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Joe Dimaggio

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NEWS
November 4, 2000 | By Robert Huber
The verdict is now in on baseball great Joe DiMaggio. As Richard Ben Cramer's mammoth new biography, Joe DiMaggio, The Hero's Life, makes abundantly clear, the character of the Yankee Clipper was about as far as you can get from grace and dignity and all the other nice words pasted to him. DiMaggio was paranoid, jealous, neurotically self-involved, money-obsessed, and a misogynist, for starters. He cavorted with mobsters and whores, beat up Marilyn Monroe, abandoned his first wife, ignored his son, sold all but one of his World Series rings and then claimed they were stolen, said that arch-rival Ted Williams ran like a duck and threw like a girl, demanded to be the one and only Greatest Living Player as long as he still breathed.
SPORTS
March 11, 1999 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Joe DiMaggio's estranged son will be a pallbearer at his father's private funeral in San Francisco. Only about 30 relatives and close friends will attend the service today at SS. Peter and Paul Church, where DiMaggio married his first wife, Dorothy Arnold in 1939. "Joe insisted that his funeral be a private, religious service, and his family is intent on carrying out his wishes," said Morris Engelberg, DiMaggio's friend and attorney. There was some dispute about whether New York Yankees owner George Steinbrenner had been invited.
SPORTS
October 22, 1992 | by Ted Taylor, Special to the Daily News
If you've been waiting for Joe DiMaggio to show up at a baseball card show near you so that you can get his autograph in person, wait no longer. It isn't going to happen. At least, it isn't going to happen until after Jan. 1, 1994. DiMaggio, 77, has an exclusive deal with a Cherry Hill company, Score Board, that will preclude his appearances at shows for the next year-and-a- half and make his signature on balls and photos available through Score Board, which sells its goods through cable shopping networks and the hobby press.
NEWS
March 9, 1999 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joe DiMaggio, the elegant, enigmatic New York Yankees legend whose 56-game hitting streak endures as one of baseball's greatest feats, and whose mellifluous name came to symbolize a lost American innocence, died yesterday at age 84. Mr. DiMaggio had been in poor health since Oct. 12, when he entered Memorial Regional Hospital in Hollywood, Fla., for surgery to remove a tumor from his lung. Reportedly near death at several junctures during his 99-day hospital stay, he recovered and returned to his Hollywood, Fla., home.
NEWS
January 27, 1999 | By Claude Lewis
Mike Tyson and Joe DiMaggio have been on my mind of late, but for different reasons. It is with reluctance that I mention Tyson's name in a column with DiMaggio. The two men are a study in opposites. I am aware that putting their names in a single sentence is to link crass with class. Tyson, who has had nearly as many fights outside the ring as he's had inside, continues to bully his way through life. Wealth and athleticism have not changed him a bit. Once the youngest ever to capture the heavyweight boxing championship of the world, he remains the hoodlum he was in his harrowing childhood in Brooklyn's slums.
NEWS
July 27, 1993 | By Terence Samuel, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Yankee Stadium sits on 11 1/2 acres of hallowed ground on the western edge of the Bronx overlooking the Harlem River. It opened in 1923, the year the New York Yankees won the first of the team's 22 world championships. It is a place that has been consecrated by baseball's giants. Babe Ruth. Joe DiMaggio. Mickey Mantle. Swashbuckling and invincible, the Yankees seemed to embody the national spirit. In the 1920s, before the Empire State Building was finished, people came to New York to see the Statue of Liberty, and Yankee Stadium.
SPORTS
March 9, 1999 | By Jim Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Until Joe Carter came along and introduced his Louisville Slugger to Mitch Williams' tired fastball on the night of Oct. 23, 1993, the most crushing home run hit against the Phillies in World Series play was Joe DiMaggio's game-winner in Game 2 of the 1950 World Series. DiMaggio, who died yesterday at age 84, was 35 and in the penultimate season of his magnificent career when he led off the 10th inning of a 1-1 game by belting a 2-1 fastball from Robin Roberts into the upper deck above left field at Philadelphia's Shibe Park.
SPORTS
March 9, 1999 | by Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writer
He stood in the shadows on a warm summer evening, a solitary figure in a crisp suit and tie, smoking a cigarette in the dingy, narrow cement corridor that runs behind the team boxes and press booths of Veterans Stadium. Just down the hallway, city Councilman Thacher Longstreth helped his wife, Nancy, to their seats for another evening at the ballpark. But something about the man with the cigarette prompted Longstreth to go back into the hallway. As he drew closer, he could make out the noble nose.
NEWS
July 10, 2014
An op-ed on Tuesday misstated the number of times the Yankees won the World Series while Joe DiMaggio played for them. It was nine.
NEWS
November 25, 2012
a. Andrew Carnegie, 1835. b. Carry Nation, 1846. c. John XXIII, 1881. d. Joe DiMaggio, 1914. e. Ricardo Montalban, 1920. f. Percy Sledge, 1940 (some sources say 1941). g. Ben Stein, 1944. h. John Larroquette, 1947. i. John F. Kennedy Jr., 1960. j. Christina Applegate, 1971.
