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Joe Coleman

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NEWS
November 7, 1987 | By Robin Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
City Councilwoman Joan L. Krajewski yesterday announced a bid to unseat Joseph E. Coleman as Council president and lashed out at Council Republicans, who this week virtually ensured Coleman's retention by throwing him their support. "We cannot allow this city to continue the way it has under the leadership of Joe Coleman," Krajewski said. "Where are Councilman Longstreth's principles?" Krajewski was responding to the announcement Thursday that W. Thacher Longstreth and Council's two other Republicans - who have often criticized Coleman's leadership - were supporting his bid to retain the presidency.
NEWS
January 9, 1987
There we were, placidly thinking that all we had done was be critical of a few of City Council's more ludicrous positions. Then Joe Coleman explained it. What the Council president explained was that the press, particularly the Daily News, was trying to take away City Council's duties under the City Charter. What's more, he said, we were attempting to damage that distinguished deliberative body by attacking him. Wow. At no point, of course, did Coleman address the substance of the criticism that has been leveled at him and Council.
NEWS
January 5, 2001 | By Elmer Smith
You couldn't just walk in unannounced on Joe Coleman; there was a protocol that had to be observed. So, I had submitted my question in advance, just two words: "What's next. " This was 1992. Coleman was ending a 12-year tenure as City Council president. At 70, he was old enough to retire and accomplished enough to have earned it. But Coleman had reinvented himself repeatedly in a professional life that spanned 50 years and three different careers. I was certain he would retire to something.
NEWS
February 19, 1991 | BY ELMER SMITH
City Council members were casting lots for his presidential garments. Back in his home district, shade trees were festooned with the campaign posters of his rivals. Joe Coleman surveyed this sea of troubles and wondered whether twas nobler to take arms or take to an armchair. By now, you know his answer. But as late as one week ago, the man who likes to be called "Mr. President" was still contemplating his future - and pondering his past. "My secretary put these together recently," Coleman told me last week as we sat in his office leafing through a bound volume of his published papers.
NEWS
February 18, 1988
Veteran members of City Council often complain about their negative portrayal in the press. But a major reason Council doesn't have and won't get respect from anyone with more brain matter and integrity than already-chewed tobacco could be expressed in a two-word commentary: "Joe Coleman. " It was President Coleman who stood on the floor of City Council on Jan. 8, 1987, and read aloud a Daily News editorial about rip-off pension legislation Council had passed. Coleman raged for 18 minutes about the sanctity of the pension plan, and how obvious it was that current Council members would have to pay for any additional benefits they might receive under the new plan.
NEWS
March 10, 1988
Joe Coleman has spoken. No surprises. Same old stuff. Joe, you might recall, told everybody a while back that changes in city pensions would not mean windfalls for city officials, that any reports to the contrary were from newspapers spreading "disinformation. " Then when the law went into effect, a 40 percent retroactive boost kicked in for Coleman, his City Council colleagues and five other elected city officials. That's when our Council president shut up. He had no comment on pensions, which is just as well because only an idiot would have believed him at that point.
NEWS
September 18, 1997 | by Mister Mann Frisby, Daily News Staff Writer
The grandchildren of former City Council President Joe Coleman watched in horror as their mother was gunned down. As Stephanie Coleman, 41, lay dying in a pool of blood Tuesday night, her children, Phillip, 9, and Desiree, 7, ran into the parking lot of their apartment complex screaming for help. Police said Coleman's boyfriend, Steve Hutchinson, 31, argued with her outside Canaan Baptist Church, on Pulaski Avenue near Coulter Street, prior to the shooting. Hutchinson, driving a black Lexus, then followed Coleman and her children to their apartment complex on Old York Road near 69th Avenue in East Oak Lane, police said.
NEWS
September 24, 1997 | By Maida Odom, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joe Coleman reached over gently again and again to pat his wife's hands as she talked for them both. It was very difficult for him to speak yesterday - one week to the day after the murder of his daughter, Stephanie Coleman-Epps; one week to the day after the last time he saw her alive. They had been talking about her future that afternoon - her plans to study for an MBA, his pledge to provide financial and emotional support. But Coleman-Epps' future was "cut off so abruptly, so violently," whispered the former president of City Council as he and his wife, Jessie, sat in their Mount Airy living room talking quietly about the tragedy and their gratitude for the outpouring of support they received.
NEWS
January 18, 1986 | By JUAN GONZALEZ, Daily News Staff Writer
City Solicitor Handsel B. Minyard ruled yesterday that the state constitution forbids former City Councilman Harry P. Jannotti from assuming the post of director of the city's Veterans Advisory Council because of his conviction for bribery in the Abscam scandal. After receiving Minyard's decision late yesterday, Council President Joseph E. Coleman, who appointed Jannotti to the $30,865-a-year post early this week, announced he was withdrawing the appointment "in spite of his (Jannotti's)
NEWS
October 26, 1987 | By HOWARD SCHNEIDER, Daily News Staff Writer
It was clearly not Joe Coleman's crowd. First Republican mayoral nominee Frank L. Rizzo zinged the City Council president. "We (Republicans) are going to clean (City Council) out," Rizzo told a Chestnut Hill Community Association forum. The promise drew hearty applause from the audience of bow-tied men and conservatively dressed women. Then Council challenger DeLores Weaver, a Community College of Philadelphia administrator, jabbed at Coleman throughout their hourlong joint appearance yesterday.
