FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 19, 2011 | By Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele
Washington is obsessed with the budget deficit. It's all that lawmakers can talk about. The hysteria is such that they can't even agree on raising the ceiling on the national debt. As for how much to cut out of the budget, some would settle on reduced spending in the billions. Others want much more. As one headline summed it up: "[House Speaker John] Boehner demands 'trillions' in spending cuts in exchange for lifting debt ceiling. " There's only one problem: Congress is wrought up over the wrong deficit.
NEWS
February 12, 2008
By Dominic Pileggi There is a lot of good happening in my hometown of Chester, the oldest city in Pennsylvania. But as Chester continues to recover from the dramatic loss of industrial and manufacturing jobs, and the loss of half its population - about 38,000 people - between 1950 and 2000, government must work with companies to plant the seeds of long-lasting revitalization in the city as it has with other older waterfront communities in Delaware County....
NEWS
April 7, 2006
PRESIDENT Bush must be going crazy trying to understand the American public. First George W. ships a lot of good jobs overseas during his administration, and the people complain that we are losing good jobs here. Then he tries to bring in and legitimize the illegal aliens already here in order to do jobs that are still here and have those jobs stay here. The people complain about that, too. What do Americans want? Mayer Krain Philadelphia
NEWS
February 4, 2010 | FATIMAH ALI
THE president finally understands that creating jobs trumps everything else on his plate, and I expect him to make some fast progress fixing the broken economy. There are far too many people underwater economically, with only a few gasps of air left. From the outset of his administration, it was obvious that getting the economy on track and putting Americans back to work should have topped President Obama's agenda. I'm still scratching my head over why he thought people without jobs would be more concerned about health insurance than working, when they're just trying to keep a roof over their heads and buy groceries.
NEWS
January 30, 2008
AGAIN, the anti-casino folks think they're winning the battle to delay the SugarHouse Casino. Residents who want this development have not only lived in Philadelphia all of their lives but many have lived in Fishtown all of their lives. We don't come from Boston or Ohio. We don't need another park or condo! We need something that will generate money and give us jobs! Donna Tomlinson, Board Member Fishtown Action
NEWS
January 13, 2012 | By Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
GREER, S.C. - Facing efforts by his Republican rivals to paint him as a heartless corporate raider who preyed on struggling companies while working in private equity, Republican front-runner Mitt Romney stepped up his defense of his tenure at Bain Capital on Thursday, arguing that his goal had been to make businesses successful over the long term. Supporters of former House Speaker Newt Gingrich have promised a "strong and sustained" campaign in the Palmetto State attacking Romney's career at Bain.
NEWS
June 14, 2006 | By Peter A. Gold
Besides providing higher education in its classrooms, Rutgers University is an active partner for economic growth in New Jersey and the region. One example of that is the Rutgers-Camden Technology Campus Inc., a mixed-use business incubator that is generating the jobs, new business and innovations needed to create a diverse economic base. Currently home to 50 businesses (35 on-site and 15 virtual tenants), the incubator has netted exceptional economic development results during the last three years.
NEWS
June 15, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The prospect of layoffs at a Chester County helicopter manufacturer means more than a lost job for Brian Newhouse. "I love it," he said of his work. "It's a passion. " An Alabama native with a salt-and-pepper beard, Newhouse served in the military and moved around the South before starting at Sikorsky Global Helicopter in Coatesville eight years ago. "I've been here long enough to love the area, to make new friends and get to know people I consider family, and I would hate to leave," the 51-year-old said.
NEWS
July 17, 2015
J OSEPH DOUGHERTY, the 73-year-old former labor leader awaiting sentencing next week on a federal racketeering conviction, just found out the hard way that not even Shakespeare can soften the blow of a judge's gavel. U.S. District Judge Michael Baylson yesterday rejected Dougherty's Hail Mary motion for an acquittal or a new trial. Baylson began the ruling thusly: "Who finds the heifer dead and bleeding fresh, And sees fast by a butcher with an axe, But will suspect 'twas he that made the slaughter?"
NEWS
June 20, 2003
Tell us a story that sums up your most memorable summer job experience, whether good, bad or somewhere in between. What did you learn about yourself or the working life in general? Send essays of 200 to 300 words to Voices/Jobs, The Inquirer, 800 River Rd., Conshohocken, Pa. 19428. Send e-mail to pavoices@phillynews.com or faxes to 610-313-8243. Questions? Call Kevin Ferris, Pennsylvania Voices editor, at 610-313-8202.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 21, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
A new report that indicates Philadelphia has lost more jobs than New York, Chicago, and several other big cities in creative industries such as music, theater, and related fields should concern arts leaders and public officials. Some in the arts community disagree with the Center for an Urban Future's assessment in June that Philadelphia experienced a 24 percent decline in creative jobs between 2003 and 2013. They say self-employed workers and workers in related jobs such as graphic design and communications were wrongly left out of the survey.
