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NEWS
December 11, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Subaru of America on Wednesday broke ground on the site of the company's future Camden headquarters, a project that will transform a vacant plot of land off the Admiral Wilson Boulevard into a sprawling office park. The property, across from the Campbell Soup Co. complex, will be the new home base for the company's U.S. operations, bringing together four offices. In addition to the 250,000-square-foot facility planned for the land, the company will build an 83,000-square-foot training facility.
NEWS
June 19, 2011 | By Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele
Washington is obsessed with the budget deficit. It's all that lawmakers can talk about. The hysteria is such that they can't even agree on raising the ceiling on the national debt. As for how much to cut out of the budget, some would settle on reduced spending in the billions. Others want much more. As one headline summed it up: "[House Speaker John] Boehner demands 'trillions' in spending cuts in exchange for lifting debt ceiling. " There's only one problem: Congress is wrought up over the wrong deficit.
NEWS
February 12, 2008
By Dominic Pileggi There is a lot of good happening in my hometown of Chester, the oldest city in Pennsylvania. But as Chester continues to recover from the dramatic loss of industrial and manufacturing jobs, and the loss of half its population - about 38,000 people - between 1950 and 2000, government must work with companies to plant the seeds of long-lasting revitalization in the city as it has with other older waterfront communities in Delaware County....
NEWS
April 7, 2006
PRESIDENT Bush must be going crazy trying to understand the American public. First George W. ships a lot of good jobs overseas during his administration, and the people complain that we are losing good jobs here. Then he tries to bring in and legitimize the illegal aliens already here in order to do jobs that are still here and have those jobs stay here. The people complain about that, too. What do Americans want? Mayer Krain Philadelphia
NEWS
February 4, 2010 | FATIMAH ALI
THE president finally understands that creating jobs trumps everything else on his plate, and I expect him to make some fast progress fixing the broken economy. There are far too many people underwater economically, with only a few gasps of air left. From the outset of his administration, it was obvious that getting the economy on track and putting Americans back to work should have topped President Obama's agenda. I'm still scratching my head over why he thought people without jobs would be more concerned about health insurance than working, when they're just trying to keep a roof over their heads and buy groceries.
NEWS
January 30, 2008
AGAIN, the anti-casino folks think they're winning the battle to delay the SugarHouse Casino. Residents who want this development have not only lived in Philadelphia all of their lives but many have lived in Fishtown all of their lives. We don't come from Boston or Ohio. We don't need another park or condo! We need something that will generate money and give us jobs! Donna Tomlinson, Board Member Fishtown Action
NEWS
January 13, 2012 | By Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
GREER, S.C. - Facing efforts by his Republican rivals to paint him as a heartless corporate raider who preyed on struggling companies while working in private equity, Republican front-runner Mitt Romney stepped up his defense of his tenure at Bain Capital on Thursday, arguing that his goal had been to make businesses successful over the long term. Supporters of former House Speaker Newt Gingrich have promised a "strong and sustained" campaign in the Palmetto State attacking Romney's career at Bain.
NEWS
June 14, 2006 | By Peter A. Gold
Besides providing higher education in its classrooms, Rutgers University is an active partner for economic growth in New Jersey and the region. One example of that is the Rutgers-Camden Technology Campus Inc., a mixed-use business incubator that is generating the jobs, new business and innovations needed to create a diverse economic base. Currently home to 50 businesses (35 on-site and 15 virtual tenants), the incubator has netted exceptional economic development results during the last three years.
NEWS
June 20, 2003
Tell us a story that sums up your most memorable summer job experience, whether good, bad or somewhere in between. What did you learn about yourself or the working life in general? Send essays of 200 to 300 words to Voices/Jobs, The Inquirer, 800 River Rd., Conshohocken, Pa. 19428. Send e-mail to pavoices@phillynews.com or faxes to 610-313-8243. Questions? Call Kevin Ferris, Pennsylvania Voices editor, at 610-313-8202.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2004 | By Thomas J. Brady INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Xlibris Corp., a Philadelphia book publisher, has laid off about 35 customer-service workers and moved the jobs to the Philippines. By relocating the work to a country where wages are lower, the company can triple the number of people doing similar work for the company, John Feldcamp, Xlibris chief executive officer, said yesterday. The jobs here paid about $24,000 a year. In the Philippines, he said, salaries for replacement workers are about one-fifth of that. "It was an act of necessity, not of greed," he said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 23, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
Job applicants no longer need to disclose any criminal history when applying to work for Montgomery County, which on Thursday joined cities and counties across the country in waiving the requirement. The new policy is aimed at helping those who are leaving jail find employment and reduce their chances of being rearrested, said Josh Shapiro, chairman of the county commissioners. "Montgomery County has now officially banned the box, and that is the box that often shuts people out from second chances," he said, referring to the box that candidates check on applications if they have been convicted of a crime.
