FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 19, 2011 | By Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele
Washington is obsessed with the budget deficit. It's all that lawmakers can talk about. The hysteria is such that they can't even agree on raising the ceiling on the national debt. As for how much to cut out of the budget, some would settle on reduced spending in the billions. Others want much more. As one headline summed it up: "[House Speaker John] Boehner demands 'trillions' in spending cuts in exchange for lifting debt ceiling. " There's only one problem: Congress is wrought up over the wrong deficit.
NEWS
February 12, 2008
By Dominic Pileggi There is a lot of good happening in my hometown of Chester, the oldest city in Pennsylvania. But as Chester continues to recover from the dramatic loss of industrial and manufacturing jobs, and the loss of half its population - about 38,000 people - between 1950 and 2000, government must work with companies to plant the seeds of long-lasting revitalization in the city as it has with other older waterfront communities in Delaware County....
NEWS
January 13, 2012 | By Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
GREER, S.C. - Facing efforts by his Republican rivals to paint him as a heartless corporate raider who preyed on struggling companies while working in private equity, Republican front-runner Mitt Romney stepped up his defense of his tenure at Bain Capital on Thursday, arguing that his goal had been to make businesses successful over the long term. Supporters of former House Speaker Newt Gingrich have promised a "strong and sustained" campaign in the Palmetto State attacking Romney's career at Bain.
NEWS
April 7, 2006
PRESIDENT Bush must be going crazy trying to understand the American public. First George W. ships a lot of good jobs overseas during his administration, and the people complain that we are losing good jobs here. Then he tries to bring in and legitimize the illegal aliens already here in order to do jobs that are still here and have those jobs stay here. The people complain about that, too. What do Americans want? Mayer Krain Philadelphia
NEWS
February 4, 2010 | FATIMAH ALI
THE president finally understands that creating jobs trumps everything else on his plate, and I expect him to make some fast progress fixing the broken economy. There are far too many people underwater economically, with only a few gasps of air left. From the outset of his administration, it was obvious that getting the economy on track and putting Americans back to work should have topped President Obama's agenda. I'm still scratching my head over why he thought people without jobs would be more concerned about health insurance than working, when they're just trying to keep a roof over their heads and buy groceries.
NEWS
January 30, 2008
AGAIN, the anti-casino folks think they're winning the battle to delay the SugarHouse Casino. Residents who want this development have not only lived in Philadelphia all of their lives but many have lived in Fishtown all of their lives. We don't come from Boston or Ohio. We don't need another park or condo! We need something that will generate money and give us jobs! Donna Tomlinson, Board Member Fishtown Action
NEWS
June 14, 2006 | By Peter A. Gold
Besides providing higher education in its classrooms, Rutgers University is an active partner for economic growth in New Jersey and the region. One example of that is the Rutgers-Camden Technology Campus Inc., a mixed-use business incubator that is generating the jobs, new business and innovations needed to create a diverse economic base. Currently home to 50 businesses (35 on-site and 15 virtual tenants), the incubator has netted exceptional economic development results during the last three years.
NEWS
June 20, 2003
Tell us a story that sums up your most memorable summer job experience, whether good, bad or somewhere in between. What did you learn about yourself or the working life in general? Send essays of 200 to 300 words to Voices/Jobs, The Inquirer, 800 River Rd., Conshohocken, Pa. 19428. Send e-mail to pavoices@phillynews.com or faxes to 610-313-8243. Questions? Call Kevin Ferris, Pennsylvania Voices editor, at 610-313-8202.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2004 | By Thomas J. Brady INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Xlibris Corp., a Philadelphia book publisher, has laid off about 35 customer-service workers and moved the jobs to the Philippines. By relocating the work to a country where wages are lower, the company can triple the number of people doing similar work for the company, John Feldcamp, Xlibris chief executive officer, said yesterday. The jobs here paid about $24,000 a year. In the Philippines, he said, salaries for replacement workers are about one-fifth of that. "It was an act of necessity, not of greed," he said.
NEWS
May 17, 2002 | By PATRICK B. GILLESPIE
WHEN PEOPLE ASK me why I am supporting Ed Rendell for governor, I have a one-word answer: "Jobs. " Pennsylvania needs them. Ed Rendell knows how to help create them. There are 76,000 fewer Pennsylvanians working today than there were just one year ago. Pennsylvania workers need a governor who is committed to putting people to work at good, high-wage jobs. Ed Rendell not only has a plan to do that, but he is the only candidate for governor who has a record of actually putting people back to work.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
February 20, 2015 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
SOURCES familiar with the situation have indicated that former Penn football coach Al Bagnoli could soon take the same position at Columbia, only 3 months after he retired following a 23-year run that produced a record nine outright Ivy League championships. Those people said Bagnoli is scheduled to meet with new Columbia athletic director Peter Pilling and university president Lee Bollinger this week. If an agreement can be worked out, Bagnoli would become the Lions' new coach next week.
