FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 19, 2011 | By Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele
Washington is obsessed with the budget deficit. It's all that lawmakers can talk about. The hysteria is such that they can't even agree on raising the ceiling on the national debt. As for how much to cut out of the budget, some would settle on reduced spending in the billions. Others want much more. As one headline summed it up: "[House Speaker John] Boehner demands 'trillions' in spending cuts in exchange for lifting debt ceiling. " There's only one problem: Congress is wrought up over the wrong deficit.
NEWS
February 12, 2008
By Dominic Pileggi There is a lot of good happening in my hometown of Chester, the oldest city in Pennsylvania. But as Chester continues to recover from the dramatic loss of industrial and manufacturing jobs, and the loss of half its population - about 38,000 people - between 1950 and 2000, government must work with companies to plant the seeds of long-lasting revitalization in the city as it has with other older waterfront communities in Delaware County....
NEWS
April 7, 2006
PRESIDENT Bush must be going crazy trying to understand the American public. First George W. ships a lot of good jobs overseas during his administration, and the people complain that we are losing good jobs here. Then he tries to bring in and legitimize the illegal aliens already here in order to do jobs that are still here and have those jobs stay here. The people complain about that, too. What do Americans want? Mayer Krain Philadelphia
NEWS
February 4, 2010 | FATIMAH ALI
THE president finally understands that creating jobs trumps everything else on his plate, and I expect him to make some fast progress fixing the broken economy. There are far too many people underwater economically, with only a few gasps of air left. From the outset of his administration, it was obvious that getting the economy on track and putting Americans back to work should have topped President Obama's agenda. I'm still scratching my head over why he thought people without jobs would be more concerned about health insurance than working, when they're just trying to keep a roof over their heads and buy groceries.
NEWS
January 30, 2008
AGAIN, the anti-casino folks think they're winning the battle to delay the SugarHouse Casino. Residents who want this development have not only lived in Philadelphia all of their lives but many have lived in Fishtown all of their lives. We don't come from Boston or Ohio. We don't need another park or condo! We need something that will generate money and give us jobs! Donna Tomlinson, Board Member Fishtown Action
NEWS
January 13, 2012 | By Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
GREER, S.C. - Facing efforts by his Republican rivals to paint him as a heartless corporate raider who preyed on struggling companies while working in private equity, Republican front-runner Mitt Romney stepped up his defense of his tenure at Bain Capital on Thursday, arguing that his goal had been to make businesses successful over the long term. Supporters of former House Speaker Newt Gingrich have promised a "strong and sustained" campaign in the Palmetto State attacking Romney's career at Bain.
NEWS
August 6, 2012
In "The Betrayal of the American Dream," Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele revisit their 1991 Inquirer series, "America: What Went Wrong," in which they forecast a decline of the middle class. Now, they document how actions going back three decades have left millions of Americans in economic ruin. Excerpts from their book continue in Currents every Sunday through Aug. 19.   Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele On his last day on the job, Kevin Flanagan, after clearing out a few personal effects and putting them in boxes in the back of his Ford Ranger, left the building where he'd worked for seven years.
NEWS
June 14, 2006 | By Peter A. Gold
Besides providing higher education in its classrooms, Rutgers University is an active partner for economic growth in New Jersey and the region. One example of that is the Rutgers-Camden Technology Campus Inc., a mixed-use business incubator that is generating the jobs, new business and innovations needed to create a diverse economic base. Currently home to 50 businesses (35 on-site and 15 virtual tenants), the incubator has netted exceptional economic development results during the last three years.
NEWS
June 20, 2003
Tell us a story that sums up your most memorable summer job experience, whether good, bad or somewhere in between. What did you learn about yourself or the working life in general? Send essays of 200 to 300 words to Voices/Jobs, The Inquirer, 800 River Rd., Conshohocken, Pa. 19428. Send e-mail to pavoices@phillynews.com or faxes to 610-313-8243. Questions? Call Kevin Ferris, Pennsylvania Voices editor, at 610-313-8202.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2004 | By Thomas J. Brady INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Xlibris Corp., a Philadelphia book publisher, has laid off about 35 customer-service workers and moved the jobs to the Philippines. By relocating the work to a country where wages are lower, the company can triple the number of people doing similar work for the company, John Feldcamp, Xlibris chief executive officer, said yesterday. The jobs here paid about $24,000 a year. In the Philippines, he said, salaries for replacement workers are about one-fifth of that. "It was an act of necessity, not of greed," he said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 21, 2015 | Will Bunch, Daily News Staff Writer
IN LESS THAN FIVE MONTHS, Jim Kenney went from nobody's short list to the brink of becoming Philadelphia's 99th mayor, and he did it with a coalition this city has never quite seen before: from union guys from the old neighborhood in South Philly to high-tech millennials, from black ward leaders in the Northwest to gay activists and fired-up schoolteachers. But seven months from now, winning yesterday's 2015 Democratic primary may be fondly remembered as "the easy part. " The coronation of the 56-year-old veteran City Council member isn't a done deal - there's a little-known GOP challenger and the possibility of an independent on the November ballot.
