FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 19, 2011 | By Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele
Washington is obsessed with the budget deficit. It's all that lawmakers can talk about. The hysteria is such that they can't even agree on raising the ceiling on the national debt. As for how much to cut out of the budget, some would settle on reduced spending in the billions. Others want much more. As one headline summed it up: "[House Speaker John] Boehner demands 'trillions' in spending cuts in exchange for lifting debt ceiling. " There's only one problem: Congress is wrought up over the wrong deficit.
NEWS
February 12, 2008
By Dominic Pileggi There is a lot of good happening in my hometown of Chester, the oldest city in Pennsylvania. But as Chester continues to recover from the dramatic loss of industrial and manufacturing jobs, and the loss of half its population - about 38,000 people - between 1950 and 2000, government must work with companies to plant the seeds of long-lasting revitalization in the city as it has with other older waterfront communities in Delaware County....
NEWS
April 7, 2006
PRESIDENT Bush must be going crazy trying to understand the American public. First George W. ships a lot of good jobs overseas during his administration, and the people complain that we are losing good jobs here. Then he tries to bring in and legitimize the illegal aliens already here in order to do jobs that are still here and have those jobs stay here. The people complain about that, too. What do Americans want? Mayer Krain Philadelphia
NEWS
February 4, 2010 | FATIMAH ALI
THE president finally understands that creating jobs trumps everything else on his plate, and I expect him to make some fast progress fixing the broken economy. There are far too many people underwater economically, with only a few gasps of air left. From the outset of his administration, it was obvious that getting the economy on track and putting Americans back to work should have topped President Obama's agenda. I'm still scratching my head over why he thought people without jobs would be more concerned about health insurance than working, when they're just trying to keep a roof over their heads and buy groceries.
NEWS
January 30, 2008
AGAIN, the anti-casino folks think they're winning the battle to delay the SugarHouse Casino. Residents who want this development have not only lived in Philadelphia all of their lives but many have lived in Fishtown all of their lives. We don't come from Boston or Ohio. We don't need another park or condo! We need something that will generate money and give us jobs! Donna Tomlinson, Board Member Fishtown Action
NEWS
January 13, 2012 | By Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
GREER, S.C. - Facing efforts by his Republican rivals to paint him as a heartless corporate raider who preyed on struggling companies while working in private equity, Republican front-runner Mitt Romney stepped up his defense of his tenure at Bain Capital on Thursday, arguing that his goal had been to make businesses successful over the long term. Supporters of former House Speaker Newt Gingrich have promised a "strong and sustained" campaign in the Palmetto State attacking Romney's career at Bain.
NEWS
June 14, 2006 | By Peter A. Gold
Besides providing higher education in its classrooms, Rutgers University is an active partner for economic growth in New Jersey and the region. One example of that is the Rutgers-Camden Technology Campus Inc., a mixed-use business incubator that is generating the jobs, new business and innovations needed to create a diverse economic base. Currently home to 50 businesses (35 on-site and 15 virtual tenants), the incubator has netted exceptional economic development results during the last three years.
NEWS
June 20, 2003
Tell us a story that sums up your most memorable summer job experience, whether good, bad or somewhere in between. What did you learn about yourself or the working life in general? Send essays of 200 to 300 words to Voices/Jobs, The Inquirer, 800 River Rd., Conshohocken, Pa. 19428. Send e-mail to pavoices@phillynews.com or faxes to 610-313-8243. Questions? Call Kevin Ferris, Pennsylvania Voices editor, at 610-313-8202.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2004 | By Thomas J. Brady INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Xlibris Corp., a Philadelphia book publisher, has laid off about 35 customer-service workers and moved the jobs to the Philippines. By relocating the work to a country where wages are lower, the company can triple the number of people doing similar work for the company, John Feldcamp, Xlibris chief executive officer, said yesterday. The jobs here paid about $24,000 a year. In the Philippines, he said, salaries for replacement workers are about one-fifth of that. "It was an act of necessity, not of greed," he said.
NEWS
May 17, 2002 | By PATRICK B. GILLESPIE
WHEN PEOPLE ASK me why I am supporting Ed Rendell for governor, I have a one-word answer: "Jobs. " Pennsylvania needs them. Ed Rendell knows how to help create them. There are 76,000 fewer Pennsylvanians working today than there were just one year ago. Pennsylvania workers need a governor who is committed to putting people to work at good, high-wage jobs. Ed Rendell not only has a plan to do that, but he is the only candidate for governor who has a record of actually putting people back to work.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 19, 2016
ISSUE | CLEAN ENERGY Jobs producer too It's difficult to understand a commentary's point that job creation and clean energy don't mix ("Once again, siding with greens over job creation," May 13). Advanced energy - which includes technologies such as wind, solar, and nuclear power; natural-gas generation; energy efficiency; advanced transportation; and advanced grid solutions - is a $200-billion-a-year industry in the United States and growing. The sector employs nearly 2.7 million people, and job growth outpaced overall U.S. employment growth 4-to-1 last year.
