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Joel Rosenman

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NEWS
March 27, 1989 | By Amy Linn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Slap on the Santana drum solo. It's time to reminisce. Yes, nearly 20 years have passed since the three days of wonder at Max Yasgur's dairy farm, the festival that renamed a generation. Music, mind- altering drugs, music-altering minds, flowers blossoming from the collective unconscious of a half-million hippies - the Woodstock Music and Art Fair had it all. "The New York State Thruway is closed, man," Arlo Guthrie told the crowd with a chortle. "Lotta freaks. " Lotta profit, Guthrie might say today.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1989 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
Read all about it: four recently released books about Woodstock contain everything you wanted to know about the rock festival, and a lot you didn't. YOUNG MEN WITH UNLIMITED CAPITAL, by Joel Rosenman, John Roberts and Robert Pilpel (Bantam, $8.95) - A surprisingly candid first-person account of how Woodstock came together. Rosenman and Roberts, who bankrolled the festival, pitch some very entertaining inside baseball, such as Jimi Hendrix's fee ($36,000, the most paid to any Woodstock performer)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1994 | By David Hinckley, NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
The producers of the Woodstock and Bethel festivals settled a two-day lawsuit Tuesday, letting them return their focus to the more serious challenge of ticket sales. Both Woodstock '94, to be held in Saugerties, N.Y., and Bethel '94, to be held on the site of the 1969 Woodstock festival in Bethel, are scheduled for Aug. 12-14. Organizers of each have thousands of tickets left with just over two weeks to show time. Woodstock '94, which has bigger stars such as Aerosmith, the Red Hot Chili Peppers and Bob Dylan, hopes for a crowd of 250,000.
NEWS
February 3, 1994 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Two well-heeled Philadelphia business school graduates with no entertainment experience were persuaded to finance the historic Woodstock festival in 1969. So why shouldn't local business types do it again, 25 years later? Veteran concert producer Sid Bernstein came to Philadelphia from New York yesterday to announce his partnership with Blue Bell-based businessmen Jack Oliver, Henry Schaufelberger and Calvin Dubrow. They will produce the smaller of two proposed concert gatherings in upstate New York that will commemorate the silver anniversary of the festival that rocked the world.
NEWS
August 11, 1989 | By David Hinckley, New York Daily News
To the disappointment of the media, original Woodstock financiers Joel Rosenman and John Roberts, and nostalgic rock fans everywhere, no single major event this month will mark the 20th anniversary of the festival that drew 400,000 people to Max Yasgur's farm in Bethel, N.Y., Aug. 15-17, 1969. Rosenman and Roberts wanted a big show and still do. But Dave Feldman, spokesman for their Woodstock Ventures Inc., says they were unable to complete a deal with Warner Bros. - to whom they sold most Woodstock rights in early 1970 - in time for this year.
LIVING
July 28, 1994 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story contains information from the Associated Press, the New York Daily News, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post and USA Today
If Chelsea Clinton, 14, wants to go to Woodstock '94, her parents ought to let her. That's what Molly Rosenman, also 14, has asked her father, Joel Rosenman, one of the festival producers, to convey to President Clinton and Hillary Rodham Clinton. Rosenman pere said he'd try. "We can guarantee there would be responsible adult supervision at all times," he said. "We've already arranged that for Molly. " He also said that while the performers are pretty well lined up, he'd make room for President Clinton if the President wants to bring his saxophone.
LIVING
October 5, 1993 | By W. Speers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story also cointains material from the Associated Press, the New York Daily News and USA Today
Michael Lang, Joel Rosenman and Penn grad John Roberts, organizers of the Woodstock concert in 1969, have sealed a deal to throw a 25th anniversary concert near the sacred ground Aug. 13 and 14, the New York Post reports. The paper said the trio recently got approval from the Saugerties, N.Y., town board to do the gig on 750-acre Winston Farms near Exit 20 off the New York State Thruway. Tix to "Woodstock 94" will be $100 - it was $18 to the 1969 version - and about 250,000 music lovers are expected.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1994 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Less than five weeks to go before Woodstock '94. Have you cashed in those municipal bonds yet? Organizers of the Aug. 13-14 mega-concert, to be held on 840 acres of farmland in Saugerties, N.Y., continue to add acts to a stellar lineup. (On Tuesday, Blind Melon, Primus, Youssou N'Dour, Traffic, the Band and Salt N' Pepa joined a bill that already included artists such as Aerosmith, Alice in Chains, Arrested Development, Johnny Cash, the Cranberries, Cypress Hill, Bob Dylan, Melissa Etheridge, Peter Gabriel, Green Day, Metallica, Nine Inch Nails and Red Hot Chili Peppers.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2009 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
SEVERAL OUTDOOR, multi-day music festivals were held in the summer of '69, including, in our own back yard, the Atlantic City Pop Festival at the shore town's racetrack. All were celebrating a seismic explosion in conscious rock - music spirited by the Beatles, Bob Dylan and "the movements" (anti-war, civil rights, feminist, ecological, psychedelic) and proffered by the likes of Jefferson Airplane, Santana, Janis Joplin, the Who, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Canned Heat, Joe Cocker and the Band.
