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Joe Sestak

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NEWS
October 25, 2010
THIS CAMPAIGN season has been one of extremes: extreme candidates making extreme claims about what's wrong with the country and how to fix it. To us, the most extreme claim is that the government had no business spending $787 billion on the Recovery Act when the free market would have done a better job correcting the economic meltdown. Especially since the free, unregulated market helped cause the meltdown, triggered by banks that pushed toxic mortgages and then sold them bundled as securities.
NEWS
August 11, 2010 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
SCRANTON - Former President Bill Clinton's signature campaign song was always "Don't Stop" (thinkin' about tomorrow) by Fleetwood Mac, and, on cue, the anthem blasted off the walls of the Scranton High School gym Tuesday as he campaigned for Democratic Senate nominee Joe Sestak. But mostly Clinton wanted to talk about yesterday - the budget surplus and 20 million jobs created under his administration. It makes no sense to elect Republicans whose policies created the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression because the Democrats have not fixed it yet, Clinton argued.
NEWS
May 6, 2010
A heated dispute around Rep. Joe Sestak's Navy record has become a central issue in his Democratic primary Senate race against incumbent Arlen Specter. The best way for Sestak to resolve the issue would be for him to release his Navy records. The dispute centers on an ad by Specter's campaign that said Sestak was relieved of his post as chief of planning for the Navy because he created a "poor command climate. " That's according to a 2005 Navy Times article cited by the TV ad. Pentagon sources have confirmed the Navy Times report to multiple news organizations.
NEWS
October 25, 2006
Pa. Seventh District Historically Republican, the district covering most of Delaware and parts of Chester and Montgomery Counties voted Democratic in the last three presidential elections. The Case for Sestak Retired admiral, U.S. Navy Democrat, 54 Wallingford This seat, held by Weldon for 20 years, is ripe for a change. Sestak, a career naval officer, is a political novice - and it shows. But he's benefited from the mounting ethical woes of the GOP majority on Capitol Hill, including Weldon's.
NEWS
May 10, 2010 | By Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last week, Sen. Arlen Specter's campaign bought thousands of ad minutes on Philadelphia black-oriented radio stations to air a clip of President Obama's praising him. And Phillies shortstop Jimmy Rollins made robo-calls to city Democratic voters saying that Specter has "proven he's on our team" by supporting the economic-stimulus and health-care overhaul. For Specter, surviving the Democratic Senate primary against Rep. Joe Sestak may well come down to his hometown, the city that launched his long political career in 1965, when he was elected district attorney - as a Republican.
NEWS
August 20, 2006 | By Todd Mason INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a response to President Bush's weekly radio address yesterday, Democratic congressional candidate Joe Sestak urged the Bush administration to "speak honestly" about the true cost of the war in Iraq. "For the cost of two days in Iraq we could screen 100 percent of all air cargo on passenger planes," said Sestak, a retired Navy admiral who is mounting a serious challenge to U.S. Rep. Curt Weldon (R., Pa.) Sestak returned to his hometown of Springfield, Delaware County, in January after earning three stars and serving tours of duty in the White House and Pentagon.
NEWS
October 21, 2006 | By Todd Mason INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Labeling himself an underdog in an increasingly bitter race, U.S. Rep. Curt Weldon (R., Pa.) mounted a furious attack on Democratic opponent Joe Sestak in the pair's final debate yesterday. "My opponent can throw out all the crap he wants about my kids, but in the end, the people of this district will decide," Weldon told a mostly friendly audience at the Delaware County Chamber of Commerce event. The FBI is probing whether Weldon helped his daughter Karen and friend Charles P. Sexton Jr. land $1 million in contracts from a Russian energy firm and a Serbian family with ties to Slobodan Milosevic.
NEWS
April 26, 2014 | By Gary Miles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard J. Sestak, 54, of Springfield, Delaware County, brother of and campaign manager for former U.S. Rep. Joe Sestak, died of complications from cancer Wednesday, April 23, at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Sestak grew up in Springfield, and graduated from Cardinal O'Hara High School, Villanova University, and Villanova University School of Law. He started his law career in New York City, in the capital markets group of Price Waterhouse and went on to practice as a commercial litigator at Kittredge Donley in Philadelphia, and Baker & McKenzie, Brown & Winfield, and Ropes & Majeski in Los Angeles.
NEWS
June 4, 2010
ARLEN Specter lost my vote when he ran an ad against Joe Sestak's military record, especially since he never served in the military. Also, no one is owed a government job forever. Specter has been feeding at the trough long enough. Give someone else a chance. J.W. Daniels, Philadelphia Arlen "Single-bullet" Specter lost. Now the real Democrats may thank their lucky stars. Mark. A. Vare, Philadelphia
NEWS
October 25, 2010
In the Senate race, we endorse Joe Sestak for his support of key issues like: Sestak's military background adds strength to his arguments, made during Friday's debate, for banning assault weapons; Toomey's self-described (and contempible) view of gun contro l is "a steady aim. " Sestak believes the stimulus bil l should have been bigger; Toomey believes the free market would have corrected the economic meltdown. Sestak supports tax cuts for the middle class; Toomey supports making high income-tax cuts permanent.