NEWS
July 23, 2016
By David Spigelmyer While the daily headlines and nonstop, 24-hour news cycles focus overwhelmingly on issues that often divide the nation, it can be easy to lose sight of where common ground exists and what shared commitments bring us together. And there's more that unites us - business and labor as well as Republicans, Democrats, and independents - than divides us. While division might drive TV ratings and social-media clicks, it's no secret that all Americans support a stronger economy with low unemployment; a thriving manufacturing sector that creates middle-class jobs for families; and a healthier, cleaner environment for our kids and grandkids.
NEWS
July 21, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
The city of Philadelphia is on a hiring spree, sparked by the recently passed sweetened-beverage tax. More than two dozen jobs have been posted since last week, and city officials say more are on the way. They range from data analysts and school-health specialists to a workforce manager for a prekindergarten expansion, all listed as the city prepares to launch both the tax and the programs it will fund. "These are important early steps that we need to take to make sure the programs are implemented effectively," city finance director Rob Dubow said.
NEWS
July 21, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis and Craig R. McCoy, STAFF WRITERS
HARRISBURG - Just three weeks before Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane's criminal trial is scheduled to begin, her top aides interviewed the son of a key witness against her for a job in her office, raising questions of conflict and concerns about inappropriate influence. Matthew Peifer was interviewed in the Norristown office of the Attorney General's Office on Monday morning by Kane's chief of staff, Jonathan Duecker, and another agent, according to two people familiar with the meeting.
NEWS
July 17, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
More than 66,000 Pennsylvanians worked last year in the clean energy industry at 5,900 businesses, up 15.7 percent from 2014, according to a report compiled by two advocacy groups. About 53,000 Pennsylvanians work in the energy-efficiency sector, including manufacturers of equipment and installers of high-efficiency systems, according to the report by the Keystone Energy Efficiency Alliance and Environmental Entrepreneurs. Another 8,800 worked in renewable energy, including about 5,200 who spend at least half their time working in solar.
NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
Cynthia Figueroa took the lectern Wednesday as the new head of the Philadelphia Department of Human Services - an agency under sanctions, overwhelmed with an increase in children, and struggling with depleted employee morale - and let out a loud, "Woo-hoo!" "I'm excited. I'm so excited!" Figueroa, 43, said to energetic applause from the crowd gathered in the Mayor's Reception Room. "I know it's a huge challenge, but I don't care. I'm excited. There's a lot of work for us to do, and our interests of children have to be first and not the politics of the work.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Question: I thought you were right on in your answer to B. from Maine about who pays for dates (Feb. 2). You were correct to suggest kindness. However, I think your answer was a little simplistic when you said, "Note, none of these rules is gender-specific," including, "if you ask someone to dinner, you pay. " Let's be real: The rules are not gender-specific, but the rituals are. Who does most of the asking? Our culture's courtship rituals are based upon gender roles of previous generations.
BUSINESS
July 13, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Black lives matter, no doubt. But what will often make a crucial difference in those black lives are good jobs. "Anytime there is economic insecurity, you see racial tensions like we have now," Derrick Johnson, president for the Mississippi State Conference for the NAACP, told about 75 workers, labor leaders and activists gathered at City Hall on Monday. Monday's conference, sponsored by two of the nation's largest labor unions, follows six days of local protests over fatal shootings in Minnesota and Louisiana.
NEWS
July 12, 2016 | By Janaki Chadha, Staff Writer
When Chutong Tan, 21, came to the United States from China four years ago, she spoke just a few words of English. After her first day at Solomon Charter School in Chinatown, she was in tears, said her stepfather, Allan Wong. Solomon offered no formal language support. Tan soon transferred to Furness High School in South Philadelphia, and things began to turn around. At Furness, where nearly half of the students are English language learners (ELLs), Tan said, she felt much more comfortable.
NEWS
July 11, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
The nation's roller-coaster job market rocketed to a peak in June after plunging even lower than originally reported in May. The U.S. Labor Department's report released Friday morning shows that the nation added an impressive 287,000 jobs in June, a marked contrast to the 38,000 jobs added in May. That number was revised downward on Friday to a meager 11,000. While economists all agreed that May's meager number was an anomaly, the June report amounted to a giant exhale, as Georgetown University professor and former U.S. Department of Labor chief economist Harry Holzer wrote in an email.
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