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Joey Coyle

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2000 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Even before he makes the unwise mistake of getting into a fender-bender with a spiffy new Jaguar driven by a very large gangster, Suzuki is having a bad day in Shinobu Yaguchi's aptly named Adrenaline Drive. Tyrannized to the point of misery by his superiors at the rental car company where he works, Suzuki would dearly love to quit, but he can't afford to. When he goes to the yakuza's headquarters to find out how much the gang plans to extort from him for denting the Jag, there is a massive explosion that leaves only Suzuki and the mob enforcer alive and a large sack of ill-gotten money in a case on the floor.
NEWS
March 1, 1986 | By DAVE RACHER, Daily News Staff Writer
Joey Coyle, the South Philadelphia longshoreman who became famous when he scooped up $1.2 million that fell from a Purolator armored truck in 1981, is broke, hooked on drugs and behind bars for violating probation. Coyle, 35, "couldn't take the pressure of finding the money and all the publicity that went with it," said his attorney, Harold M. Kane. "His drug habit worsened and he didn't know how to control it. He needs help. " After a jury acquitted Coyle "by reason of insanity" of stealing the Purolator money in March 1982, he turned to drugs as an outlet, said his attorney.
NEWS
August 18, 1993 | by Kurt Heine, Daily News Staff Writer
It was all too sudden. A shame, they kept saying as they passed the gray metal coffin, shaking their heads at the waxen corpse arranged on tufted blue satin. Just two nights after famed money-finder Joey Coyle ended his life by hanging, it was time to say goodbye. Everybody came. His pals were there. So were his family and longtime lawyer and friend, Harold Kane, the man who successfully defended Coyle against charges that he stole a million bucks that fell off the back of an armored truck 12 years ago. His girlfriend, Tish Konowal, who had argued with Coyle shortly before his suicide, handed out hugs from the third row of the crowded funeral parlor.
NEWS
August 19, 1993 | by Joseph R. Daughen, Daily News Staff Writer
Joey Coyle wrote what appears to be his last will and testament on June 18, almost two months before he committed suicide by hanging himself with an electrical extension cord. The document, hand-printed in red ink and shot through with spelling errors, directs that $50,000 of the $150,000 Coyle expected to receive for a movie about his life be given to his lawyer, Harold Kane. Kane did not respond to a request for comment. The remaining $100,000, and whatever else Coyle's estate may own, appears to be left to his girlfriend, Pauletta A. "Tish" Konowal.
NEWS
August 17, 1993
Joey, Joey, Joey. Didn't everybody who followed Joey Coyle's chance encounter with $1.2 million on the streets of South Philadelphia a dozen years ago shake their head and figure they'd handle it better - that, no way, would they let finding all that cash in a pair of bank bags make them crazy? Who's to say, though? Few, probably, would have met the same sad end as Joey Coyle, found hanged in his rowhouse Sunday at age 40 - the same weekend that previews for the movie about his six-day-escapade in 1981 hit local theaters.
NEWS
September 10, 1993 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Here's something to think about: To movie fans the world over, the characters most representative of contemporary Philadelphia are Rocky Balboa and now, thanks to "Money for Nothing," the late Joey Coyle. Not much difference between them, really - a couple of unemployed palookas, shuffling between a rowhouse and a corner saloon, drifting aimlessly through life until a freakish brush with fame and fortune. There is one obvious distinction. One character is made-up and one is real, although the Coyle we meet in "Money for Nothing" is nothing like the man who took his own life here last month.
NEWS
August 16, 1993 | by Sheila Simmons, Daily News Staff Writer
Everybody around 2nd and Shunk streets yesterday seemed to have a Joey Coyle story. Yet no one offered the one about his plucking $1.2 million from the trail of an armored truck in 1981 or mused about his adventure being made the subject of a soon-to-be-released Hollywood movie. Anna Benckert, 31, told how, when she sprained her foot, Coyle came across the street to help her wrap it. Larry Donia, 23, told how Coyle and his longtime girlfriend surprised him with a bottle of wine when he purchased a new car. Eleven-year-old Frank Seybold told how Coyle doted on his grandmother when his grandfather passed away.
NEWS
January 31, 1993 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joey Coyle sits on the soft gray couch with his lawyer, Harold Kane - maybe the only guy Joey really trusts anymore - and he's smoking a cigarette and talking about this Hollywood movie they'll start shooting tomorrow. It's the movie about what happened, y'know, with The Money. Feb. 26, 1981: Joey and these two other guys are driving down Swanson Street in South Philly. And they're behind this truck, this Purolator Armored Services truck. And it goes over a bump and the doors swing open and - Yes!
NEWS
August 16, 1993 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Anthony Chestnut wasn't buying it. He knew what they were saying, but he wasn't buying it for a minute. He and Joey Coyle went way back. They went all through Our Lady of Mount Carmel elementary school, and yesterday, Chestnut simply refused to believe that Coyle had taken his own life. "It doesn't make sense; something's wrong there," said Chestnut. "He loved life too much. . . . Joe had too much morals and too much backbone to kill himself. " Sure, Coyle and his girlfriend fought now and then, Chestnut said.
