FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
February 24, 2013 | By Joseph Santoliquito, For the Daily News
By Joseph Santoliquito   They never heard the faded wood creaking under their mother's shuffling, swollen feet each morning when she arrived home exhausted from one of her jobs. Rylanda Hollis could barely keep her eyes open and barely had time to close them for a few hours before waking her sons for school and beginning the arduous routine again. Rahlir and Rondae Hollis-Jefferson never saw the times when their mother was crying instead of resting. She wanted so much for them that it hurt.
NEWS
June 19, 2011 | By Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele
Washington is obsessed with the budget deficit. It's all that lawmakers can talk about. The hysteria is such that they can't even agree on raising the ceiling on the national debt. As for how much to cut out of the budget, some would settle on reduced spending in the billions. Others want much more. As one headline summed it up: "[House Speaker John] Boehner demands 'trillions' in spending cuts in exchange for lifting debt ceiling. " There's only one problem: Congress is wrought up over the wrong deficit.
NEWS
February 12, 2008
By Dominic Pileggi There is a lot of good happening in my hometown of Chester, the oldest city in Pennsylvania. But as Chester continues to recover from the dramatic loss of industrial and manufacturing jobs, and the loss of half its population - about 38,000 people - between 1950 and 2000, government must work with companies to plant the seeds of long-lasting revitalization in the city as it has with other older waterfront communities in Delaware County....
NEWS
April 7, 2006
PRESIDENT Bush must be going crazy trying to understand the American public. First George W. ships a lot of good jobs overseas during his administration, and the people complain that we are losing good jobs here. Then he tries to bring in and legitimize the illegal aliens already here in order to do jobs that are still here and have those jobs stay here. The people complain about that, too. What do Americans want? Mayer Krain Philadelphia
NEWS
February 4, 2010 | FATIMAH ALI
THE president finally understands that creating jobs trumps everything else on his plate, and I expect him to make some fast progress fixing the broken economy. There are far too many people underwater economically, with only a few gasps of air left. From the outset of his administration, it was obvious that getting the economy on track and putting Americans back to work should have topped President Obama's agenda. I'm still scratching my head over why he thought people without jobs would be more concerned about health insurance than working, when they're just trying to keep a roof over their heads and buy groceries.
NEWS
January 13, 2012 | By Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
GREER, S.C. - Facing efforts by his Republican rivals to paint him as a heartless corporate raider who preyed on struggling companies while working in private equity, Republican front-runner Mitt Romney stepped up his defense of his tenure at Bain Capital on Thursday, arguing that his goal had been to make businesses successful over the long term. Supporters of former House Speaker Newt Gingrich have promised a "strong and sustained" campaign in the Palmetto State attacking Romney's career at Bain.
NEWS
January 30, 2008
AGAIN, the anti-casino folks think they're winning the battle to delay the SugarHouse Casino. Residents who want this development have not only lived in Philadelphia all of their lives but many have lived in Fishtown all of their lives. We don't come from Boston or Ohio. We don't need another park or condo! We need something that will generate money and give us jobs! Donna Tomlinson, Board Member Fishtown Action
NEWS
June 14, 2006 | By Peter A. Gold
Besides providing higher education in its classrooms, Rutgers University is an active partner for economic growth in New Jersey and the region. One example of that is the Rutgers-Camden Technology Campus Inc., a mixed-use business incubator that is generating the jobs, new business and innovations needed to create a diverse economic base. Currently home to 50 businesses (35 on-site and 15 virtual tenants), the incubator has netted exceptional economic development results during the last three years.