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SPORTS
December 19, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
BEFORE THE SWOOSH came into his life, Michael Jordan wore Converse. Yesterday a powder-blue pair of leather hightops that he wore at North Carolina sold at auction for $33,387. ESPN.com reported that the sneaks - inscribed "Best Wishes, Michael Jordan" - were consigned to Grey Flannel Auctions by a high school teammate of Jordan's. The winning bidder, who chose to remain anonymous, purchased a nice piece of history. But they are far less valuable that some other Jordan memorabilia.
SPORTS
November 15, 2014 | BY JOHN McGONIGAL, Daily News Staff Writer mcgonij@phillynews.com
STATE COLLEGE - Joe Paterno was still in high school, Joe DiMaggio hit safely in 56 consecutive games and World War II raged on in Europe. The year was 1941, and to many, that time in history holds special meaning. For old-timer Yankees fans, it's DiMaggio's streak. For film junkies, Orson Welles' "Citizen Kane" premiered. But for longtime Penn State and Temple fans, they know 1941 for something else: the last time the Nittany Lions lost to the Owls. Anyone with fingers and toes or a calculator can tell you that Temple has gone 72 seasons without defeating Penn State.
NEWS
July 10, 2014
An op-ed on Tuesday misstated the number of times the Yankees won the World Series while Joe DiMaggio played for them. It was nine.
SPORTS
October 11, 2013 | By Stan Hochman, Daily News Columnist
NEW YORK - Babe Ruth never spoke to Lou Gehrig, because Gehrig's mom once criticized the way Claire, Ruth's second wife, dressed Dorothy, Ruth's adopted daughter. Mickey Mantle hated Joe DiMaggio, because Joe D called him off a fly ball he was tracking and Mantle veered away and stepped in a drainage hole and wrecked his knee. Thurmon Munson detested Reggie Jackson, because Reggie said he was "the straw that stirred the drink" and because Jackson made more money than he did, which broke a promise they'd made to Munson.
NEWS
November 25, 2012
a. Andrew Carnegie, 1835. b. Carry Nation, 1846. c. John XXIII, 1881. d. Joe DiMaggio, 1914. e. Ricardo Montalban, 1920. f. Percy Sledge, 1940 (some sources say 1941). g. Ben Stein, 1944. h. John Larroquette, 1947. i. John F. Kennedy Jr., 1960. j. Christina Applegate, 1971.
SPORTS
October 5, 2012 | Associated Press
SEATTLE - Angels rookie Mike Trout went 2 for 3 at the plate with a double leading off the sixth and a single in the eighth in Los Angeles' 12-0 loss to Seattle on Wednesday, finishing with a .326 average. That was good for second in the AL batting race but pretty much locked up the triple crown for Detroit's Miguel Cabrera. It was a rough night for Trout, who fell short of his 50th steal and was twice thrown out on the base paths. Trout, a Millville High product, was plunked in the back by Seattle starter Blake Beavan leading off the game and then was thrown out by Jesus Montero trying to steal.
SPORTS
September 3, 2011 | By Don McKee, Inquirer Columnist
Breaking news: The Yankees and Red Sox have wrapped up their three-game series. That's right - for the first time in modern memory, Boston and New York are not playing each other. OK, we exaggerate. But not by much. The three-game series took 11 hours, 36 minutes to complete, with the Bombers taking the series, two games to one, with a 4-2 win at Fenway that took 4 hours, 21 minutes on Thursday. (Comparison: On Monday, the Yanks put away the Orioles, 3-2, in a tidy 2:32.) The first two games of the series went 3:59 and 3:16, respectively.
SPORTS
July 18, 2011
Sunday was the 70th anniversary of the end of Joe DiMaggio's storied 56-game hitting streak, which captivated the nation in 1941. The feat is worthy of all the attention, and DiMaggio is certainly due all the respect given him the last seven decades. But there are actually two other streaks from that same era that might be more impressive than DiMag's 56-gamer. One was by the Yankee Clipper himself, who drew a walk in the game immediately preceding the 56-game hitting streak.
SPORTS
May 13, 2011 | By MARK KRAM, kramm@phillynews.com
IT IS THE single-season record that stands above all others, what Phillies shortstop Jimmy Rollins referred to as the "Golden Grail. " No one has come close to breaking it, and yet each year before he has headed off to spring training, Rollins has told his brother, Antwon: "This is the season I'm going to break Joe DiMaggio's hitting streak. " Given the enormity of that goal, Rollins could just as easily have said he planned to swim across the Atlantic Ocean. That is how unlikely it is that anyone in major league baseball will ever again get a hit in 56 consecutive games.
SPORTS
June 7, 2010 | By Bob Kelley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Man of a thousand runs Meet Ichiro Suzuki, millennium man. Over the weekend, the Seattle rightfielder crossed the plate for his 1,000 time, becoming the eighth-fastest active player - and third Mariner ever - to reach the mark. Then for good measure, he made it 1,001 in Sunday's 9-4 home loss to the Angels. The day before, in the fifth, also against the Angels, he doubled for his second hit, then scored on Franklin Gutierrez's RBI groundout. The crowd stood and chanted "I-chi-ro!"
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