NEWS
July 17, 2015
J OSEPH DOUGHERTY, the 73-year-old former labor leader awaiting sentencing next week on a federal racketeering conviction, just found out the hard way that not even Shakespeare can soften the blow of a judge's gavel. U.S. District Judge Michael Baylson yesterday rejected Dougherty's Hail Mary motion for an acquittal or a new trial. Baylson began the ruling thusly: "Who finds the heifer dead and bleeding fresh, And sees fast by a butcher with an axe, But will suspect 'twas he that made the slaughter?"
BUSINESS
July 16, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Job seeker Charles Hendricks, 35, who was at the Convention Center for the NAACP's diversity job fair, had to run to class Tuesday, so he didn't have time to listen to President Obama speaking down the hall. But Obama's speech to more than 3,000 at the NAACP's annual convention hit Hendricks' situation right on the money. Or rather, lack of it. "I'm looking for any kind of work," said Hendricks, a convicted felon and an African American from North Philadelphia, who is attending the ITT Technical Institute of Philadelphia, where he is studying computer drafting and design.
NEWS
July 15, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
AT ONE POINT yesterday, I wondered if I should hold a mirror under my nose. Maybe I was dead. Maybe that explained the sound of crickets when I tried to get responses to the late-day news Friday that six former Philadelphia police officers who were the subject of a made-for-TV, 26-count federal indictment got their jobs back through arbitration. An arbitrator ruled to reinstate them, with a year's worth of back pay. Two months ago, a jury acquitted the officers - Thomas Liciardello, Michael Spicer, Brian Reynolds, Perry Betts, Linwood Norman and John Speiser - of allegedly using their positions to run a criminal enterprise.
NEWS
July 12, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
Annmarie Ruiz has been handed a third card. The Gloucester County health officer, who doubles as Salem County's, will now also report to Atlantic City. Ruiz - charged with enforcing health and sanitation policies and restaurant inspections, and coordinating responses to public health issues - will now split her time among the jurisdictions under a shared-services agreement approved this week by Gloucester County. Atlantic City will pay Gloucester County $2,470 a month until the end of the year - an amount that will increase 2 percent at the start of 2016.
SPORTS
July 9, 2015 | By Jake Kaplan, Inquirer Staff Writer
LOS ANGELES - Chase Utley continues to work his way back from the ankle inflammation that landed him on the disabled list two weeks ago. The Phillies are hoping he will resume baseball activities this weekend in San Francisco, where the team plays a weekend series. But even upon Utley's eventual return to the lineup, all indications are that Cesar Hernandez will continue to play as the Phillies' primary second baseman. On Tuesday at Dodger Stadium, general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. deemed the 25-year-old Hernandez the team's "best second baseman.
SPORTS
July 7, 2015 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Columnist
ATLANTA - If you have ever awoken to a ruptured septic tank, then you know what Pete Mackanin is wading through every day. He is the interim manager of a Phillies team comprised of rich, fading stars, desperate veterans and unseasoned young talent. Thanks to awful starting pitching, laughable offense and bad defense, the team is losing games with alarming efficiency. Their manager, Hall of Fame second baseman Ryne Sandberg, quit on them 10 days ago. Their general manager, Ruben Amaro Jr., is in the final year of his deal, and it is he who will be blamed for the franchise's structural decay.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
To his many supporters, Bill Bennett is a warm, all-in principal who dresses up on Halloween, knows the name of every student, goes to all the band concerts, and listens patiently to teachers over coffee and doughnuts. Indeed, "the Pinch-Me Elementary School" was a nickname that some parents and staff adopted for the highly rated Indian Lane Elementary School in the Rose Tree Media School District during Bennett's tenure, which began in 1999. "You couldn't believe that this is so great," said Liz Corra, who sent her two kids through the K-5 school.
NEWS
June 24, 2015
ISSUE | SCHOOL FUNDING All fall down on job Although I share the view that it's City Council's responsibility to provide adequate and consistent funding for Philadelphia schools, more attention should be given to the state legislature's role in creating the problems the School District faces ("Indecent proposal," June 17). Since the late 1990s, the legislature has ducked its responsibility for adequately funding the pension fund it created and manages. To correct this oversight, the legislature has passed the responsibility for addressing pension fund obligations to local districts - which in turn have had to dramatically increase taxes and/or reduce operating costs and programs.
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