashioned as a versatile (blues, jazz, protest-folky)
SPORTS
March 27, 2014 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Staff Writer
OF THE four general managers of Philadelphia professional sports teams, Ruben Amaro Jr. is perhaps best qualified to speak of the job's perks and perils. Celebrated for trades that made baseball in these parts extremely fun over his first three seasons as Pat Gillick's successor, he may be at an all-time ebb in popularity after a winter of free-agent signings that made his team older and even more suspect. As he did last spring, Amaro yesterday graciously agreed to sit down and discuss this and other topics in a wide-ranging interview.
NEWS
February 5, 2014
DO YOU FEAR losing your job? If so, you are like a lot of people these days - and you'll be interested in The Economy of You: Discover Your Inner Entrepreneur and Recession-Proof Your Life , by Kimberly Palmer (AMACOM, $21.95). It is the Color of Money Book Club selection for February. Palmer, senior money editor and consumer blogger at U.S. News & World Report , argues that in a world of zero job security, you need to create a stream of income in addition to your regular 9-to-5 job. "Relying solely on a single employer is a surefire way to end up struggling, as so many Americans do," Palmer writes.
SPORTS
October 29, 2013 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Perhaps the toughest job in professional sports is being an NBA head coach. There are a only a few coaches who have job security. Others are fired in the blink of an eye. Of the 30 NBA coaches who began last season, 13 lost their jobs. The list of departed coaches included 2012-13 coach of the year George Karl, Lionel Hollins, and Byron Scott. This is a high-pressure job - and it can be argued that the 76ers' rookie coach, Brett Brown, has the toughest of them all. He'll lead a team that is expected to finish with the league's worst record.
SPORTS
October 21, 2013 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
About a month ago, the big boss, Ed Snider, was the picture of optimism. The Flyers chairman said that last season was an aberration, that the players had a much better rapport this year, that the three newcomers - Vinny Lecavalier, Mark Streit, and Ray Emery - would contribute mightily to a turnaround. Snider also insisted that, even if the Flyers got off to a shaky start, coach Peter Laviolette and general manager Paul Holmgren had job security. The Flyers began the season 0-3. Laviolette was fired.
SPORTS
October 18, 2013 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
CHARLOTTE - Before his team's morning preseason game against the Charlotte Bobcats at Time Warner Cable Arena, 76ers coach Brett Brown passionately talked about the opportunity that was presenting itself to so many of his players. The coach decided not to play starters Thaddeus Young, Evan Turner and Spencer Hawes so that he could give more opportunity to those competing for playing time and roster spots. Had some of the fringe players exhibited the same fire as their coach, they probably would have some job security.
NEWS
August 31, 2013 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Gov. Corbett's approval rating tumbled to its lowest point yet in a closely watched independent poll Thursday, leaving the Republican in a historic hole as he gears up for his 2014 reelection campaign. Only one in five registered voters believes Corbett has done a good enough job to earn a second term, the Franklin and Marshall College Poll found. Sixteen percent rated his performance in office "excellent" or "good," compared with 76 percent who said he was doing an "only fair" or "poor" job. "That is the lowest job-performance number for any governor in modern history," said G. Terry Madonna, director of the survey.
NEWS
June 16, 2013 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
MORE Philadelphia school employees were told yesterday that they were losing their jobs as the latest wave of layoffs hit the district's headquarters, including workers who were guaranteed job security in their contract. About 76 employees who work at Broad Street near Spring Garden were told that June 30 would be their last day, the district said in a statement. Another 61 vacant positions will be eliminated. The layoffs, which the district says will save $23 million, come on top of last week's whopping announcement of 3,783 layoffs, moves aimed at helping close a $304 million shortfall, district officials said.
SPORTS
March 5, 2013 | By David Murphy, Daily News Staff Writer
FORT MYERS, Fla. - It was the kind of day that is known to occur once or twice this time of year. The flags in centerfield were pointing out of the ballpark and the temperature was struggling to stay in the 50s and the guys on the mound were no longer pitching like they were ahead of the hitters. Up and down the Gulf Coast of Florida, long fly balls screamed out of stadiums like tracers on an overcast sky. Back in Clearwater, Domonic Brown and Ryan Howard both launched pitches into the heart of the jet stream, the latter's home run looking for an instant like it might drop a surprise on the hood of one of the unwitting blue hairs who were matriculating their vehicles up the highway that runs behind the rightfield wall.
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