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NEWS
January 12, 2016 | By Jonathan Tamari, WASHINGTON BUREAU
WASHINGTON - As global conflict dominated headlines, national security grabbed the spotlight last week in the U.S. Senate race in Pennsylvania, offering a glimpse of a debate that could prove critical in this fall's election. Sen. Pat Toomey, a Republican seeking a second term, sought to flex his foreign-policy muscles, blasting President Obama - and his Democratic challengers - over the international nuclear deal with Iran and that country's recent ballistic missile tests. "It's extremely dangerous if the administration goes ahead and rewards the Iranians' egregiously bad behavior," Toomey told reporters in a conference call Tuesday, the same day he used an op-ed piece published in The Inquirer to urge the president not to lift sanctions.
NEWS
January 10, 2016 | By Jonathan Tamari, WASHINGTON BUREAU
WASHINGTON - The new year has brought a fresh wave of activity in the widely watched U.S. Senate race in Pennsylvania - and a surprising assessment from the state's Democratic Party leader. In an interview Thursday, Chairman Marcel Groen said that Braddock Mayor John Fetterman - the least-known, least-funded, and last Democrat to join the race - could represent the party's best chance to win. Fetterman would "be the toughest candidate" in a general election matchup against Sen. Pat Toomey, Groen told the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review.
NEWS
December 10, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - If one day could crystallize the budding U.S. Senate race in Pennsylvania, it may have come Tuesday. In Philadelphia, candidate Katie McGinty embraced more support from the Democratic establishment, racking up endorsements from Mayor Nutter, the city controller, and eight City Council members. Her chief rival, Joe Sestak, planned policy events on housing laws and the fight against ISIS, while a third Democrat, Braddock Mayor John Fetterman, reinforced his maverick image with a one-sentence headline-grabbing campaign announcement: "Donald Trump is a jagoff.
NEWS
November 6, 2015 | Philly Clout
U.S. SENATE candidate John Fetterman is a tattooed 6-8 behemoth from the Pittsburgh suburbs who looks like the bar bouncer in a drunken nightmare where you wake up in a cold sweat right before his bowling-ball-size fist collides with your face. But! We can confirm he ain't like that. He won't even punch you in the face if you puke on his shoes. Meet Jay Kyda , 36, a welder who makes furniture for a living and happened to vomit on Fetterman outside a rave about eight years ago. Kyda, who lives in Pittsburgh, reminded Fetterman, the mayor of Braddock, Pa., about the incident on the candidate's Facebook page a couple of weeks ago: "I was half expecting you to kick my ass after I looked up, but you couldn't have been nicer about it. Helped me clean myself up and got me to my friend's car where I slept it off. I didn't know who you were until some friends told me about it later.
NEWS
September 11, 2015
IN THESE days of partisan politics, we need politically independent candidates. I'm tired of politicians who are devoted to party leaders rather than the people who elected them. We must support candidates who are not afraid to be different. We are lucky to have someone who will speak independently for Pennsylvanians. Joe Sestak is that person. Sestak, a former three star admiral who was director of the Navy's anti-terrorism unit after the horror of 9/11, years ago started the trend of being a candidate for the people; long before candidates like Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders.
NEWS
August 27, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Democrats Joe Sestak and Katie McGinty fare equally in potential matchups against Pennsylvania Sen. Pat Toomey, though the Republican incumbent holds a large advantage over both, according to a new Quinnipiac University poll. The survey, the first since McGinty announced her candidacy this month, shows Toomey leading Sestak by 48-33 and McGinty 48-32. The poll provides an early snapshot of a race expected to be critical to deciding control of the Senate. Sestak, a former admiral and Delaware County congressman, has been laying the groundwork for years for a potential rematch with Toomey, and launched his campaign in March.
NEWS
August 11, 2015
KATIE McGINTY, former Pennsylvania environmental secretary, former Democratic gubernatorial candidate, former chief of staff to Gov. Wolf, last week announced her candidacy for U.S. Senate. She wants the seat now held by Sen. Pat Toomey, who's up for re-election next year. McGinty sat down for a Q&A with Daily News political columnist John Baer. Q: You're a Northeast Philly neighborhood native, large family, dad was a cop. How did your upbringing influence your life priorities?
NEWS
August 2, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two hours and two Philadelphia blocks apart, U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey and challenger Joe Sestak traded major policy speeches Friday on Iran, offering the first blow-for-blow exchange of a widely watched Senate election that is still 15 months off. Toomey (R., Pa.) told an audience at the Jewish Federation of Greater Philadelphia that the Iran nuclear agreement was a threat to national security. He did not mention Sestak. But in a news release earlier in the day, he jabbed at the former Delaware County congressman's support for the deal.
NEWS
July 30, 2015
ISSUE | SCHOOL FUNDS Twinned with reform In their commentary arguing for more school funding before reform, Adam Schott and David Lapp omit the chronology ("Before reform, fund properly," July 23). In all of the states they cite - Louisiana, Tennessee, and Massachusetts - reform preceded more funding. In Louisiana, the Legislature created the Recovery School District two years before the state received a large influx of federal and philanthropic money to help rebuild after Hurricane Katrina.
NEWS
July 21, 2015
LET'S TAKE a peek inside Katie McGinty's tug of war. We know there is one. Otherwise she'd simply say, "I am not a candidate for U.S. Senate. " That would end speculation that started in May, after Montco Commissioner Josh Shapiro said he won't run against Republican Pat Toomey next year. So, just the fact that McGinty's not talking shows, as one source close to her put it, she's "seriously, seriously considering. " She needs to make a decision soon because as Gov. Wolf's chief of staff she's a distraction to the many distractions keeping the governor and GOP lawmakers from agreeing on a now three-week-late budget.
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