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Joe Mullen

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SPORTS
March 20, 2007 | By Joe Logan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Records, of course, are made to be broken. But because it was Joe Mullen's career scoring record of 502 goals by an American in the NHL that got eclipsed Saturday night, you'd think he'd be at least a little bummed out. "Not at all," Mullen, 50, an assistant coach with the Philadelphia Phantoms who spent 16 years in the NHL, said. "I had the record for quite [a while]. I knew this day would come, and I'm happy a guy like Mike broke it. He's a quality guy and a role model for U.S. hockey.
SPORTS
December 21, 2008 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
During Flyers games, second-year assistant Joe Mullen sits at press level, higher than the nose-bleed sections, and is closer to the roof than the ice. Don't let his location fool you. Mullen, the Flyers' "eye in the sky," has a great view. He can see plays develop and can analyze what the team needs to do to make its power play work. The power play is Mullen's baby. Two-plus months into the season, that baby has matured into one of the NHL's most successful units. It has been attacking like Don Rickles in his prime - and has been one of the main reasons for the club's climb in the Atlantic Division standings.
SPORTS
February 8, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
The Pittsburgh Penguins didn't have Mario Lemieux, Tom Barrasso, Kevin Stevens or Luc Robitaille. The Florida Panthers didn't have a chance. The Penguins didn't miss their absent All-Stars, getting two goals and two assists from 1,000-point scorer Joe Mullen last night to beat the usually defense-minded Panthers, 7-3. Mullen, who will turn 38 later this month, became the first American-born player and the 42nd in NHL history to reach 1,000...
SPORTS
November 14, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Joe Mullen knew all about toughness, growing up playing street hockey in New York - in a Westside Manhattan neighborhood known as Hell's Kitchen. But it didn't prepare him for the rigors of a career on ice, in the NHL. "I remember looking at the other team out of the corner of my eye, and thinking, 'What am I doing here?' " Mullen said last night in Toronto, where he was one of four people inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame. Mullen credited former NHL coach and executive Emile Francis for paving the way. "Every once in a while in a lifetime a person comes along who changes your life," Mullen said.
SPORTS
November 21, 1991 | By Gary Miles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paul Holmgren looked demoralized. Mike Ricci seemed puzzled. Nobody, even the Flyers themselves, seemed to know what was going on with the team. The Flyers and their schizophrenic offense staggered into the Civic Arena to play the Pittsburgh Penguins last night and suffered a complete breakdown. Playing without winger Pelle Eklund, who bruised his left shoulder in the second period and did not return for the third period, the Flyers barely broke a sweat in a 5-2 loss to the Penguins.
SPORTS
January 31, 1991 | By Tom Mahon, Daily News Sports Writer
Everybody will be watching Pittsburgh's Mario Lemieux when the Penguins take the ice tonight against the Flyers at the Spectrum. And with good reason. The Penguins' superstar will be playing in just his third game since recovering from back surgery and a subsequent infection. He says he is still a bit rusty, but his performances say otherwise. He scored a goal and had an assist in a win over the visiting Capitals Tuesday night, and had three assists in a win in Quebec Saturday.
SPORTS
October 6, 1993 | By Bill Lyon, INQUIRER SPORTS COLUMNIST
P.S. The hockey season started last night. Suddenly, Philadelphia has an embarrassment of sporting riches. The old gray lady is aquiver with action. The baseball team, after a decade on short rations, begins the National League championship series tonight, as you might have heard. The football team is 4-0, and don't ask how. And now to add to the sensory overload, The Blade Runners are back. The Flyers launched the 1993-94 hockey season, their 27th, at the Spectrum last night with flames belching from the goal posts, music loud enough to deafen a jackhammer operator, the finger-snapping sound of small fireworks, laser lights dancing across the ice, and player introductions through a fog bank.
SPORTS
May 8, 1992 | By Ray Parrillo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Most Wanted Man in the Steel City, the New York Rangers' Adam Graves, helped add insult to the most celebrated injury of the hockey season by scoring the first goal against Pittsburgh last night. It was the final goal that hurt the Penguins the most, though. The final, ugly goal. Kris King's goal just 1 minute, 29 seconds into overtime, which caromed off goalie Tom Barrasso's leg pad, gave the Rangers a 6-5 victory at the Civic Arena and a 2-1 lead in the best-of-seven Patrick Division finals.
SPORTS
May 11, 1992 | By Ray Parrillo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rick Tocchet feels quite comfortable wearing the Pittsburgh Penguins' black and gold. Except when someone bumps into him. Kjell Samuelsson enjoys wearing the Penguins' colors, too, even though they clash with the ugly red lump on his left wrist. Tocchet, once the Flyers' poster boy and marquee player, and Samuelsson, a storklike defenseman whose workmanlike efficiency became a constant with the Flyers, are back in the Stanley Cup playoffs. They had to change teams to get there.
SPORTS
February 17, 1992 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
Some of this season's sessions with the Pittsburgh Penguins have been humiliating for the Flyers. In late November, the defending Stanley Cup champions hammered the Flyers, 9-3, at the Spectrum, a building where the Penguins once went 15 years without winning. The next night, the Flyers lost again, 5-1, in Pittsburgh, to drop their season record against the Pens to 0-4-1. The Penguins, once pushovers, were now the punishers. When the Penguins last saw the Flyers in November, they were spiritless and apparently doomed to a deserved spot in the NHL's Patrick Division basement.