NEWS
February 19, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden officials on Tuesday announced a new job-training program they said would connect local companies with city residents and prepare workers for jobs in construction, building trades, and other fields. The program, which is funded by a $500,000 grant from the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, is also aimed at preparing residents for job opportunities that may arise as companies start relocating to Camden in the years to come. The money will go to establishing apprenticeships and training through Camden County College, labor unions, and the business community, said U.S. Rep. Donald Norcross, one of the officials who spoke Tuesday afternoon at a news conference at Camden's Malandra Hall community center.
NEWS
February 17, 2015 | BY JOEL MATHIS & BEN BOYCHUK, Tribune News Service
COMEDIAN Jon Stewart, longtime host of Comedy Central's "Daily Show," announced last week that he would be "retiring" from the program before the end of the year. National news outlets from coast to coast reported the announcement as breaking news, and the New York Times dubbed Stewart "the nation's satirist in chief. " Stewart has hosted the daily satirical "fake news" show for 16 years, though the program has often been credited with - or accused of - serving up real news to a mostly young audience.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2015 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Job-market improvements mean more people feel free to change jobs. But leaving a job can be difficult, even on the best of terms. Here are some guidelines for making a graceful exit. "Since the days of being loyal to one organization for an entire career are long gone, moving from one company to another is something that all of us will probably do," writes Ron Ashkenas, a contributor at Forbes.com. But, he asks in this post, "why do talented, bright, and capable people figuratively burn their bridges behind them?"
NEWS
February 13, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
Assemblyman John J. Burzichelli, a seasoned official with 13 years of legislative service under his belt, will triple his taxpayer-funded income this year with a second public job. Burzichelli, who is paid $49,000 as an assemblyman, a part-time job, will earn $100,000 as director of project management with the Gloucester County Improvement Authority, a job for which he was hired last month, officials said. Hires of this sort are lawful, but have drawn criticism from state government-ethics advocates.
NEWS
February 13, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
A group of Camden dispatchers who handle emergency calls to county police fear an evaluation of the unit could put them out of work. City Council this week authorized a request for proposals to determine whether if Camden could provide better service for less money using a contractor. City spokesman Vincent Basara said that the city is simply seeking to review the cost efficiency of the unit, and that any future action would go before Council for discussion. But the president of Communications Workers of America Local 1014, representing the dispatchers, said members worry that the city is looking to phase them out. "They need experienced, professional dispatchers, and that is who our members are," Karl Walko said Wednesday.
NEWS
February 9, 2015 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Controversy has nipped at Erik Arneson's heels over the nearly two decades he served as a spokesman for Senate Republicans. His first boss, Sen. David "Chip" Brightbill, became majority leader after his predecessor was sent to jail for corruption. Brightbill, of Lebanon County, was ousted in 2006 over an ill-fated legislative pay raise. And Arneson's last boss, Sen. Dominic Pileggi of Delaware County, was pushed out as majority leader in a coup last fall. But now Arneson, 44, for years the affable face of Senate Republicans, is at the center of his own high-profile storm.
NEWS
February 9, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter wants Philadelphians to take a look at the numbers and see how their city has done over the last seven years with him at the helm. The murder rate has hit a historic low, jobs have trickled back into town, and the city is putting more money into its schools than at any time in 30 years. Experts eye those numbers and say yes, but consider: Crime fell nationwide, as did joblessness. The schools are running on bare-bones budgets, and Philadelphia still has the highest poverty rate among big cities.
NEWS
February 8, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The nation's payrolls grew by 257,000 jobs in January, but Friday's good news from the U.S. Labor Department did not seem to have reached the Deb Shops warehouse in Northeast Philadelphia. In December, when the company declared bankruptcy, more than 274 people worked there, in headquarters positions as well as in packing and sorting teen-fashion merchandise to be shipped to hundreds of Deb Shops stores around the country. On Friday, only about 10 people remained to clean up. "This is our severance," said a person who answered the phone, but declined to give a name.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The $3 billion Mariner East project linking the Marcellus Shale region to the Philadelphia area is expected to generate widespread economic benefits, according to a study released Thursday by the pipeline's builders. The study, by Econsult Solutions Inc., says the project will generate a one-time economic impact of $4.2 billion to Pennsylvania's economy, support more than 30,000 jobs during the two-year construction period, and create about 300 to 400 permanent jobs. Econsult said a "majority" of the economic impact would be in Southeastern Pennsylvania, where the project's builder, Sunoco Logistics Partners L.P., is developing the former Marcus Hook refinery in Delaware County to receive, store, and process the liquid fuels that will be delivered through the cross-state pipeline.
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