BUSINESS
May 17, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
The next time you grab a Bounty paper towel, Charmin or Scott bathroom tissue, Pampers or Luvs diaper, it just might have come from wood pulp shipped through the Tioga Marine Terminal in Port Richmond. Fibria Celulose, the world's largest producer of eucalyptus pulp, sends 360,000 tons of pulp a year from Brazil into Tioga on the Delaware River, an operation that supports the jobs of 160 stevedores and terminal workers. And now other wood-pulp companies are looking to come, too. The Philadelphia Regional Port Authority, a state agency that owns the terminal, says it will need to retrofit a second warehouse to accommodate the expected influx.
NEWS
May 14, 2016
By Dan Kish President Obama just had a change of heart on offshore energy development. Last year, the president put forward a blueprint to expand oil and gas exploration off the Atlantic Coast. This month, he shelved the plan. Environmentalists are celebrating. But it's a loss for the country. Obama has passed on an important opportunity to secure America's energy future and create thousands of jobs. The president has a long history of siding with environmentalists over working Americans.
NEWS
May 13, 2016
LOOKING BACK, what do you wish someone had told you before you sat in the human resources department at your first real-world job and faced that pile of paperwork? I was fortunate. Before I started working full-time as a reporter, my grandmother Big Mama passed along - well, more like drilled into me - three money lessons. They laid the groundwork for a lifetime of financial security. For college grads and other young folk entering the workforce, here's her priceless advice. *  Spread your money around . Big Mama told me to get four banking accounts at two different institutions.
SPORTS
May 13, 2016 | By Dick Jerardi, STAFF WRITER
WHEN HIS FRIENDS asked why he would take a Division II coaching job, Doug Overton has been answering simply: "Why not?" I was with Overton 25 years ago when he was student teaching at an elementary school near La Salle University. If he had not had a long NBA career, he probably would have become a schoolteacher. Starting now, he will be "teaching" basketball at Lincoln University in the rolling hills of southern Chester County. "It's great for me to be a part of a school as prestigious as Lincoln University," Overton said after he was introduced as the Lions coach Thursday morning at Lincoln's Market Street campus.
NEWS
May 12, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, Staff Writer
It was a pretty fast summer-job search for the son of the board chairman of the $12 billion Hershey Trust. And his dad took care of it. Robert Cavanaugh told the trust's top executive last April that his son Robert might have missed the window to get a summer internship and needed help. Within days, the executive, Eric Henry, contacted two money-management firms under contract with the charity and emailed the son's resumé. By the end of the month, both firms had made offers for summer internships.
NEWS
May 9, 2016 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
Mark Bryant, the longtime CEO of Camden's community health center, CAMcare, has been ousted from the organization. Though Bryant's name still appears on CAMcare's website as "President/CEO," Bryant confirmed Friday that he was suspended from his job last November and terminated in early March. Speaking from his home in Lawnside, the borough where he served as mayor for 20 years, Bryant declined to elaborate on the circumstances surrounding his departure. The president of CAMcare's board of trustees, Duane Myers, said he could not comment in any way on Bryant's current relationship to the federally funded organization.
SPORTS
May 5, 2016 | By Matt Breen, STAFF WRITER
ST. LOUIS - The Phillies bullpen entered the season as one of the team's glaring uncertainties. A month into the season, it has been an obvious reason for the team's surprising start. The unit - which entered Wednesday with 98 strikeouts in 87 innings - is finding success without having firepower. It is unconventional, but it is working. The Phillies relief pitchers, according to PitchF/X data, throw an average fastball of 91.7 mph. It is the fourth-slowest mark by a Phillies bullpen since the data began being tracked in 2007.
NEWS
May 5, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
For months, Tiesha Smith had dreamed of ringing the bell. Sometimes, a week would pass without the sound of it. Then, while sitting in one of her job- training classes at the workforce development agency Philadelphia Works, she would hear it peal. As in It's a Wonderful Life , the sound of the bell meant someone had received wings. It meant someone had landed a job. And now, they were ringing the brass bell in the lobby - "the sweet bell of success" - to celebrate, to let everyone know.
NEWS
May 2, 2016
John Brazer expected to get a good job when he left the University of Virginia, but he never expected he'd one day be the world's happiest 50-year-old guy in a tie. Brazer goes to a park every day. He hobnobs with celebrities. He vacations with a mascot. His business card actually says "Director of Fun and Games. " His job for the last 23 years has been to promote the Phillies brand . . . essentially however he sees fit. In 1993, Brazer was working for a consulting company but recently had returned from a stint in Manchester, England, where he coached and played lacrosse for a club team.
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