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SPORTS
May 28, 2010 | By Ray Parrillo, Inquirer Staff Writer
The most decorated member of the Flyers' organization has a thick New York accent, plies his trade in relative anonymity, and couldn't be more unassuming. The name of Joe Mullen, a Flyers assistant coach whose primary responsibility is the power play, is etched into the Stanley Cup three times. He won it with Calgary in 1989 and twice with Pittsburgh, in 1991 and '92. Clearly, then, Mullen knows what it takes to survive the most grueling tournament in professional team sports. He is convinced that the Flyers have what it takes - talent, leadership, and togetherness - to upset the Chicago Blackhawks in what should be a fascinating duel for the Cup that begins Saturday in Chicago.
SPORTS
December 21, 2008 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
During Flyers games, second-year assistant Joe Mullen sits at press level, higher than the nose-bleed sections, and is closer to the roof than the ice. Don't let his location fool you. Mullen, the Flyers' "eye in the sky," has a great view. He can see plays develop and can analyze what the team needs to do to make its power play work. The power play is Mullen's baby. Two-plus months into the season, that baby has matured into one of the NHL's most successful units. It has been attacking like Don Rickles in his prime - and has been one of the main reasons for the club's climb in the Atlantic Division standings.
SPORTS
March 20, 2007 | By Joe Logan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Records, of course, are made to be broken. But because it was Joe Mullen's career scoring record of 502 goals by an American in the NHL that got eclipsed Saturday night, you'd think he'd be at least a little bummed out. "Not at all," Mullen, 50, an assistant coach with the Philadelphia Phantoms who spent 16 years in the NHL, said. "I had the record for quite [a while]. I knew this day would come, and I'm happy a guy like Mike broke it. He's a quality guy and a role model for U.S. hockey.
SPORTS
November 14, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Joe Mullen knew all about toughness, growing up playing street hockey in New York - in a Westside Manhattan neighborhood known as Hell's Kitchen. But it didn't prepare him for the rigors of a career on ice, in the NHL. "I remember looking at the other team out of the corner of my eye, and thinking, 'What am I doing here?' " Mullen said last night in Toronto, where he was one of four people inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame. Mullen credited former NHL coach and executive Emile Francis for paving the way. "Every once in a while in a lifetime a person comes along who changes your life," Mullen said.
SPORTS
February 8, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
The Pittsburgh Penguins didn't have Mario Lemieux, Tom Barrasso, Kevin Stevens or Luc Robitaille. The Florida Panthers didn't have a chance. The Penguins didn't miss their absent All-Stars, getting two goals and two assists from 1,000-point scorer Joe Mullen last night to beat the usually defense-minded Panthers, 7-3. Mullen, who will turn 38 later this month, became the first American-born player and the 42nd in NHL history to reach 1,000...
SPORTS
October 6, 1993 | By Bill Lyon, INQUIRER SPORTS COLUMNIST
P.S. The hockey season started last night. Suddenly, Philadelphia has an embarrassment of sporting riches. The old gray lady is aquiver with action. The baseball team, after a decade on short rations, begins the National League championship series tonight, as you might have heard. The football team is 4-0, and don't ask how. And now to add to the sensory overload, The Blade Runners are back. The Flyers launched the 1993-94 hockey season, their 27th, at the Spectrum last night with flames belching from the goal posts, music loud enough to deafen a jackhammer operator, the finger-snapping sound of small fireworks, laser lights dancing across the ice, and player introductions through a fog bank.
SPORTS
May 11, 1992 | By Ray Parrillo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rick Tocchet feels quite comfortable wearing the Pittsburgh Penguins' black and gold. Except when someone bumps into him. Kjell Samuelsson enjoys wearing the Penguins' colors, too, even though they clash with the ugly red lump on his left wrist. Tocchet, once the Flyers' poster boy and marquee player, and Samuelsson, a storklike defenseman whose workmanlike efficiency became a constant with the Flyers, are back in the Stanley Cup playoffs. They had to change teams to get there.
SPORTS
May 9, 1992 | By Ray Parrillo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Adam Graves of the New York Rangers was suspended for four games yesterday for the nasty, two-handed chop that knocked Pittsburgh star Mario Lemieux out of the NHL Patrick Division finals. Understandably, the Penguins planned no celebration. The suspension of Graves is a trade-off the Rangers would make in a heartbeat. For it is Pittsburgh that has suffered the more severe punishment from the ugly incident in which Lemieux's left hand was broken early in Tuesday's Game 2 at Madison Square Garden.
SPORTS
May 8, 1992 | By Ray Parrillo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Most Wanted Man in the Steel City, the New York Rangers' Adam Graves, helped add insult to the most celebrated injury of the hockey season by scoring the first goal against Pittsburgh last night. It was the final goal that hurt the Penguins the most, though. The final, ugly goal. Kris King's goal just 1 minute, 29 seconds into overtime, which caromed off goalie Tom Barrasso's leg pad, gave the Rangers a 6-5 victory at the Civic Arena and a 2-1 lead in the best-of-seven Patrick Division finals.
SPORTS
February 17, 1992 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
Some of this season's sessions with the Pittsburgh Penguins have been humiliating for the Flyers. In late November, the defending Stanley Cup champions hammered the Flyers, 9-3, at the Spectrum, a building where the Penguins once went 15 years without winning. The next night, the Flyers lost again, 5-1, in Pittsburgh, to drop their season record against the Pens to 0-4-1. The Penguins, once pushovers, were now the punishers. When the Penguins last saw the Flyers in November, they were spiritless and apparently doomed to a deserved spot in the NHL's Patrick Division basement.
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