NEWS
June 20, 2003
Tell us a story that sums up your most memorable summer job experience, whether good, bad or somewhere in between. What did you learn about yourself or the working life in general? Send essays of 200 to 300 words to Voices/Jobs, The Inquirer, 800 River Rd., Conshohocken, Pa. 19428. Send e-mail to pavoices@phillynews.com or faxes to 610-313-8243. Questions? Call Kevin Ferris, Pennsylvania Voices editor, at 610-313-8202.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2004 | By Thomas J. Brady INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Xlibris Corp., a Philadelphia book publisher, has laid off about 35 customer-service workers and moved the jobs to the Philippines. By relocating the work to a country where wages are lower, the company can triple the number of people doing similar work for the company, John Feldcamp, Xlibris chief executive officer, said yesterday. The jobs here paid about $24,000 a year. In the Philippines, he said, salaries for replacement workers are about one-fifth of that. "It was an act of necessity, not of greed," he said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
March 22, 2015 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
EDMONTON, Alberta - The Flyers are broken, and it would be surprising if the organization doesn't hire another coach to try to put them back together. Coach Craig Berube is a good hockey man with strong principles, but he has lost this flawed team. Many of the players are upset with Berube's singling out goalie Steve Mason three times in the team's eighth consecutive road loss, a 4-1 defeat in Calgary on Thursday. Berube has not seen eye-to-eye with Mason recently, and he seemingly took it out on his goalie Thursday by pulling him late in the second period after Mason allowed the second goal on a shot he still hasn't seen.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia home health care company indicted for Medicaid fraud in early February has ceased operations, costing 1,324 people their jobs - the largest of several recent layoffs in Southeastern Pennsylvania. Infinite Care Inc. filed a required notice with the commonwealth's Department of Labor and Industry that it would close its facility on Rising Sun Avenue. A letter dated March 4 mentioned "unforeseen business circumstances" related to the state health department's ordering the company to cease operations.
BUSINESS
March 18, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
So far, David Fleming hasn't had much trouble finding workers for his fourth-generation family business, Shady Brook Farm in Yardley. But then again, Fleming and his family aren't taking any chances. Six years ago, they opened a farmers' market at Delaware Valley College, a school near Doylestown that is traditionally strong in agriculture. "It was definitely access to the talent," Fleming said. On Monday, Fleming talked about farm hiring as part of an employers' panel at the college's student center, the kickoff site of Bucks County AgConnect.
NEWS
March 16, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Labor Department jobs reports are glowing - unemployment down to 5.5 percent last month and a robust 295,000 jobs added to the nation's payrolls. Even in the Philadelphia suburbs, the latest figures show the rate even lower, at 5 percent. But why, if everything is so good, are monthly sessions packed at My Career Transitions, a local networking group of volunteers who help people looking for work? "It's not as rosy as the numbers indicate," said Michael Hughes. "I see new faces every month.
NEWS
March 13, 2015
ISSUE | TRADE DEALS Job exporter Trade deficits have been destroying jobs for 40 consecutive years, but Andrew Nuffer suggests Congress and President Obama reauthorize fast-track trade legislation ("Increased trade brings jobs, benefits to state, Phila.," March 6). Fast track limits negotiating to the president and a few handpicked cronies. Trade deficits continue to ship jobs overseas. Congress should reject fast-track authority and fight to save our jobs and protect the middle class.
NEWS
March 9, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The heinous murder of Officer Robert Wilson III is another jarring reminder of what is at stake when a man or woman puts on a badge and takes an oath to protect and serve the rest of us. In the context of recent protests of alleged police misconduct in places like Ferguson, Mo., and Staten Island, N.Y., Officer Wilson's sacrifice takes on even greater significance. Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey alluded to those incidents in praising Officer Wilson, who was fatally shot while stopping an attempted robbery Thursday in North Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 9, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the nation's payrolls expanding by 295,000 jobs in all sectors, the U.S. unemployment rate hit a new postrecession low in February, reaching 5.5 percent, the Labor Department reported Friday. "We're getting jobs. There's definitely a difference," said John Dodds, director of the Philadelphia Unemployment Project, an advocacy group for low-wage workers. "Wages are still not up," Dodds noted. It is telling that nationwide - at Walmart, in last week's rallies at City Hall and in Harrisburg, at protests near fast-food restaurants, even in Gov. Wolf's first budget address - the focus has shifted from gaining jobs to building paychecks.
BUSINESS
March 8, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
SAP SE, the German-based business-software company with North American headquarters in Newtown Square, says it will cut 2,200 of its 74,400 worldwide jobs as it pushes cloud-based and in-memory-database services to offset the drop in sales growth for enterprise software systems. But the company, which employs 2,500 in Newtown Square, is still hiring. SAP had 50,000 employees in 2010 and about 66,000 by the end of 2013; head count has risen since then. "We're looking for people who can contribute to growth," and who have "networks" of business contacts to whom they can sell SAP services, spokesman Andy Kendzie said.
NEWS
March 8, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Ted Dallas knew he was walking into a crisis the late-January day he accepted the job as Pennsylvania's acting secretary of the Department of Human Services. He knew that, since early December, thousands of Pennsylvanians with alcohol and drug addictions had been locked out of treatment centers. And he understood the seriousness of their situation. "For folks in the drug and alcohol world, that continuity of care and the wraparound services and keeping it consistent is particularly important," Dallas said.
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