FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 19, 2011 | By Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele
Washington is obsessed with the budget deficit. It's all that lawmakers can talk about. The hysteria is such that they can't even agree on raising the ceiling on the national debt. As for how much to cut out of the budget, some would settle on reduced spending in the billions. Others want much more. As one headline summed it up: "[House Speaker John] Boehner demands 'trillions' in spending cuts in exchange for lifting debt ceiling. " There's only one problem: Congress is wrought up over the wrong deficit.
NEWS
February 12, 2008
By Dominic Pileggi There is a lot of good happening in my hometown of Chester, the oldest city in Pennsylvania. But as Chester continues to recover from the dramatic loss of industrial and manufacturing jobs, and the loss of half its population - about 38,000 people - between 1950 and 2000, government must work with companies to plant the seeds of long-lasting revitalization in the city as it has with other older waterfront communities in Delaware County....
NEWS
January 13, 2012 | By Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
GREER, S.C. - Facing efforts by his Republican rivals to paint him as a heartless corporate raider who preyed on struggling companies while working in private equity, Republican front-runner Mitt Romney stepped up his defense of his tenure at Bain Capital on Thursday, arguing that his goal had been to make businesses successful over the long term. Supporters of former House Speaker Newt Gingrich have promised a "strong and sustained" campaign in the Palmetto State attacking Romney's career at Bain.
NEWS
April 7, 2006
PRESIDENT Bush must be going crazy trying to understand the American public. First George W. ships a lot of good jobs overseas during his administration, and the people complain that we are losing good jobs here. Then he tries to bring in and legitimize the illegal aliens already here in order to do jobs that are still here and have those jobs stay here. The people complain about that, too. What do Americans want? Mayer Krain Philadelphia
NEWS
February 4, 2010 | FATIMAH ALI
THE president finally understands that creating jobs trumps everything else on his plate, and I expect him to make some fast progress fixing the broken economy. There are far too many people underwater economically, with only a few gasps of air left. From the outset of his administration, it was obvious that getting the economy on track and putting Americans back to work should have topped President Obama's agenda. I'm still scratching my head over why he thought people without jobs would be more concerned about health insurance than working, when they're just trying to keep a roof over their heads and buy groceries.
NEWS
January 30, 2008
AGAIN, the anti-casino folks think they're winning the battle to delay the SugarHouse Casino. Residents who want this development have not only lived in Philadelphia all of their lives but many have lived in Fishtown all of their lives. We don't come from Boston or Ohio. We don't need another park or condo! We need something that will generate money and give us jobs! Donna Tomlinson, Board Member Fishtown Action
NEWS
June 14, 2006 | By Peter A. Gold
Besides providing higher education in its classrooms, Rutgers University is an active partner for economic growth in New Jersey and the region. One example of that is the Rutgers-Camden Technology Campus Inc., a mixed-use business incubator that is generating the jobs, new business and innovations needed to create a diverse economic base. Currently home to 50 businesses (35 on-site and 15 virtual tenants), the incubator has netted exceptional economic development results during the last three years.
NEWS
June 20, 2003
Tell us a story that sums up your most memorable summer job experience, whether good, bad or somewhere in between. What did you learn about yourself or the working life in general? Send essays of 200 to 300 words to Voices/Jobs, The Inquirer, 800 River Rd., Conshohocken, Pa. 19428. Send e-mail to pavoices@phillynews.com or faxes to 610-313-8243. Questions? Call Kevin Ferris, Pennsylvania Voices editor, at 610-313-8202.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2004 | By Thomas J. Brady INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Xlibris Corp., a Philadelphia book publisher, has laid off about 35 customer-service workers and moved the jobs to the Philippines. By relocating the work to a country where wages are lower, the company can triple the number of people doing similar work for the company, John Feldcamp, Xlibris chief executive officer, said yesterday. The jobs here paid about $24,000 a year. In the Philippines, he said, salaries for replacement workers are about one-fifth of that. "It was an act of necessity, not of greed," he said.
NEWS
May 17, 2002 | By PATRICK B. GILLESPIE
WHEN PEOPLE ASK me why I am supporting Ed Rendell for governor, I have a one-word answer: "Jobs. " Pennsylvania needs them. Ed Rendell knows how to help create them. There are 76,000 fewer Pennsylvanians working today than there were just one year ago. Pennsylvania workers need a governor who is committed to putting people to work at good, high-wage jobs. Ed Rendell not only has a plan to do that, but he is the only candidate for governor who has a record of actually putting people back to work.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 30, 2014 | By Brielle Urciuoli, Inquirer Staff Writer
It has been a rough two years for Scott Smith of National Park since he lost his job in manufacturing. However, he remained optimistic Tuesday alongside the other hopeful candidates who filled the Collingswood Grand Ballroom at the Camden County Job Fair. "I'm looking for anything," said Smith, 55. "Two years is a long time. " While the attendees looking for a job represented a wide spread of age and education levels, the potential employers were no less diverse. More than 100 companies, from newspapers to Pepsi-Cola, were looking for candidates to hire.
