FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
MICHAEL A. BROWN, who pulled himself up by his bootstraps to become founder/president of Environmental Construction Services in the Far Northeast, said yesterday that he is moving his company to Oxford Circle to make it a job-providing "pillar of the community. " Brown said that in 2010 when he founded the company - which retrofits businesses to reduce their energy costs - people told him he couldn't find skilled employees in Philadelphia. They were wrong. "In one year, I grew our company from four employees to 32 - everyone from energy auditors to union sheet metalworkers, pipe fitters and plumbers," Brown said.
NEWS
June 19, 2011 | By Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele
Washington is obsessed with the budget deficit. It's all that lawmakers can talk about. The hysteria is such that they can't even agree on raising the ceiling on the national debt. As for how much to cut out of the budget, some would settle on reduced spending in the billions. Others want much more. As one headline summed it up: "[House Speaker John] Boehner demands 'trillions' in spending cuts in exchange for lifting debt ceiling. " There's only one problem: Congress is wrought up over the wrong deficit.
NEWS
February 12, 2008
By Dominic Pileggi There is a lot of good happening in my hometown of Chester, the oldest city in Pennsylvania. But as Chester continues to recover from the dramatic loss of industrial and manufacturing jobs, and the loss of half its population - about 38,000 people - between 1950 and 2000, government must work with companies to plant the seeds of long-lasting revitalization in the city as it has with other older waterfront communities in Delaware County....
NEWS
January 13, 2012 | By Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
GREER, S.C. - Facing efforts by his Republican rivals to paint him as a heartless corporate raider who preyed on struggling companies while working in private equity, Republican front-runner Mitt Romney stepped up his defense of his tenure at Bain Capital on Thursday, arguing that his goal had been to make businesses successful over the long term. Supporters of former House Speaker Newt Gingrich have promised a "strong and sustained" campaign in the Palmetto State attacking Romney's career at Bain.
NEWS
April 7, 2006
PRESIDENT Bush must be going crazy trying to understand the American public. First George W. ships a lot of good jobs overseas during his administration, and the people complain that we are losing good jobs here. Then he tries to bring in and legitimize the illegal aliens already here in order to do jobs that are still here and have those jobs stay here. The people complain about that, too. What do Americans want? Mayer Krain Philadelphia
NEWS
February 4, 2010 | FATIMAH ALI
THE president finally understands that creating jobs trumps everything else on his plate, and I expect him to make some fast progress fixing the broken economy. There are far too many people underwater economically, with only a few gasps of air left. From the outset of his administration, it was obvious that getting the economy on track and putting Americans back to work should have topped President Obama's agenda. I'm still scratching my head over why he thought people without jobs would be more concerned about health insurance than working, when they're just trying to keep a roof over their heads and buy groceries.
NEWS
January 30, 2008
AGAIN, the anti-casino folks think they're winning the battle to delay the SugarHouse Casino. Residents who want this development have not only lived in Philadelphia all of their lives but many have lived in Fishtown all of their lives. We don't come from Boston or Ohio. We don't need another park or condo! We need something that will generate money and give us jobs! Donna Tomlinson, Board Member Fishtown Action
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2011 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Columnist
CBS recruiter Bryn Berglund had some internship advice for the 100-or-so eager Penn undergrads in the Wharton School auditorium: "You need to work hard, and you need to be nice. " Jobs may be Job 1 at Wharton, where the event took place Wednesday evening, but students had also come to see a new TV show and its star. She was living proof that the recruiter's advice was solid. "Be a fighter. Don't take no for an answer," Beth Behrs told the students. "You have to work it. " She didn't have to confirm the nice advice.
NEWS
June 14, 2006 | By Peter A. Gold
Besides providing higher education in its classrooms, Rutgers University is an active partner for economic growth in New Jersey and the region. One example of that is the Rutgers-Camden Technology Campus Inc., a mixed-use business incubator that is generating the jobs, new business and innovations needed to create a diverse economic base. Currently home to 50 businesses (35 on-site and 15 virtual tenants), the incubator has netted exceptional economic development results during the last three years.
NEWS
November 9, 2009 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Staff Writer
Second of four parts Thanks to $25 million in recovery money, America's poorest city now has hippos. The landmark 2002 Municipal Rehabilitation and Economic Recovery Act that put Camden under state control set aside $175 million for dozens of city projects. And none was larger, or more emblematic, than the $25 million expansion of the 10-year-old, state-owned aquarium. The money bought the city a privatized aquarium with hippos, sharks, and a West African aviary. But it did not affect Camden's median income, the lowest of any medium-sized American city.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
April 17, 2014 | Daily News staff and wire reports
CALIFORNIA HIRED Tennessee's Cuonzo Martin as its coach yesterday, charging him with taking over another program after a successful run by his predecessor. Martin replaces Mike Montgomery, who retired last month after six seasons in Berkeley. Martin went 63-41 in three seasons at Tennessee, including a 24-13 mark and an appearance in the regional semifinals of the NCAA Tournament this season. He also was previously the coach at Missouri State. He takes over for one of the most successful college coaches in the history of the San Francisco Bay Area.