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NEWS
January 5, 2001 | By Elmer Smith
You couldn't just walk in unannounced on Joe Coleman; there was a protocol that had to be observed. So, I had submitted my question in advance, just two words: "What's next. " This was 1992. Coleman was ending a 12-year tenure as City Council president. At 70, he was old enough to retire and accomplished enough to have earned it. But Coleman had reinvented himself repeatedly in a professional life that spanned 50 years and three different careers. I was certain he would retire to something.
NEWS
April 20, 1998 | By Lubna Khan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Great Valley school board is expected to vote tonight on whether to house a new support program for county teens coming out of short-term hospital treatment for emotional or drug and alcohol problems. The Chester County Intermediate Unit requested that Great Valley house the "Transitional Support Program" because it has the only high school in the area with the room to do so. The program would be six to nine weeks long, with youths receiving counseling and eventually attending Great Valley classes.
NEWS
September 24, 1997 | By Maida Odom, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joe Coleman reached over gently again and again to pat his wife's hands as she talked for them both. It was very difficult for him to speak yesterday - one week to the day after the murder of his daughter, Stephanie Coleman-Epps; one week to the day after the last time he saw her alive. They had been talking about her future that afternoon - her plans to study for an MBA, his pledge to provide financial and emotional support. But Coleman-Epps' future was "cut off so abruptly, so violently," whispered the former president of City Council as he and his wife, Jessie, sat in their Mount Airy living room talking quietly about the tragedy and their gratitude for the outpouring of support they received.
NEWS
September 18, 1997 | by Mister Mann Frisby, Daily News Staff Writer
The grandchildren of former City Council President Joe Coleman watched in horror as their mother was gunned down. As Stephanie Coleman, 41, lay dying in a pool of blood Tuesday night, her children, Phillip, 9, and Desiree, 7, ran into the parking lot of their apartment complex screaming for help. Police said Coleman's boyfriend, Steve Hutchinson, 31, argued with her outside Canaan Baptist Church, on Pulaski Avenue near Coulter Street, prior to the shooting. Hutchinson, driving a black Lexus, then followed Coleman and her children to their apartment complex on Old York Road near 69th Avenue in East Oak Lane, police said.
NEWS
July 4, 1996 | By Jennifer Inez Ward, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Come this fall, before the start of school, borough children will find new play equipment at the playground behind Noah's Ark, a day-care center on Main Street. Joe Coleman, head of the Hulmeville Playground Committee, said the organization had raised $45,000 of its $50,000 goal for new equipment. A large portion of the money came from a recently awarded $20,000 state Keystone Community Grant, which comes from the state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. Coleman said the committee members kept their fingers crossed for the grant.
SPORTS
July 29, 1993 | By Sam Carchidi, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If the St. Louis Cardinals are going to overtake the Phillies, the numbers suggest, they are going to have to make changes in their starting rotation quickly. Before last night's game with the Phillies, St. Louis was 6-6 since the all-star break, but the collective ERA of Cardinals starters in those 12 games was 6.05. And the bullpen had been even worse. "It's the most frustrating period since I've been here," Joe Coleman, in his third year as St. Louis' pitching coach, said before the Phils beat the Cards, 14-6, last night.
NEWS
January 23, 1992 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
In the Joe Coleman School of Art, the motto is: "If at first you don't succeed, rip it up and start over. " Artist Monte Frazier learned that lesson the hard way yesterday when he found out that retired Council President Coleman had destroyed Frazier's life- size portrait of him because it wasn't up to presidential snuff. But Coleman figures the taxpayers got a Rembrandt for a Warhol. Frazier was paid $3,300 in tax dollars for the destroyed painting. But Coleman spent $4,000 of his own money to sit for a second painting by Rebecca Rose of the Rose Metzger Fine Art Co. With no fanfare, the second painting was installed in Council's caucus room in early January, joining four other portraits of past Council presidents.
NEWS
February 19, 1991 | BY ELMER SMITH
City Council members were casting lots for his presidential garments. Back in his home district, shade trees were festooned with the campaign posters of his rivals. Joe Coleman surveyed this sea of troubles and wondered whether twas nobler to take arms or take to an armchair. By now, you know his answer. But as late as one week ago, the man who likes to be called "Mr. President" was still contemplating his future - and pondering his past. "My secretary put these together recently," Coleman told me last week as we sat in his office leafing through a bound volume of his published papers.
NEWS
February 15, 1991 | By Thomas Turcol, Inquirer Staff Writer
City Council President Joseph E. Coleman, a quiet lawmaker who strove to maintain peace among his unruly colleagues, has decided to end his 20-year stay in City Hall and not seek election to a sixth term. After personally informing some of his closest allies, Coleman declared his intentions in letters that were to be delivered over the weekend to City Council members, party ward leaders and members of his City Hall staff. "The city needs a change," said Coleman, who was first elected in 1971 and became Council president in 1980 after the FBI's Abscam undercover investigation ended the political careers of Coleman's predecessor, George X. Schwartz, and former majority leader Harry P. Jannotti.
NEWS
December 5, 1990 | By Thomas Turcol, Inquirer Staff Writer
City Council President Joseph E. Coleman, whose easygoing style has both charmed and frustrated the other 16 Council members, is being challenged to assert his authority and "call the shots" before Councilman John F. Street seizes too much power. In an unusually direct criticism of Council's top official, Councilwoman Marian B. Tasco said that Coleman has become too passive, relinquishing his authority to Street in key areas and creating a leadership vacuum that has allowed Street to "manipulate the system to his advantage.
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