NEWS
October 29, 2014
THIS JUST IN: Mike Stack might be French. The Northeast Philly ward leader, state Senator, Democratic candidate for lieutenant governor and grandson of an Irish immigrant is exhibiting Francophilic tendencies. He's talking of keeping his Senate seat while also serving as lieutenant governor if he wins that post next week as Tom Wolf's running mate. Two elected jobs? In France, it's not uncommon. It's known as cumul des mandats , "accumulation of mandates," a practice of holding two or more elective offices.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
To chief executive Sue Schick, it's a continuing mystery. Why are there so few women on corporate boards? Why are there so few top women executives? Why are so few women ranked among the top earners? And if major nonprofit organizations seem comfortable with female leadership, why can't that confidence translate to more business leadership spots for women? "Inertia," said Schick, chief executive of UnitedHealthcare Pennsylvania and Delaware, a publicly traded health insurance company that has more than 5,000 employees and covers more than 900,000 people.
SPORTS
October 17, 2014 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chris Pronger is as feisty off the ice as he was during his playing days. The former defenseman bristled at the suggestion that, by taking a job with the NHL's player-safety department on Friday, it is a conflict of interest because he is being paid by the Flyers for the next three seasons. Pronger said that he is "merely a sounding board" for Stephane Quintal, the NHL's senior vice president of player safety, and that Quintal will hand out disciplinary measures. Pronger will not be permitted to make disciplinary recommendations on incidents involving the Flyers.
SPORTS
October 17, 2014 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
ABOUT THIS time a year ago, there were at least a few Temple folks wondering if Matt Rhule was the right guy to coach the Owls' football team. And definitely many more than a few who were questioning Rhule's choice of making well-traveled veteran Phil Snow his defensive coordinator. But that's what can happen when you lose your first six and opponents keep converting long passes at the end of a lot of those games to erase whatever good had come before. "My oldest boy said, 'Dad, do you read message boards?
SPORTS
October 14, 2014 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Staff Writer
NOBODY EXPECTS Nick Foles to be the perfect quarterback, well at least nobody except for the most extreme critic. But Foles doesn't have to play perfect - the Eagles don't need that. What Eagles fans have been waiting to see from Foles has been consistency, signs that last year's remarkable season when he led the NFL in passer rating was not an aberration but the rise of a young field general. More than anything, it has been the up-and-down play of Foles through the first quarter of the season that has kept Birds fans from fully enjoying a start that has been as good as any top team in the NFL. And for nearly 28 1/2 minutes of the first half of last night's huge NFC East clash with the New York Giants, Eagles fans were satisfied because Foles was playing some of his best football of the season.
NEWS
October 13, 2014 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
Stephen Klasko hadn't been running the Thomas Jefferson University empire for long before his thoughts turned to Sidney Kimmel. A Philadelphia native who became a billionaire in the fashion industry, Kimmel had given generously to Jefferson in the 1990s but not much since despite funding the performing arts center that bears his name. But Klasko, who last month hit the one-year mark as university president and health system chief executive officer, knew Kimmel had built Jones New York by aggressively expanding and thinking outside the box. So his hunch was the two would get along.
SPORTS
October 11, 2014 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even though Chris Pronger is still on the Flyers' payroll, NHL commissioner Gary Bettman said he wouldn't have a problem if the onetime defensive standout worked in the league's player-safety department. And that's apparently what happened Thursday night, when Pronger was hired, according to TSN, which also reported that he remained on the Flyers' long-term injured list, meaning the team would still get $4.9 million in salary-cap relief. The Flyers owe Pronger a total of $5.15 million for the final three years of his contract.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Northern California man who says he was fired after Comcast Corp. contacted his employer wants his name cleared and has threatened to file a lawsuit next week against the cable giant, his lawyer, Maureen Pettibone Ryan, said Thursday. The case of Conal O'Rourke, of Santa Clara, is Comcast's latest customer service fiasco to go viral as the nation's largest cable company seeks regulatory approval for its $45.2 billion acquisition of Time Warner Cable Inc. After being unable to resolve a billing problem in California, O'Rourke contacted Comcast's headquarters in Philadelphia twice in February about $312.50 in overcharges, Ryan said in a phone interview.
SPORTS
October 10, 2014 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
DESPITE THE fact that he is still on the Flyers' payroll, Chris Pronger will have direct input on any supplemental discipline handed out this season. The NHL is expected to announce Pronger's hiring today in the Department of Player Safety, confirming a TSN report. The league did not return an official request for comment last night. Unfortunately for the Flyers and their bean counters, the team will still be on the hook for the remaining $5.15 million in salary due to him. Pronger, who turns 40 today, also will remain on the Flyers' long-term injury list and the team will receive a salary-cap cushion equal to his $4.94 million salary-cap hit to use on a replacement player.
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