CollectionsJoe Lovano
IN THE NEWS

Joe Lovano

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1996 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
At the end of his spirited second set Saturday at the Blue Moon, saxophonist Joe Lovano shouted, "That set was dedicated to all the great musicians who came from this city - Benny Golson, Jimmy Heath, the Heath Brothers. We could be here all night naming 'em!" He was leaving the bandstand at the time, but Lovano's comment was no afterthought: Throughout the hour-long performance, he evoked the spirit of a few important artists associated with the area, including, on the prayerlike incantation "Ft. Worth," John Coltrane.
NEWS
January 21, 2013 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
Dressed from head to toe in shades of red, saxophonist Joe Lovano looked as colorful as the arrays of flowers that surrounded him in Longwood Gardens' conservatory Saturday night. Bounding across the ballroom stage, juggling several exotic horns in addition to his trademark tenor saxophone, Lovano led his Us Five quintet through a set no less bursting with radiant colors. Us Five has been Lovano's primary vehicle since 2009, and the group has grown to embody the collective identity suggested by its name.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1996 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With 1996 well into the home stretch, fans of Joe Lovano are wondering if the tenor saxophonist can possibly rack up a greater number of honors than he received last year. The 1995 Down Beat Critics and Readers Poll named Lovano Jazz Artist of the Year. This same poll also honored him as Tenor Player of the Year, and the musician's Blue Note release Rush Hour was declared Album of the Year by Down Beat. As a follow-up to Rush Hour, this year's Lovano contribution to the world of music was an ambitious double CD set titled Quartets Live at the Village Vanguard.
NEWS
June 25, 2002 | By Nathaniel Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
On Sunday night at the Painted Bride Art Center, tenor saxophonist Joe Lovano proved that comfort level is the difference between high-concept and gimmickry. Playing selections from the self-explanatory Viva Caruso, Lovano's quirky Street Band, which closed the Mellon Jazz Festival, never once forced the issue. In the truest spirit of improvisation, the group used Enrico Caruso-related selections as the jumping-off point for variations, creating not only unexpected solos but also an ensemble sound that responded to the demands of the moment.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1999 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For saxophonist Joe Lovano, playing with innocence is among the most important qualities to have as a musician. "It's the sensibility of being free, or relaxed," Lovano said from his upstate New York home. "You must come into a situation without preconceived ideas, and let your melodies and harmonies take shape. That is not only for us onstage. You also have to involve the audience. Too much music is just played at an audience. The way to perform well is to create a new experience every time, whether you have played a tune once or a thousand times.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2011 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
You can't blame Chris Potter for being a little flummoxed. Tasked with composing a new piece of music based on one of the paintings in the Philadelphia Museum of Art's collection, the saxophonist was handed not a lush, colorful masterpiece of French impressionism or an explosion of color à la Jackson Pollock, but a stark, austere black-on-white piece by the minimalist Ellsworth Kelly. "To be honest," Potter recalls, "my first reaction when I saw it was, 'Wow, what on Earth am I going to do with this?
NEWS
February 22, 2010 | By Eric Fine FOR THE INQUIRER
McCoy Tyner's performance Friday at the Kimmel Center in Center City owed refreshingly little to John Coltrane. Tyner, the pianist in Coltrane's groundbreaking quartet, made no references to the iconic saxophonist, musically or otherwise, perhaps because the Tyner-Coltrane connection has been chronicled ad nauseam. Tyner, 71, performed with his regular trio plus tenor saxophonist Joe Lovano, who recently recovered from shoulder injuries that sidelined him for two months. The pair have worked together intermittently for several years, as in 2007's McCoy Tyner Quartet.
NEWS
February 9, 2001 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
Tenor saxophonist Frank Tiberi, leader of the Woody Herman Thundering Herd, teams up with fellow saxophonist George Garzone this weekend at Ortlieb's Jazzhaus. Tiberi and Garzone, who leads the band, the Fringe, appear together on Tiberi's release, "Tiberian Mode" (NY Jam Records), along with Joe Lovano. Ortlieb's is at 847 N. 3rd St. Sets start at 8:45 p.m. Info: 215-922-1035. Also on Saturday, St. Charles Catholic Church celebrates Black History Month with the "Jazz at St. Chaz" program celebrating the music of Miles Davis and John Coltrane.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1998 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
For the last few years, saxophonist and composer Joe Lovano has been working to escape the typical job description of the jazz musician. While still touring with several inventive small groups, he's recorded with chamber orchestras and written for new-music ensembles, and quietly developed a following as a musician capable of moving outside the confines of jazz. Sunday at the Clef Club, Lovano appeared with the String Trio of New York - guitarist James Emery, bassist John Lindberg, violinist Diane Monroe - in a program designed to accommodate his multiple interests.