SPORTS
April 16, 2014 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
The home schedule came to a merciful close for the 76ers on Monday night, and it ended, fittingly enough, against another team that has struggled through a season dedicated to the future rather than the present. Both teams have one game remaining, but the rest of the league has already stopped paying attention. The Miami Heat and the Washington Wizards, the final opponents for the Sixers and Celtics, respectively, didn't bother to send scouts to Monday's game. The entire scouts' table was empty at the Wells Fargo Center, mute testimony that whatever needs to be learned about these teams has already been learned or is no longer necessary.
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
MICHAEL A. BROWN, who pulled himself up by his bootstraps to become founder/president of Environmental Construction Services in the Far Northeast, said yesterday that he is moving his company to Oxford Circle to make it a job-providing "pillar of the community. " Brown said that in 2010 when he founded the company - which retrofits businesses to reduce their energy costs - people told him he couldn't find skilled employees in Philadelphia. They were wrong. "In one year, I grew our company from four employees to 32 - everyone from energy auditors to union sheet metalworkers, pipe fitters and plumbers," Brown said.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The leader of SEPTA's delayed $130 million smart-card fare system retired last week and went to work for the company that is assisting SEPTA in creating the new system. John McGee, SEPTA's chief officer of new payment technologies, is prohibited by SEPTA rules from working on the SEPTA project for one year for his new employer, LTK Engineering Services of Ambler. A SEPTA spokesman said McGee's departure would not further delay the installation of the smart-card system, which will replace tokens, passes, transfers, and tickets on SEPTA's buses, subways, trolleys and, eventually, Regional Rail trains.
NEWS
April 13, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Hanson, the new chief executive of the Delaware River Port Authority, has been spending Friday afternoons far from his Camden corner office overlooking Philadelphia and the river. With a fluorescent green vest over his suit jacket, he has been at the crowded Eighth and Market station beneath Center City, herding passengers onto packed PATCO trains. "There's room in this car," he called on a recent Friday as he and other DRPA executives joined PATCO workers to ease crowding caused by a construction project on the Benjamin Franklin Bridge.
NEWS
April 7, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - On the last day of the workweek before legislators returned to their districts, four Philadelphia Democrats who reportedly took envelopes of cash from a lobbyist were on the job, doing the people's business. Rep. Michelle Brownlee, who sources say got $2,000, stepped to her usual seat on the House floor. Rep. Vanessa Brown, who accepted $4,000, according to investigative documents, stood smiling and chatting with colleagues, her arm on their backs. Rep. Ronald Waters, who collected multiple payments totaling $7,650, according to sources, strode through the Rotunda.
NEWS
April 6, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The economy has generated enough private-sector jobs to replace all those lost during the recession, according to data released Friday by the U.S. Labor Department. That was the headline news in an otherwise solid, but unremarkable, report. The unemployment rate remained unchanged at 6.7 percent, and payroll jobs were up by 192,000 in March. In March, private-sector, nongovernmental jobs edged just above 116 million. Such jobs numbered just below 116 million when the recession began in December 2007.
NEWS
April 4, 2014
NOW that the Supreme Court has loosened the spigot of money flowing to Congress and other elected officials in its McCutcheon decision this week, maybe we'll finally start getting really outraged at the callousness with which these lawmakers treat Americans. Case in point: the intractability of the House to consider renewing the unemployment benefits for the 2 million Americans who saw theirs expire last year. The Senate this week finally paved the way for a vote to approve renewal, but the House shows no sign of rushing to fix this; in fact, House Speaker John Boehner recently suggested it was too complicated for computers to handle the programming required to restore back payments.
NEWS
April 3, 2014 | By Seth Zweifler, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA On a grassy field outside the Philadelphia Industrial Correctional Center, where the windows are narrow, the brick walls run high, and the barbed wire seems to twist around the metal fences forever, inmate Joseph Saunders stood shoulder to shoulder Tuesday with Mayor Nutter. Saunders, 30, told the mayor of his plans after June, when he is set to be released from prison, after a yearlong burglary sentence. "I want to start my own composting business," he said. "And it's because of my 10 months here.
NEWS
March 29, 2014
The Give America a Raise bus tour stopped at Eakins Oval in Philadelphia Thursday. Like the protesters who held a rally outside a North Philadelphia McDonald's earlier this month, the group is traveling across the country urging an increase in the federal minimum wage. More importantly, the demonstrators are focusing attention on the need to change how all American workers are regarded and paid. It's time to stop derisively viewing fast-food workers as "burger flippers. " The term doesn't do justice to workers whose pay means much more to the U.S. economy now that millions of higher-paying manufacturing jobs have traveled overseas.
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