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Joe Bryant

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SPORTS
June 10, 2000 | By Mike Jensen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joe Bryant saw a lot of recognizable faces among the players trying out for scouts at the Moody Bible Institute during this week's NBA pre-draft camp. "The strange thing is, this is Kobe's class," Bryant said yesterday. "I watched these guys all through the years, starting in ninth grade. " Bryant was at the camp on business. In December, his son bought a 50 percent stake in Olimpia Milano, an Italian professional club. So while Kobe Bryant is playing in his first NBA Finals, his father, who is running the club, is hunting for players.
SPORTS
April 18, 2006 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Former La Salle standout Joe Bryant, the father of Los Angeles Lakers star Kobe Bryant, was named yesterday as coach of the WNBA's Los Angeles Sparks. Bryant, a former 76er, served as an assistant to Sparks coach Henry Bibby last season, then filled in as the coach for the final five games of the regular season and the playoffs. Bibby is now on Maurice Cheeks' staff with the 76ers. Bryant's former La Salle coach, Paul Westhead, now coaches the WNBA's Phoenix Mercury. Lauren Jackson signed a multiyear deal to remain with the WNBA's Seattle Storm.
SPORTS
June 23, 1995 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
What is it like to grow up in Philadelphia and then play pro basketball here? Joe Bryant, for one, can provide an answer. Since moving from Syracuse to Philadelphia for the 1963-64 season and switching nicknames from the Nationals to the 76ers, the franchise has employed 13 products of city high schools. Cliff Anderson (Edison), Mike Bantom (Roman), Jerry Baskerville (Edison), Larry Cannon (Lincoln), Lewis Lloyd (Overbrook) and Hubie White (West Philadelphia) played here for not more than one season.
SPORTS
May 8, 1996 | by Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
News flash: Joe Bryant is no longer an assistant at his alma mater, La Salle University. He resigned yesterday, after three seasons on Speedy Morris's staff. That should come as no great surprise to anyone who's followed the situation at 20th and Olney for the past month or so. Bryant apparently didn't show up for work much lately, as his son Kobe, the national high school player of the year, was finalizing his decision to forgo college and enter the NBA draft. Bryant could not be reached last night for comment.
SPORTS
April 30, 1996 | By Chris Morkides, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The relationship between Joe and Kobe Bryant is perfect, if the news conference held yesterday to proclaim Kobe's decision to skip college and go directly to the pros is any indication. The relationship between La Salle University's head basketball coach, Speedy Morris, and his assistant, Joe Bryant, needs some mending, if it is not irreparably broken already. Kobe Bryant announced his intention to a throng of media, players and students in the Lower Merion High School gym, where he had scored so many of his Southeastern Pennsylvania-record 2,883 points.
NEWS
May 9, 2003
SLICE IT any way you want, but Joe Bryant is a racist - plain and simple (sports, May 1). Write it, learn it, know it, accept it. If the Bryants were white, and the father didn't speak to his son because the son's wife was black, Joe Bryant would be crucified in every media outlet imaginable. Kobe's wife is a white Hispanic, which contributes to the "Jellybean's" uneasiness. If Kobe's wife looked more like Celia Cruz, I doubt that Joe B. would have as many problems with Kobe.
SPORTS
October 5, 1995 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
The best high school basketball player in America plays in a Philadelphia suburb. This summer, he was so dazzling in venues around the country, from camp to tournament to camp, he zoomed right to the top of the recruiting gurus' charts. Kobe Bryant, the 6-7, do-it-all senior from Lower Merion High, could play in the city next year. Or he could play in just about any big city in America and two in Canada. According to his father, Joe Bryant, the La Salle assistant coach and former La Salle and 76ers player, Kobe is accepting no home visits from college coaches and visiting no college campuses.
SPORTS
April 1, 1996 | By Chris Morkides, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Joe Bryant, the father, knew exactly what Kobe Bryant, the son, was experiencing in the McDonald's All-American basketball game yesterday. The former 76er had played in a few such games himself, including the old Dapper Dan Classic - which pitted Pennsylvania all-stars against U.S. stars - during his senior year at Bartram in 1972. That game also was played at the Civic Arena. That game also was more of a showcase for top seniors than an athletic contest. Joe Bryant won the Dapper Dan MVP award in '72. Lower Merion's Kobe Bryant played well in the East's 120-105 victory over the West yesterday, although MVP honors went to Shaheen Holloway, a guard from St. Patrick's of Elizabeth, N.J. The father felt pride and something else.
SPORTS
May 6, 1996 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
Just because the Minnesota Timberwolves selected a high school player in last year's NBA draft doesn't mean they would do it again. In fact, Lower Merion High's Kobe Bryant can almost surely count out being selected by the lottery-locked Wolves. "There will be a kid who can do it once every decade," said Kevin McHale, the Wolves' vice president of basketball operations, who last year selected 6-11 small forward Kevin Garnett from Chicago's Farragut Academy at No. 5. "In another 10 years, it will happen again.
SPORTS
April 26, 2013 | BY BOB VETRONE JR., Daily News Staff Writer boopstats@phillynews.com
AS A COLLEGE basketball fan in the early 1970s, maybe you went to the Palestra to see Joe Bryant or Mike Bantom or Ron Haigler. But a friend and I would go there for another reason - to watch Temple's Joe Rymal. Joe wasn't the Owls' leading scorer or top rebounder. No he was something more important than that, he was the older brother of my friend and classmate Tom Rymal. And having a relative playing in the Palestra at that time was the Hoops Holy Grail. Tom, who played at North Catholic, Community College and Drexel, was the best basketball player I ever appeared on a court with regularly.