NEWS
March 21, 2001 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
For an art form based on spontaneity, jazz recently has acquired a number of rules. Some say it has to have the spang-a-lang swing rhythm that became popular in the 1930s. Trumpeter Wynton Marsalis goes further, decreeing that it must have a certain degree of blues feeling. Saxophonist and composer Joe Lovano, who performs at the Convention Center on Friday as part of the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society series, argues for something simpler. "Jazz is about being creative with the material and the people you're playing with," he said this week.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 20, 2016
Southern Family (Low Country/Elektra **1/2) If there's a unifying figure in the Nashville country-flavored singer-songwriter renaissance, it's Dave Cobb. The producer has helmed projects by Grammy-winners Chris Stapleton and Jason Isbell, as well as Sturgill Simpson and Shooter Jennings, while branching out with the Boston pop quartet Lake Street Dive. The Cobb-assembled Southern Family showcases that Music City community with a set of songs that aim to say something meaningful about blood ties and Southern identity.
NEWS
January 21, 2013 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
Dressed from head to toe in shades of red, saxophonist Joe Lovano looked as colorful as the arrays of flowers that surrounded him in Longwood Gardens' conservatory Saturday night. Bounding across the ballroom stage, juggling several exotic horns in addition to his trademark tenor saxophone, Lovano led his Us Five quintet through a set no less bursting with radiant colors. Us Five has been Lovano's primary vehicle since 2009, and the group has grown to embody the collective identity suggested by its name.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2011 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
You can't blame Chris Potter for being a little flummoxed. Tasked with composing a new piece of music based on one of the paintings in the Philadelphia Museum of Art's collection, the saxophonist was handed not a lush, colorful masterpiece of French impressionism or an explosion of color à la Jackson Pollock, but a stark, austere black-on-white piece by the minimalist Ellsworth Kelly. "To be honest," Potter recalls, "my first reaction when I saw it was, 'Wow, what on Earth am I going to do with this?
NEWS
February 22, 2010 | By Eric Fine FOR THE INQUIRER
McCoy Tyner's performance Friday at the Kimmel Center in Center City owed refreshingly little to John Coltrane. Tyner, the pianist in Coltrane's groundbreaking quartet, made no references to the iconic saxophonist, musically or otherwise, perhaps because the Tyner-Coltrane connection has been chronicled ad nauseam. Tyner, 71, performed with his regular trio plus tenor saxophonist Joe Lovano, who recently recovered from shoulder injuries that sidelined him for two months. The pair have worked together intermittently for several years, as in 2007's McCoy Tyner Quartet.
NEWS
June 25, 2002 | By Nathaniel Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
On Sunday night at the Painted Bride Art Center, tenor saxophonist Joe Lovano proved that comfort level is the difference between high-concept and gimmickry. Playing selections from the self-explanatory Viva Caruso, Lovano's quirky Street Band, which closed the Mellon Jazz Festival, never once forced the issue. In the truest spirit of improvisation, the group used Enrico Caruso-related selections as the jumping-off point for variations, creating not only unexpected solos but also an ensemble sound that responded to the demands of the moment.
NEWS
March 21, 2001 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
For an art form based on spontaneity, jazz recently has acquired a number of rules. Some say it has to have the spang-a-lang swing rhythm that became popular in the 1930s. Trumpeter Wynton Marsalis goes further, decreeing that it must have a certain degree of blues feeling. Saxophonist and composer Joe Lovano, who performs at the Convention Center on Friday as part of the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society series, argues for something simpler. "Jazz is about being creative with the material and the people you're playing with," he said this week.
NEWS
February 9, 2001 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
Tenor saxophonist Frank Tiberi, leader of the Woody Herman Thundering Herd, teams up with fellow saxophonist George Garzone this weekend at Ortlieb's Jazzhaus. Tiberi and Garzone, who leads the band, the Fringe, appear together on Tiberi's release, "Tiberian Mode" (NY Jam Records), along with Joe Lovano. Ortlieb's is at 847 N. 3rd St. Sets start at 8:45 p.m. Info: 215-922-1035. Also on Saturday, St. Charles Catholic Church celebrates Black History Month with the "Jazz at St. Chaz" program celebrating the music of Miles Davis and John Coltrane.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1999 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For saxophonist Joe Lovano, playing with innocence is among the most important qualities to have as a musician. "It's the sensibility of being free, or relaxed," Lovano said from his upstate New York home. "You must come into a situation without preconceived ideas, and let your melodies and harmonies take shape. That is not only for us onstage. You also have to involve the audience. Too much music is just played at an audience. The way to perform well is to create a new experience every time, whether you have played a tune once or a thousand times.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1998 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
For the last few years, saxophonist and composer Joe Lovano has been working to escape the typical job description of the jazz musician. While still touring with several inventive small groups, he's recorded with chamber orchestras and written for new-music ensembles, and quietly developed a following as a musician capable of moving outside the confines of jazz. Sunday at the Clef Club, Lovano appeared with the String Trio of New York - guitarist James Emery, bassist John Lindberg, violinist Diane Monroe - in a program designed to accommodate his multiple interests.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1996 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
At the end of his spirited second set Saturday at the Blue Moon, saxophonist Joe Lovano shouted, "That set was dedicated to all the great musicians who came from this city - Benny Golson, Jimmy Heath, the Heath Brothers. We could be here all night naming 'em!" He was leaving the bandstand at the time, but Lovano's comment was no afterthought: Throughout the hour-long performance, he evoked the spirit of a few important artists associated with the area, including, on the prayerlike incantation "Ft. Worth," John Coltrane.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|