SPORTS
May 20, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Neil Theobald took over as Temple's president, arriving from Indiana University in January 2013, several athletics staffers from the Big Ten school soon followed. Theobald eventually installed Kevin Clark as Temple's athletic director and Pat Kraft became Clark's top deputy. On Monday, Theobald shuffled the deck, announcing that Kraft would replace Clark as AD, with Clark moving across Broad Street to the newly created position of executive vice president and chief operating officer, subject to the approval of Temple's board of trustees.
SPORTS
May 20, 2015 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he was hired by the Flyers and left the University of North Dakota on Monday, Dave Hakstol became just the third coach in NHL history to climb directly from the NCAA ranks to his first head coaching job in the NHL. He hopes to be as successful as one of them, the late Bob Johnson, who directed Pittsburgh to the Stanley Cup in 1991. Johnson coached the University of Wisconsin for 16 seasons and won three national titles before being hired by the Calgary Flames in 1982. The Flames made the playoffs in all five of his seasons and reached the Finals in 1986.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Brownstein Group and Vault Communications are in similar businesses: advertising and public relations, which means their success depends largely on people - who can set up shop anywhere. Brownstein is in Center City, while Vault is in Plymouth Meeting, and the tax consequences of their locations separate them far more than the 19 miles between their offices. Vault pays a business privilege tax of 0.15 percent and no local net income tax in Plymouth Township. Brownstein's tax bill in Philadelphia includes a 6.45 percent corporate income tax, a 0.1415 percent gross receipts tax, a 1.13 percent use and occupancy tax, and a 2 percent city sales tax. That heavier tax burden, coupled with the Philadelphia wage tax that is nearly four times higher than the average in the suburbs, has long handicapped the city's job growth.
SPORTS
May 17, 2015 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
MIKE BABCOCK promises this will all be over within a week. For the Flyers, the prospects of landing their No. 1 head-coaching candidate must seem at least a little dull, considering the optics of a 25-minute interview with TSN's Darren Dreger on Friday. Babcock thoughtfully answered every question, but the NHL's most sought after free-agent coach in history did so while sitting next to Detroit Red Wings general manager Ken Holland in a hotel room in Prague, where the two are scouting the World Championships.
NEWS
May 17, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin and Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writers
A locomotive with more than 8,000 horsepower, tugging cars carrying more than 200 people - and one man to keep it all on the tracks. On the night of Tuesday's fatal accident, that man was Brandon Bostian, a train enthusiast most of his life, an Amtrak employee for a decade, and an engineer since 2010. Bostian, 32, has remained publicly silent since the derailment of Train 188, but more details about him and his experience trickled out Friday. What also emerged was a fuller portrait of the largely solitary job that he and other engineers are entrusted to do. The training typically consists of at least six to 12 months of study and field work.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia city controller says the "greatest economic impact" in jobs and tax revenue for the 200-acre Southport section at the eastern end of the Navy Yard would be as a marine terminal for container cargo. Controller Alan Butkovitz said in a 15-page report released Wednesday that putting an energy port on part of the land also made "long-term economic sense," but should not impinge on the scale needed for a modern container ship terminal. Officials in recent years have suggested use of this undeveloped site for a marine terminal, energy port, or auto-processing facility.
BUSINESS
May 13, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia International Airport plans a 2015 job fair Tuesday at Temple University to fill more than 600 openings at the airport. More than 30 businesses, including airlines, restaurants, car-rental companies, retailers, and government agencies, will interview candidates for jobs that include customer-service representative, sales associate, bartender, server, bookkeeper, massage therapist, cosmetologist, manager, cashier, and others. The airport's fair will be from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Liacouras Center, 1776 N. Broad St. Applicants can meet with employment specialists to have their resumés reviewed and attend workplace-etiquette workshops for interview tips.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Employers' payrolls nationwide grew by 223,000 people in April, while the unemployment rate dropped slightly from 5.5 percent the previous month to 5.4 percent, the lowest rate since May 2008, the U.S. Labor Department said Friday. Employment improved in most sectors in April, including construction, manufacturing, government, financial, education, health services, hospitality, and retail. Employers are looking to hire, said Joanie Courtney, a senior vice president who heads online jobs board company Monster.com's market insight department.
SPORTS
May 9, 2015 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
Union defender Sheanon Williams has gone from franchise cornerstone to a player battling to remain in the starting lineup. Like many of his teammates, the 25-year-old Williams has gotten off to a rough start this year for the 1-6-3 Union, who visit the Vancouver Whitecaps (5-3-2) on Saturday. Williams is part of a defense that has surrendered 18 goals, the most in Major League Soccer. Union coach Jim Curtin has moved Williams to the left outside back spot, with Ray Gaddis switching over to the right.
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