FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
August 3, 2015 | By Joel Wee and Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writers
First in an occasional series. Baby boomers, the generation that brought America cable television, middle-class pot smoking, and the two-car garage, are now bringing the nation the jobs of the future. The boomers, as they grow older and more infirm, will need home health aides, personal care aides, registered nurses, and physical therapists - jobs that the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics says will be among the fastest growing in the next seven years. "It's about . . . these aging baby boomers," among other trends, said labor economist Paul Harrington, director of Drexel University's Center for Labor Markets and Policy.
NEWS
June 19, 2011 | By Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele
Washington is obsessed with the budget deficit. It's all that lawmakers can talk about. The hysteria is such that they can't even agree on raising the ceiling on the national debt. As for how much to cut out of the budget, some would settle on reduced spending in the billions. Others want much more. As one headline summed it up: "[House Speaker John] Boehner demands 'trillions' in spending cuts in exchange for lifting debt ceiling. " There's only one problem: Congress is wrought up over the wrong deficit.
NEWS
February 12, 2008
By Dominic Pileggi There is a lot of good happening in my hometown of Chester, the oldest city in Pennsylvania. But as Chester continues to recover from the dramatic loss of industrial and manufacturing jobs, and the loss of half its population - about 38,000 people - between 1950 and 2000, government must work with companies to plant the seeds of long-lasting revitalization in the city as it has with other older waterfront communities in Delaware County....
NEWS
April 7, 2006
PRESIDENT Bush must be going crazy trying to understand the American public. First George W. ships a lot of good jobs overseas during his administration, and the people complain that we are losing good jobs here. Then he tries to bring in and legitimize the illegal aliens already here in order to do jobs that are still here and have those jobs stay here. The people complain about that, too. What do Americans want? Mayer Krain Philadelphia
NEWS
February 4, 2010 | FATIMAH ALI
THE president finally understands that creating jobs trumps everything else on his plate, and I expect him to make some fast progress fixing the broken economy. There are far too many people underwater economically, with only a few gasps of air left. From the outset of his administration, it was obvious that getting the economy on track and putting Americans back to work should have topped President Obama's agenda. I'm still scratching my head over why he thought people without jobs would be more concerned about health insurance than working, when they're just trying to keep a roof over their heads and buy groceries.
NEWS
January 30, 2008
AGAIN, the anti-casino folks think they're winning the battle to delay the SugarHouse Casino. Residents who want this development have not only lived in Philadelphia all of their lives but many have lived in Fishtown all of their lives. We don't come from Boston or Ohio. We don't need another park or condo! We need something that will generate money and give us jobs! Donna Tomlinson, Board Member Fishtown Action
NEWS
January 13, 2012 | By Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
GREER, S.C. - Facing efforts by his Republican rivals to paint him as a heartless corporate raider who preyed on struggling companies while working in private equity, Republican front-runner Mitt Romney stepped up his defense of his tenure at Bain Capital on Thursday, arguing that his goal had been to make businesses successful over the long term. Supporters of former House Speaker Newt Gingrich have promised a "strong and sustained" campaign in the Palmetto State attacking Romney's career at Bain.
NEWS
July 17, 2015
J OSEPH DOUGHERTY, the 73-year-old former labor leader awaiting sentencing next week on a federal racketeering conviction, just found out the hard way that not even Shakespeare can soften the blow of a judge's gavel. U.S. District Judge Michael Baylson yesterday rejected Dougherty's Hail Mary motion for an acquittal or a new trial. Baylson began the ruling thusly: "Who finds the heifer dead and bleeding fresh, And sees fast by a butcher with an axe, But will suspect 'twas he that made the slaughter?"
NEWS
June 14, 2006 | By Peter A. Gold
Besides providing higher education in its classrooms, Rutgers University is an active partner for economic growth in New Jersey and the region. One example of that is the Rutgers-Camden Technology Campus Inc., a mixed-use business incubator that is generating the jobs, new business and innovations needed to create a diverse economic base. Currently home to 50 businesses (35 on-site and 15 virtual tenants), the incubator has netted exceptional economic development results during the last three years.
NEWS
June 20, 2003
Tell us a story that sums up your most memorable summer job experience, whether good, bad or somewhere in between. What did you learn about yourself or the working life in general? Send essays of 200 to 300 words to Voices/Jobs, The Inquirer, 800 River Rd., Conshohocken, Pa. 19428. Send e-mail to pavoices@phillynews.com or faxes to 610-313-8243. Questions? Call Kevin Ferris, Pennsylvania Voices editor, at 610-313-8202.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 21, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
WANT AN EASY $200? Borrow a tow truck and put up a no-parking sign. Then watch the bucks roll in from people like Samantha Zeno. She lives with her husband and four kids on Richmond Street near Lefevre in Bridesburg. It's up the block from the defunct Philadelphia Coke Co. - an overgrown, 67-acre former riverfront coal refinery that's uninhabited except on nice weekends when drunken teens get hammered in its jungle. Midway down the plant's fenced-in Richmond Street boundary is a gated entrance that locals say hasn't been used in decades.