NEWS
August 13, 1994 | By Mark Davis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Woodstock '94, multicolored and multicultural, tie-dyed and T-shirted, wild-haired and laid back, bare-topped and bottom-lined, cloned after another festival in what seems a lifetime ago, debuted in the dust and din yesterday. Thousands came. They spent millions. Ulster County, N.Y., a normally quiet place about 100 miles north of New York City, rocked, rolled and readied to recoil as people came from across the country and world. This is a town where the regular police force numbers 32. Residents remembered the other celebration of peace and love that took place not far from here a quarter-century before, and some feared a repeat of that.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2009 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
SEVERAL OUTDOOR, multi-day music festivals were held in the summer of '69, including, in our own back yard, the Atlantic City Pop Festival at the shore town's racetrack. All were celebrating a seismic explosion in conscious rock - music spirited by the Beatles, Bob Dylan and "the movements" (anti-war, civil rights, feminist, ecological, psychedelic) and proffered by the likes of Jefferson Airplane, Santana, Janis Joplin, the Who, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Canned Heat, Joe Cocker and the Band.
NEWS
August 13, 1994 | By Mark Davis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Woodstock '94, multicolored and multicultural, tie-dyed and T-shirted, wild-haired and laid back, bare-topped and bottom-lined, cloned after another festival in what seems a lifetime ago, debuted in the dust and din yesterday. Thousands came. They spent millions. Ulster County, N.Y., a normally quiet place about 100 miles north of New York City, rocked, rolled and readied to recoil as people came from across the country and world. This is a town where the regular police force numbers 32. Residents remembered the other celebration of peace and love that took place not far from here a quarter-century before, and some feared a repeat of that.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1994 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
If it wasn't called Woodstock, would we still care? Even when we're pretty sure we won't leave camp with any new deep thoughts about peace, love and understanding? Alas, we must. The sheer magnitude of Woodstock '94 makes it news: The 2 1/ 2 days of music, to begin Friday night on a farm in Saugerties, N.Y., could draw as many as a quarter-million people (though only 156,000 tickets have been sold so far). Millions of gallons of water are stored in tanks built specially for the event.
LIVING
July 28, 1994 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story contains information from the Associated Press, the New York Daily News, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post and USA Today
If Chelsea Clinton, 14, wants to go to Woodstock '94, her parents ought to let her. That's what Molly Rosenman, also 14, has asked her father, Joel Rosenman, one of the festival producers, to convey to President Clinton and Hillary Rodham Clinton. Rosenman pere said he'd try. "We can guarantee there would be responsible adult supervision at all times," he said. "We've already arranged that for Molly. " He also said that while the performers are pretty well lined up, he'd make room for President Clinton if the President wants to bring his saxophone.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1994 | By David Hinckley, NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
The producers of the Woodstock and Bethel festivals settled a two-day lawsuit Tuesday, letting them return their focus to the more serious challenge of ticket sales. Both Woodstock '94, to be held in Saugerties, N.Y., and Bethel '94, to be held on the site of the 1969 Woodstock festival in Bethel, are scheduled for Aug. 12-14. Organizers of each have thousands of tickets left with just over two weeks to show time. Woodstock '94, which has bigger stars such as Aerosmith, the Red Hot Chili Peppers and Bob Dylan, hopes for a crowd of 250,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1994 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Less than five weeks to go before Woodstock '94. Have you cashed in those municipal bonds yet? Organizers of the Aug. 13-14 mega-concert, to be held on 840 acres of farmland in Saugerties, N.Y., continue to add acts to a stellar lineup. (On Tuesday, Blind Melon, Primus, Youssou N'Dour, Traffic, the Band and Salt N' Pepa joined a bill that already included artists such as Aerosmith, Alice in Chains, Arrested Development, Johnny Cash, the Cranberries, Cypress Hill, Bob Dylan, Melissa Etheridge, Peter Gabriel, Green Day, Metallica, Nine Inch Nails and Red Hot Chili Peppers.
NEWS
February 3, 1994 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Two well-heeled Philadelphia business school graduates with no entertainment experience were persuaded to finance the historic Woodstock festival in 1969. So why shouldn't local business types do it again, 25 years later? Veteran concert producer Sid Bernstein came to Philadelphia from New York yesterday to announce his partnership with Blue Bell-based businessmen Jack Oliver, Henry Schaufelberger and Calvin Dubrow. They will produce the smaller of two proposed concert gatherings in upstate New York that will commemorate the silver anniversary of the festival that rocked the world.
LIVING
October 5, 1993 | By W. Speers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story also cointains material from the Associated Press, the New York Daily News and USA Today
Michael Lang, Joel Rosenman and Penn grad John Roberts, organizers of the Woodstock concert in 1969, have sealed a deal to throw a 25th anniversary concert near the sacred ground Aug. 13 and 14, the New York Post reports. The paper said the trio recently got approval from the Saugerties, N.Y., town board to do the gig on 750-acre Winston Farms near Exit 20 off the New York State Thruway. Tix to "Woodstock 94" will be $100 - it was $18 to the 1969 version - and about 250,000 music lovers are expected.
NEWS
August 11, 1989 | By David Hinckley, New York Daily News
To the disappointment of the media, original Woodstock financiers Joel Rosenman and John Roberts, and nostalgic rock fans everywhere, no single major event this month will mark the 20th anniversary of the festival that drew 400,000 people to Max Yasgur's farm in Bethel, N.Y., Aug. 15-17, 1969. Rosenman and Roberts wanted a big show and still do. But Dave Feldman, spokesman for their Woodstock Ventures Inc., says they were unable to complete a deal with Warner Bros. - to whom they sold most Woodstock rights in early 1970 - in time for this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1989 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
Read all about it: four recently released books about Woodstock contain everything you wanted to know about the rock festival, and a lot you didn't. YOUNG MEN WITH UNLIMITED CAPITAL, by Joel Rosenman, John Roberts and Robert Pilpel (Bantam, $8.95) - A surprisingly candid first-person account of how Woodstock came together. Rosenman and Roberts, who bankrolled the festival, pitch some very entertaining inside baseball, such as Jimi Hendrix's fee ($36,000, the most paid to any Woodstock performer)
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