FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 19, 2011 | By Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele
Washington is obsessed with the budget deficit. It's all that lawmakers can talk about. The hysteria is such that they can't even agree on raising the ceiling on the national debt. As for how much to cut out of the budget, some would settle on reduced spending in the billions. Others want much more. As one headline summed it up: "[House Speaker John] Boehner demands 'trillions' in spending cuts in exchange for lifting debt ceiling. " There's only one problem: Congress is wrought up over the wrong deficit.
NEWS
February 12, 2008
By Dominic Pileggi There is a lot of good happening in my hometown of Chester, the oldest city in Pennsylvania. But as Chester continues to recover from the dramatic loss of industrial and manufacturing jobs, and the loss of half its population - about 38,000 people - between 1950 and 2000, government must work with companies to plant the seeds of long-lasting revitalization in the city as it has with other older waterfront communities in Delaware County....
NEWS
January 13, 2012 | By Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
GREER, S.C. - Facing efforts by his Republican rivals to paint him as a heartless corporate raider who preyed on struggling companies while working in private equity, Republican front-runner Mitt Romney stepped up his defense of his tenure at Bain Capital on Thursday, arguing that his goal had been to make businesses successful over the long term. Supporters of former House Speaker Newt Gingrich have promised a "strong and sustained" campaign in the Palmetto State attacking Romney's career at Bain.
NEWS
April 7, 2006
PRESIDENT Bush must be going crazy trying to understand the American public. First George W. ships a lot of good jobs overseas during his administration, and the people complain that we are losing good jobs here. Then he tries to bring in and legitimize the illegal aliens already here in order to do jobs that are still here and have those jobs stay here. The people complain about that, too. What do Americans want? Mayer Krain Philadelphia
NEWS
February 4, 2010 | FATIMAH ALI
THE president finally understands that creating jobs trumps everything else on his plate, and I expect him to make some fast progress fixing the broken economy. There are far too many people underwater economically, with only a few gasps of air left. From the outset of his administration, it was obvious that getting the economy on track and putting Americans back to work should have topped President Obama's agenda. I'm still scratching my head over why he thought people without jobs would be more concerned about health insurance than working, when they're just trying to keep a roof over their heads and buy groceries.
NEWS
January 30, 2008
AGAIN, the anti-casino folks think they're winning the battle to delay the SugarHouse Casino. Residents who want this development have not only lived in Philadelphia all of their lives but many have lived in Fishtown all of their lives. We don't come from Boston or Ohio. We don't need another park or condo! We need something that will generate money and give us jobs! Donna Tomlinson, Board Member Fishtown Action
NEWS
June 14, 2006 | By Peter A. Gold
Besides providing higher education in its classrooms, Rutgers University is an active partner for economic growth in New Jersey and the region. One example of that is the Rutgers-Camden Technology Campus Inc., a mixed-use business incubator that is generating the jobs, new business and innovations needed to create a diverse economic base. Currently home to 50 businesses (35 on-site and 15 virtual tenants), the incubator has netted exceptional economic development results during the last three years.
NEWS
June 20, 2003
Tell us a story that sums up your most memorable summer job experience, whether good, bad or somewhere in between. What did you learn about yourself or the working life in general? Send essays of 200 to 300 words to Voices/Jobs, The Inquirer, 800 River Rd., Conshohocken, Pa. 19428. Send e-mail to pavoices@phillynews.com or faxes to 610-313-8243. Questions? Call Kevin Ferris, Pennsylvania Voices editor, at 610-313-8202.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2004 | By Thomas J. Brady INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Xlibris Corp., a Philadelphia book publisher, has laid off about 35 customer-service workers and moved the jobs to the Philippines. By relocating the work to a country where wages are lower, the company can triple the number of people doing similar work for the company, John Feldcamp, Xlibris chief executive officer, said yesterday. The jobs here paid about $24,000 a year. In the Philippines, he said, salaries for replacement workers are about one-fifth of that. "It was an act of necessity, not of greed," he said.
NEWS
May 17, 2002 | By PATRICK B. GILLESPIE
WHEN PEOPLE ASK me why I am supporting Ed Rendell for governor, I have a one-word answer: "Jobs. " Pennsylvania needs them. Ed Rendell knows how to help create them. There are 76,000 fewer Pennsylvanians working today than there were just one year ago. Pennsylvania workers need a governor who is committed to putting people to work at good, high-wage jobs. Ed Rendell not only has a plan to do that, but he is the only candidate for governor who has a record of actually putting people back to work.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 26, 2014 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Growing up in Camden, Olivia Glenn vividly recalls being enchanted on a childhood visit to Farnham Park in her Parkside neighborhood. It not only changed her view of the world, but also shaped her destiny. She has made it her mission to protect the environment she loves. "It absolutely stuck with me," she said. "It gave me an appreciation for the beauty of nature. " Glenn, 35, returned to Camden this month as the metro regional manager for the New Jersey Conservation Foundation, a nonprofit group that preserves land and other natural resources in the state.