NEWS
August 19, 1993 | By Henry Goldman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a proper funeral in a magnificent stained-glass-windowed church, with hymns sweetly sung, gentle voices offering peace. If caskets were cars, this one would be a Cadillac: solid gray metal, ornamented, elegant. Flowers all around. From the words, it could have been anyone's funeral. Condolences went to the family, expressions of sadness and affection. No talk of the $1.2 million that fell out of a truck and into Joey Coyle's lap on Feb. 26, 1981. No talk of the soaring highs and demonic lows that characterized Coyle's tormented life.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2000 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Even before he makes the unwise mistake of getting into a fender-bender with a spiffy new Jaguar driven by a very large gangster, Suzuki is having a bad day in Shinobu Yaguchi's aptly named Adrenaline Drive. Tyrannized to the point of misery by his superiors at the rental car company where he works, Suzuki would dearly love to quit, but he can't afford to. When he goes to the yakuza's headquarters to find out how much the gang plans to extort from him for denting the Jag, there is a massive explosion that leaves only Suzuki and the mob enforcer alive and a large sack of ill-gotten money in a case on the floor.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1993 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Money talks, they say. What they don't say is that sometimes it squeals. Take the case of Joey Coyle, the unemployed South Philadelphia dockworker who stumbled on $1.2 million that literally fell off a truck. According to the Coyle biopic Money for Nothing, lucre was the drug to which Joey got addicted, like one of those prospectors who contracted gold fever during the California Gold Rush. He was so blind to everything except his hallucination of what money could buy that he blabbed about his good fortune to anyone who would listen, thus leading the police right to him. In the movie, writer-director Ramon Menendez, best known for another biographical moral tale, Stand and Deliver (about the inspirational math teacher Jaime Escalante)
NEWS
September 10, 1993 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For all of you who honestly believe that the story of your meager lives will make a great novel, for you who fantasize that some Hollywood dreamboat will play you in the movie version, and for you who still have faith in phrases like Rich and Famous and Happily Ever After; for youse guys they made the movie, Money For Nothing. It is a fantasy. It is not the real life story of South Philadelphia's Joey Coyle and that's OK with Detective Pat Laurenzi, who investigated the case of the $1.2 million that fell from an armored truck into Joey's lap back in 1981.
NEWS
September 10, 1993 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Here's something to think about: To movie fans the world over, the characters most representative of contemporary Philadelphia are Rocky Balboa and now, thanks to "Money for Nothing," the late Joey Coyle. Not much difference between them, really - a couple of unemployed palookas, shuffling between a rowhouse and a corner saloon, drifting aimlessly through life until a freakish brush with fame and fortune. There is one obvious distinction. One character is made-up and one is real, although the Coyle we meet in "Money for Nothing" is nothing like the man who took his own life here last month.
NEWS
September 8, 1993 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / JOHN COSTELLO
This moviegoer was among about 100 who got to see a preview of "Money for Nothing" yesterday at Sam's Place, 19th and Chestnut. The film is about former South Philadelphia resident Joey Coyle, who lucked into $1.2 million when it fell off an armored truck. Coyle was found dead, an apparent suicide, in his home on Aug. 15.
NEWS
August 30, 1993 | By QUINN ELI
It turns out the father of the Lakeberg twins has a criminal record and may well be facing a jail term for probation violation, and so all of a sudden donations to help the family's medical costs have taken a noticeable drop. Even those close to Kenneth Lakeberg worry openly about his admitted drug and alcohol use, and have made efforts to keep Lakeberg away from some of the money that has been raised to defray his daughters' hospital bills. Meanwhile, in California, Rodney King - whose name has become a symbol of the abuse and indignity suffered by oppressed people in this country - has been arrested for the fourth time since he became world-famous last year as the victim of a brutal and racially motivated attack by the Los Angeles police department.
NEWS
August 26, 1993
JOEY COYLE A 'HERO?' IS OUR POLL 'INSENSITIVE? I must express my disappointment with media coverage of the death of Joey Coyle. He was a man who had a troubled life and a sad death. The circumstances of his death have left his friends and relatives grieving. However, can anyone in good conscience call him a "hero"? A "hero" is someone "of distinguished valor or performance, admired for his noble qualities. " Does a hero take something that does not belong to him? Does he use and sell drugs?
NEWS
August 23, 1993 | BY ZACHARY STALBERG
Larry McMullen never sought the adoration of his peers. He wrote a column here for 20 years, but he was like the guy on the El who always picks a seat at the other end of the car. He didn't share the perspective of most journalists. His column showed contempt for politicians and little interest in policy, and he had no time for writers who were infatuated by either. On Inauguration Day, he wrote: It was only a day or two after the votes were in that a line appeared in newspapers that said Clinton's ascending to the presidency meant that "a long, dark night" was ending.
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