SPORTS
August 18, 2015 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
They did not chant his name, or give him a standing ovation, or stay out in the heat for an extra two hours just to say they saw him rumble into the end zone against a defense loaded with hangers-on and roster fodder. They did all those things for the man who followed him. Matt Barkley jogged onto Lincoln Financial Field in relative silence, his entrance into the Eagles' 36-10 preseason victory over the Colts just the opening act for Tim Tebow's return to the NFL, as if Barkley were an acoustic singer-songwriter warming up the crowd for the E Street Band.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2015 | By Joel Wee, Inquirer Staff Writer
One in an occasional series The nation's future cyber sleuths are in training in a third-floor classroom in Drexel University's Bossone Hall. Even as security breaches make headlines - the alleged Chinese hack attack on the U.S. government's federal personnel records in June, the compromise of 1.1 million Neiman Marcus credit cards in January - Kapil Dandekar's wireless network security class practices hacking into and defending make-believe information networks and communication systems.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Merck & Co. has cut 1,950 jobs in the first six months of the year as part of two cost-cutting programs announced in 2010 and 2013, and the near-term pain might not be over. When the massive layoff rounds overlap, the accounting can be more complicated. That was evident in the quarterly statement filed by Merck with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Merck said in the SEC filing that 1,210 jobs or vacancies likely will be displaced via one program in the last six months of 2015.
NEWS
August 11, 2015
ISSUE | SHALE TAX Levy means job loss It is dangerously misleading to ignore the fact that even higher energy taxes jeopardize jobs ("How Pa. can get severance tax right," Aug. 2). Responsible shale development is driving a petrochemical rebirth, specifically at Marcus Hook. Sunoco Logistics' Mariner East 2 pipeline is expected to support an estimated 30,000 construction jobs, generate nearly $62 million in tax revenues, and provide $4.2 billion in economic activity. In addition to the more than $2.3 billion in taxes paid by the natural gas industry since 2008, Pennsylvania imposes a shale-gas impact tax that's generated more than $850 million since 2011 for communities throughout the commonwealth.
SPORTS
August 11, 2015 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
SAN DIEGO - Odubel Herrera wasted little time extending his season-high, 12-game hitting streak. He took the second pitch he saw from San Diego starter Andrew Cashner yesterday and ripped it into rightfield for a single in the opening inning of the Phillies' 5-3 win. In his third at-bat, Herrera took Cashner a little deeper - his sixth home run of the season landed deep into the second section of seats beyond the rightfield fence at Petco Park....
BUSINESS
August 9, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Statistics in Friday's employment report from the U.S. Labor Department point to an economy humming along nicely: Employment was up by 215,000 jobs in July, with hires in nearly every major sector. The unemployment rate stayed the same at 5.3 percent. Employment numbers from previous months were revised upward, indicating more growth. But the statistics don't do much for housing supervisor Marian Gwadera, 55, who, on July 31, lost his job overseeing janitors at 2116 Chestnut St., thereby becoming one of the nation's nearly 8.3 million jobless.
NEWS
August 7, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - President Obama has nominated former Rep. Patrick Murphy of Bucks County to become undersecretary of the Army, the branch's second-highest ranking civilian position, the White House announced Wednesday. Murphy, a Bucks County Democrat who represented the Eighth District from 2007 to 2011, was the first veteran of the second Iraq War to be elected to Congress, where he sat on the Armed Services Committee and the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. Trained as a paratrooper with the Army's 82d Airborne Division, Murphy spent seven months in Iraq, starting in 2003, where he served as a convoy commander and lawyer in the Judge Advocate General's Corps.
NEWS
August 6, 2015
I'M JUST BACK from a week's vacation in North Wildwood and I'm happy to report there are still American college and high school kids working at jobs like servers in restaurants and life guards in a water park we visited.   Sadly, they are vastly outnumbered by an annual influx of foreign workers,mainly from Russia and surrounding central European countries. I don't think this is a good thing.I believe it plays into the great debate we're having over the manner in which legal and illegal workers are undercutting the American worker.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
One in an occasional series Brian Martin, 33, almost gave up on being a bricklayer during the recession. He loved the work but couldn't get any, so he joined the vast army of construction workers rendered jobless by the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression. "I thought about going back to school," said Martin, of Glenolden, taking a break from work at the University of Pennsylvania's newest dormitory, the New College House at Hill Field. Up on the scaffolding, Rocco D'Angelico, 59, said he managed to keep working as a bricklayer during the recession, but now he's looking toward retirement because of "all the aches and pains in my bones.
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