SPORTS
August 22, 2014 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Union signed Algerian World Cup goalkeeper Rais Mbolhi on July 30 and said he would be the starter as soon as he was ready. That time apparently has not arrived. Because of visa problems and a minor car accident, Mbolhi had been delayed in Paris. He was expected to arrive in Philadelphia on Wednesday. Interim manager Jim Curtin strongly suggested that Zac MacMath would be in goal for the Major League Soccer game against San Jose at 8 p.m. Sunday at PPL Park. The Union will not practice Thursday, but Mbolhi is expected to go through an individual workout.
NEWS
August 22, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Mark Manzoni, a bartender at the doomed Revel Casino Hotel in Atlantic City, has a manila envelope in his hand and a smile on his face. "I just got a job," the Galloway Township resident says. "My last shift at Revel ends at 8 a.m. on Labor Day, and I go down to Maryland Sept. 2. " Manzoni, 50, was the first to arrive and the first hired during the job fair sponsored Tuesday and Wednesday by the Maryland Live! Casino. With the Atlantic Club already dark and Revel, Showboat, and Trump Plaza scheduled to shut down within weeks, an estimated 8,000 Atlantic City casino workers will have lost their jobs this year.
NEWS
August 14, 2014 | By Amy Worden and Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG - Former Pennsylvania Education Secretary Ron Tomalis has resigned as a special adviser to Gov. Corbett, amid questions about his duties and allegations that his position amounted to a "ghost job" on the state payroll. Acting Secretary of Education Carolyn Dumaresq on Tuesday announced Tomalis will leave his $140,000-a-year job as an adviser on higher education issues in two weeks. Democrats, however, vowed to keep the controversy alive in the gubernatorial race. Corbett had defended Tomalis after the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette last month reported he had done little since taking the adviser job after resigning as education secretary in May 2013 - while keeping the same salary.
SPORTS
August 6, 2014 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. - James Franklin began his first media day as Penn State's head football coach by looking out at a room filled with hundreds of reporters, smiling big, and asking questions. "How's everybody doing?" Murmur, murmur. "How was everybody's summer?" Murmur, too short, murmur. "Short?" Murmur, murmur. "You guys look shocked," Franklin said, "like it's unusual to start it this way. " It was. Franklin took 14 questions over the next 35 minutes Monday afternoon, and after each media member had taken the microphone and identified himself or herself, Franklin made sure to use the questioner's name in his answer, regardless of whether he'd ever met the person before.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
The unemployment rate ticked upward 0.1 percentage point to 6.2 percent last week, and July marked the first time since 1997 that the United States has booked six consecutive 200,000-plus months of payroll growth. In other words, "we're in the midst of the best labor market conditions in more than a decade and a half," Janney Montgomery Scott's Guy LeBas, chief fixed income strategist, noted Friday. Better job markets could mean rising interest rates, and in that environment, floating-rate bond funds are a decent place to invest, says Bradford Bernstein, senior vice president of wealth management in UBS's Philadelphia office.
NEWS
August 3, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. payrolls grew by 209,000 jobs in July - less than expected, but still enough to begin to erase the jobs deficit created by the recession, the U.S. Labor Department reported Friday. Even the rising unemployment rate, which ticked up by a tenth of a point to 6.2 percent, is an indicator of growth. That's because, to count as unemployed, a jobless person must actively be seeking work. As employment prospects improve, some people who had been sitting on the sidelines may reenter the labor market and start sending out resum├ęs, but may not immediately find work.
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | By Stacey Burling and Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writers
Last week's shooting at an outpatient office on the campus of Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital was a reminder that the healing professions can be surprisingly dangerous. Organized nurses and emergency doctors have complained for years about violence at work that is common and frightening but that won't grab headlines like the case in which a patient opened fire, killing a caseworker before he was stopped by a psychiatrist who had his own gun and returned fire. "People get frustrated because everybody pays attention to this particular incident, but don't realize that . . . nurses and other health-care providers are victims of violence every day," said Deena Brecher, president of the Emergency Nurses Association.
BUSINESS
July 27, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Merck & Co., which is reorganizing to slash $2.5 billion in costs and 8,500 workers, has informed Pennsylvania officials that it will cut 600 jobs at facilities in North Wales and Lansdale. The cuts were disclosed in an official notice posted on the state Department of Labor and Industry website. According to the notice, the effective date is Aug. 26. Steven Cragle, spokesman for the Whitehouse Station, N.J.-based pharmaceutical giant, said Friday that the notice was sent in June, and that employees losing their jobs would be mostly field-based salespeople who call on family doctors and medical facilities.
NEWS
July 13, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tom Wolf spent part of Friday morning touring Norristown's Chandler Bats company to discuss his job-creation plan. The campaign stop was also a chance for Wolf, the Democrat challenging Gov. Corbett in November, to see how the baseball bats are manufactured before the company ships them out to Major League Baseball teams. "I want to showcase the idea that we can make things here in the United States," said Wolf, who owns a cabinet company in York. "That means we can make things here in Pennsylvania.
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