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Joe Bastardi

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NEWS
January 11, 1993 | by Edward Moran, Daily News Staff Writer
So, you were listening to the television and radio weather people again and they told you that it was going to snow Friday. "Significant" snow accumulations were possible, some said. Then you woke up Saturday morning and blades of grass were still visible on the lawn. Well, said Joe Bastardi, of AccuWeather, who calls himself an "expert, senior weather forecaster," the "Arnold Schwarzenegger" of forecasting, "No one ever said a big storm was coming. " "It was supposed to snow some Friday night into Saturday," Bastardi said.
NEWS
September 30, 2010 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
While drought advisories remain in effect for all of Pennsylvania and New Jersey, by tonight you may find that hard to believe. Flood watches have been posted for all of New Jersey, eastern Pennsylvania, and Delaware as nature is about to erase several weeks of serious dust-making with projected rain totals that read more like snow-accumulation forecasts. "This is a big flood threat," said Joe Bastardi, a meteorologist with AccuWeather Inc. He said some places in the region could see more than 5 inches of rain by the time it stops tonight.
NEWS
November 20, 2007 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The trees may be stuck in an October time warp, but the atmosphere evidently is proceeding on schedule to December. In much of the region, a two-day miserably cold rain enhanced the color of the astonishingly stubborn autumn leaves, but not far from Philadelphia, winter left an emphatic calling card. From 2 to 6 inches of snow was reported yesterday in the northern and western edges of the greater Philadelphia region, the result of a surprisingly strong disturbance in the upper atmosphere, said Jim Poirier, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Mount Holly.
NEWS
December 8, 2007 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 2008 hurricane season is likely to be less kind to the United States than the one that ended officially last week, according to forecasters at Colorado State University. For next season, which begins June 1 and ends Nov. 30, they foresee 13 named storms - those with winds of 39 m.p.h. or better - one fewer than this year. But the forecasters, Philip Klotzbach and William M. Gray, warn of a high likelihood that at least one major hurricane, with winds of 111 m.p.h. or more, will make U.S. landfall, which did not happen this year.
LIVING
August 28, 2000 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
During a glacially slow news week when the biggest story was a TV show, Debby looked like a godsend for the people who have to fill air time and column inches. It was a real, live hurricane heading straight for South Florida, perhaps getting there as soon as late Thursday. Tourists were yanked out of the Florida Keys as a precaution. Come late Thursday, however, Debby was done. It had lost everything, even its name. It was downgraded to a tropical depression, and then to a nonentity, an anonymous mass of thunderstorms floundering near Cuba.
NEWS
January 3, 1994 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Get out your sleds and your snowshovels. Just in case. Winter is about to show its stuff. We think. In the aftermath of a comparatively balmy 51-degree day yesterday, weather forecasters say a major winter storm will move into the area today, possibly bringing several inches of snow in the city, more to the north and west. It all depends on a large storm developing in the Gulf states that is going to be a slowpoke getting here and may alter the route it takes. "It looks like a sizeable storm to us," said Accu-Weather senior forecaster Joe Bastardi.
NEWS
August 31, 1993 | Daily News staff and wire reports
Will she hit or won't she? Will Hurricane Emily blow into the already weak New Jersey Shore, tear through the sand dunes and bring a raging ocean into the towns? Nobody knows yet. Weather forecasters are still unable to pinpoint where Emily will go after its expected noon landfall, but emergency officials at the shore started preparing for the worst. Shore towns battened down the hatches and emergency crews went on standby. Some beach patrols pulled swimmers from the ocean or flew caution flags as the surf reached 10-foot swells.
NEWS
February 11, 2010 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Where to put all this snow? When is the incredible winter of 2009-10 going to give it up? For the first question, there is no easy answer. And for the second? "I'd be shocked if there weren't one more or two more significant storms," said the usually cautious Ken Reeves, the manager of forecast operations at Accu-Weather Inc. in State College, Pa. Reeves said even the unimaginable - the 100-inch season - was at least a remote possibility given that the seasonal total stood at a record-plus 70 inches and the wintry pattern showed a disturbing tenacity.
NEWS
October 21, 2010 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The atmosphere is about to fast-forward into November, and some meteorologists see winter getting off to a fast start. But the early line is that the winter of 2010-11 should be a whole lot lighter on snow, heating budgets and history than its monstrous predecessor. In an updated outlook released this morning, Accuweather Inc. called for above-normal winter temperatures around here, with near-normal - albeit messy - snowfall. Commodities Weather Group, in Washington, issued a similar outlook last month and plans to freshen it next week.
NEWS
April 4, 2010 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joe Bastardi believes he is the only meteorologist in the land with a varsity wrestling letter, a trophy from his undergraduate years at Penn State. And now he may be in the wrestling match of his career, taking on a behemoth: the scientific consensus that the Earth is warming, perhaps catastrophically, and that human-produced carbon dioxide is to blame. Bastardi is one of the most visible forecasters at one of the nation's most visible forecasting companies, AccuWeather Inc., which is almost a Penn State annex.