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NEWS
June 12, 2013 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
THE LAST PLACE Kobe Bryant wants to be right now, besides watching the NBA Finals from home, is New Jersey. Lawyers representing the Los Angeles Lakers superstar said a settlement's been reached in a dispute with his mother, Pamela Bryant, and a South Jersey auction house over a hundred pieces of memorabilia he'd left behind. The results of the settlement are confidential, but Pamela Bryant, who received an advance of $450,000 from Goldin Auctions of West Berlin, Camden County, for her son's memorabilia, issued an official apology over the ordeal along with Kobe's father, Joe. "We regret our actions and statements related to the Kobe Bryant auction memorabilia.
SPORTS
April 26, 2013 | BY BOB VETRONE JR., Daily News Staff Writer boopstats@phillynews.com
AS A COLLEGE basketball fan in the early 1970s, maybe you went to the Palestra to see Joe Bryant or Mike Bantom or Ron Haigler. But a friend and I would go there for another reason - to watch Temple's Joe Rymal. Joe wasn't the Owls' leading scorer or top rebounder. No he was something more important than that, he was the older brother of my friend and classmate Tom Rymal. And having a relative playing in the Palestra at that time was the Hoops Holy Grail. Tom, who played at North Catholic, Community College and Drexel, was the best basketball player I ever appeared on a court with regularly.
SPORTS
April 12, 2013 | By Peter Mucha, Philly.com
Kobe Bryant wouldn't have put up with "abuse" from a coach like Rutgers' Mike Rice. "I would have smacked the hell out of him," the Los Angeles Lakers star told Showtime's Jim Rome. "I mean, no question about it. ... It probably wouldn't have been the best way to react to it, but that's how I would have reacted. " Even at age 18? "Oh, no question. I mean, just a year later I was going at with Shaq," he said, referring to the much bigger Shaquille O'Neill, then the Lakers center.
SPORTS
January 3, 2013 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
LOS ANGELES - When the locker room opened for the media Tuesday before the 76ers-Lakers game, Sixers players were involved in an animated discussion. The topic was the All-Star Game and their conversation centered mostly on Jrue Holiday and whether he will be on the Eastern Conference team for the game on Feb. 17 in Houston. The banter started with players speculating who would start for the East. Then, as they reached somewhat of a consensus, they turned to the subs. Holiday, they all said, deserves to be there before some of the more prominent guards in the East, such as Deron Williams, Kyrie Irving and the like.
SPORTS
July 12, 2011
ELTON BRAND won't accept failure. Even if it has the propensity to lighten his already deep pockets. That's probably why the Sixers forward is trying his luck in the movie industry again, this time signing on as a co-producer for the upcoming film "Tupac," a biopic on the life and death of the West Coast hip-hop artist. This isn't Brand's first venture into the movie game. While in Los Angeles as a Clipper, Brand co-founded a small production company called Gibraltar Entertainment.
SPORTS
April 18, 2006 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Former La Salle standout Joe Bryant, the father of Los Angeles Lakers star Kobe Bryant, was named yesterday as coach of the WNBA's Los Angeles Sparks. Bryant, a former 76er, served as an assistant to Sparks coach Henry Bibby last season, then filled in as the coach for the final five games of the regular season and the playoffs. Bibby is now on Maurice Cheeks' staff with the 76ers. Bryant's former La Salle coach, Paul Westhead, now coaches the WNBA's Phoenix Mercury. Lauren Jackson signed a multiyear deal to remain with the WNBA's Seattle Storm.
SPORTS
August 18, 2005 | By Mel Greenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Former La Salle star, father of an NBA superstar, and now a head coach in the WNBA. That would be Joe "Jelly Bean" Bryant, the father of the Los Angeles Lakers' Kobe Bryant, who yesterday was named to run the Los Angeles Sparks through at least the end of the season. Bryant, 50, replaces another former 76er, Henry Bibby, who was dismissed Tuesday. Sparks president Johnny Buss did not announce the change until yesterday. The former La Salle star played for eight years in the NBA, his last season coming in 1982-83 with the Houston Rockets.
NEWS
May 9, 2003
SLICE IT any way you want, but Joe Bryant is a racist - plain and simple (sports, May 1). Write it, learn it, know it, accept it. If the Bryants were white, and the father didn't speak to his son because the son's wife was black, Joe Bryant would be crucified in every media outlet imaginable. Kobe's wife is a white Hispanic, which contributes to the "Jellybean's" uneasiness. If Kobe's wife looked more like Celia Cruz, I doubt that Joe B. would have as many problems with Kobe.
SPORTS
June 10, 2000 | By Mike Jensen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joe Bryant saw a lot of recognizable faces among the players trying out for scouts at the Moody Bible Institute during this week's NBA pre-draft camp. "The strange thing is, this is Kobe's class," Bryant said yesterday. "I watched these guys all through the years, starting in ninth grade. " Bryant was at the camp on business. In December, his son bought a 50 percent stake in Olimpia Milano, an Italian professional club. So while Kobe Bryant is playing in his first NBA Finals, his father, who is running the club, is hunting for players.
SPORTS
June 4, 1996 | By Stephen A. Smith, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kobe Bryant, the child prodigy from Lower Merion High School who declared himself eligible for the draft on April 29, has elected not to participate in this week's NBA pre-draft camp. "It was my father's decision," said Bryant, 17, dressed in a silver and black warm-up suit, looking as if he was ready to play ball. "He said it would be a wise decision right now. He said I'm up there at a pretty nice pick right now, so why risk it? I can understand that. "But you know me. My competitive juices are flowing right now. I see all these guys here, I'm ready to go out and play right now. But it's his decision, and I respect that.
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