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NEWS
October 22, 2010 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
After an unprecedented six-month run of warmth, the atmosphere has assumed a November-like chill, and some meteorologists foresee a brisk start to the cold and snow season. But the early consensus is that the winter of 2010-11 around here should be a whole lot lighter on snow, supermarket panic, and history than its monstrous predecessor. "If you want snow this year," said Mike Halpert, deputy director of the federal government's Climate Prediction Center, which released its winter outlook Thursday, "you're better off going out to the West.
NEWS
October 21, 2010 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The atmosphere is about to fast-forward into November, and some meteorologists see winter getting off to a fast start. But the early line is that the winter of 2010-11 should be a whole lot lighter on snow, heating budgets and history than its monstrous predecessor. In an updated outlook released this morning, Accuweather Inc. called for above-normal winter temperatures around here, with near-normal - albeit messy - snowfall. Commodities Weather Group, in Washington, issued a similar outlook last month and plans to freshen it next week.
NEWS
September 30, 2010 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
While drought advisories remain in effect for all of Pennsylvania and New Jersey, by tonight you may find that hard to believe. Flood watches have been posted for all of New Jersey, eastern Pennsylvania, and Delaware as nature is about to erase several weeks of serious dust-making with projected rain totals that read more like snow-accumulation forecasts. "This is a big flood threat," said Joe Bastardi, a meteorologist with AccuWeather Inc. He said some places in the region could see more than 5 inches of rain by the time it stops tonight.
NEWS
April 4, 2010 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joe Bastardi believes he is the only meteorologist in the land with a varsity wrestling letter, a trophy from his undergraduate years at Penn State. And now he may be in the wrestling match of his career, taking on a behemoth: the scientific consensus that the Earth is warming, perhaps catastrophically, and that human-produced carbon dioxide is to blame. Bastardi is one of the most visible forecasters at one of the nation's most visible forecasting companies, AccuWeather Inc., which is almost a Penn State annex.
NEWS
February 11, 2010 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Where to put all this snow? When is the incredible winter of 2009-10 going to give it up? For the first question, there is no easy answer. And for the second? "I'd be shocked if there weren't one more or two more significant storms," said the usually cautious Ken Reeves, the manager of forecast operations at Accu-Weather Inc. in State College, Pa. Reeves said even the unimaginable - the 100-inch season - was at least a remote possibility given that the seasonal total stood at a record-plus 70 inches and the wintry pattern showed a disturbing tenacity.
NEWS
October 15, 2009 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Winter-storm watches have been posted as nearby as Pottsville. A cold and nasty nor'easter is poised to punish the Philadelphia region for the next two days, followed by another during the weekend. The solstice is still better than two months away - and, for that matter, most folks probably haven't yet made any hard decisions about Halloween costumes. But some weather experts are saying that what the region will get in the next few days is a foretaste of the winter to come.
NEWS
December 8, 2007 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 2008 hurricane season is likely to be less kind to the United States than the one that ended officially last week, according to forecasters at Colorado State University. For next season, which begins June 1 and ends Nov. 30, they foresee 13 named storms - those with winds of 39 m.p.h. or better - one fewer than this year. But the forecasters, Philip Klotzbach and William M. Gray, warn of a high likelihood that at least one major hurricane, with winds of 111 m.p.h. or more, will make U.S. landfall, which did not happen this year.
NEWS
November 20, 2007 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The trees may be stuck in an October time warp, but the atmosphere evidently is proceeding on schedule to December. In much of the region, a two-day miserably cold rain enhanced the color of the astonishingly stubborn autumn leaves, but not far from Philadelphia, winter left an emphatic calling card. From 2 to 6 inches of snow was reported yesterday in the northern and western edges of the greater Philadelphia region, the result of a surprisingly strong disturbance in the upper atmosphere, said Jim Poirier, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Mount Holly.
NEWS
May 28, 2006 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Call it the storm before the storm. Up and down the coastline, as the 2006 hurricane season approaches, emergency workers, local officials and Shore residents say they are making unprecedented preparations for catastrophic storms, driven by the devastation that Hurricane Katrina inflicted on the Gulf Coast last year. "The Jersey Shore is definitely overdue for a direct hit," National Weather Service meteorologist Jim Eberwine said. "And if a direct hit comes, it's clear that damage would be substantial and catastrophic.
NEWS
December 5, 2003 | By Anthony R. Wood and Jere Downs INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
While the solstice is still more than two weeks away, one sure sign of winter already has emphatically arrived: Computer models have been squabbling all week over the fate of a coastal storm that is supposed to hit hardest tonight. The region's first measurable snow of the season was all but a certainty, and tomorrow is not looking like a good day to string up those outdoor lights. But meteorologists and the computers they rely on to forecast the weather were far less certain about how much snow ultimately would be measured.
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