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Joffrey Ballet

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1993 | By Nancy Goldner, INQUIRER DANCE CRITIC
A few years ago when Laura Dean's troupe was performing her exquisite choral dances in Philadelphia, she mentioned that she had received lots of offers to do Broadway shows and other commercial work, but had declined them all. "It's not my metier," she said. Billboards, the Joffrey Ballet extravaganza to Prince's music, which was seen for the first time in New York on Tuesday at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, proves that Dean knows whereof she talks. The applause-machine effect she sought in this ballet had too many gears exposed.
NEWS
November 1, 1989 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
I know, I know: It is unpatriotic to dislike tributes to the grand American tradition of vaudeville. But it would be delusional to find anything admirable in Gerald Arpino's The Pantages and the Palace Present "Two-a-Day," a lead balloon that is the one premiere of the Joffrey Ballet's season at the City Center through Dec. 2. The ballet's title refers to the era when variety theaters presented motion pictures along with live variety acts of...
NEWS
March 26, 1988 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
At an age when most boys are trading baseball cards, Robert Joffrey was leafing through ballet books, looking at photographs of famous dancers in famous ballets. Youngsters interested in dance usually dream of becoming dancers or choreographers. But Mr. Joffrey, 57, who died yesterday in New York City of a liver ailment, once told an interviewer that his boyhood dream was to create a ballet company. Inspired by his books, his favorite pastime was to scribble down ideas for repertory and casting for his future troupe.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1992 | By Nancy Goldner, INQUIRER DANCE CRITIC
American Ballet Theater and the Joffrey Ballet, two of the nation's leading ballet troupes, have begun the new season facing deficits large enough to threaten their very survival. The Joffrey is reportedly more than $2 million in the red, and ABT between $4 million and $5 million. In addition, both New York-based troupes face cash-flow problems. ABT was forced to delay supplementary unemployment benefits to its dancers. A company official said that they had been paid Friday, a week late.
NEWS
October 14, 1995 | by Janet Anderson, Special to the Daily News
It's another season for Pennsylvania Ballet - and another executive director hangs his nameplate on the door. Lawrence E.Sterner, 44, general manager of American Ballet Theatre in New York was named this week to the local troupe's top administrative post, which he assumes Dec. 1. Sterner replaces Michael Gennaro, who held the job for just over a year before taking the managing director position at Steppenwolf Theatre Company in Chicago....
NEWS
December 24, 1996 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Lorraine L. Thomas McAdams, 67, founder and executive artistic director of the National Ballet Company of New Jersey, died Saturday at her Mount Laurel home from cancer. Born and raised in Philadelphia. Her early dance training started at age 4. During her dance career, she performed with the former Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, the La Scala Opera, the Metropolitan Opera Ballet, and for MGM. Mrs. McAdams career also included performing for Agnes DeMille and George Abbott in various productions, including Oklahoma on Broadway, as well as Song of Norway, Carousel, and Guys and Dolls.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1996 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"For you and I are past our dancing days," Juliet's father remarks early in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet. For Philadelphia, the dancing days are very much with us. Starting Wednesday and continuing through June 16 at the Academy of Music, the Pennsylvania Ballet will end its 32d season with Romeo and Juliet, the classic ballet with music by Prokofiev, based on Shakespeare's 400-year-old classic tale of the star-crossed lovers. The choreography for the Pennsylvania Ballet's Romeo and Juliet is by the late John Cranko.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1994 | By Nancy Goldner, INQUIRER DANCE CRITIC
Back in the golden days of yore - it was only a decade ago but it seems much longer - New Yorkers knew the Joffrey Ballet like the backs of their own hands. Familiarity bred a certain indulgence of the company's warts, for there was ample opportunity to enjoy its finer points. The company regularly performed in New York from eight to 12 weeks a year. Then financial troubles hit, and seasons in its home town became increasingly rare. This one is the Joffrey's first regular repertory season in New York in three years.
NEWS
October 15, 2013 | By Ellen Dunkel, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1961, George Balanchine summoned some of the nation's top ballet teachers to a seminar in New York, hub of the U.S. dance world and one of the few cities where professional ballet was being performed at the time. "Something has to happen," said the great choreographer and founder of the New York City Ballet and its School of American Ballet. "You're turning out more and more dancers. Where are they going to dance?" "If you really are serious, Mr. B.," said Barbara Weisberger, who had been his first child student (at age 8)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1992 | By Nancy Goldner, INQUIRER DANCE CRITIC
Ballets by Balanchine and three premieres by artistic director Christopher d'Amboise highlight the Pennsylvania Ballet's season for 1992-93. The company will present five different bills in addition to its annual Christmastime production of The Nutcracker. The first program, from Oct. 14 to 18 at the Merriam Theater, will feature a world premiere by d'Amboise. Balanchine's Rubies, to a jazzy Stravinsky score, and his tribute to the Scottish highlands, Scotch Symphony, complete the bill.
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NEWS
September 25, 2015 | By Ellen Dunkel, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the last five years, many ballet fans in this country have found it easier to see a foreign company dance than an American one, as Russia's Bolshoi Ballet has shown its full-length ballets in 1,000 movie theaters around the world. But now American companies are getting in on the act, with Lincoln Center at the Movies: Great American Dance , a five-film series that launches at 7 p.m. Thursday at Philadelphia's UA Riverview Plaza and at other theaters nationwide. First up, San Francisco Ballet's Romeo & Juliet . "As a dancer, I never had the opportunity to dance the role of Romeo," said Helgi Tomasson, San Francisco Ballet's artistic director and principal choreographer.
NEWS
October 15, 2013 | By Ellen Dunkel, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1961, George Balanchine summoned some of the nation's top ballet teachers to a seminar in New York, hub of the U.S. dance world and one of the few cities where professional ballet was being performed at the time. "Something has to happen," said the great choreographer and founder of the New York City Ballet and its School of American Ballet. "You're turning out more and more dancers. Where are they going to dance?" "If you really are serious, Mr. B.," said Barbara Weisberger, who had been his first child student (at age 8)
NEWS
April 24, 2005 | By Mary Anne Janco INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Start with Frank Sinatra's unforgettable love songs and a Broadway-inspired choreographer. Add just the right mix of elegant ballet and sultry jazz, and that's Frank's Place. With Frank's Place, choreographer Scott Jovovich has created a ballet set in a 1950s Chicago nightclub that's fun, warmly nostalgic and downright sizzling. The Brandywine Ballet Company premiere opens, with performances Saturday and next Sunday, at West Chester University's Emilie K. Asplundh Concert Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2003 | By Merilyn Jackson FOR THE INQUIRER
More than a handful of choreographers have based ballets on Serge Prokofiev's 1945 Cinderella score. A 1990 version masked the dancers as wooden dolls and limited their movement in disquieting ways. The version the Pennsylvania Ballet reprised at the Academy of Music beginning Thursday night, with its sumptuous, to-the-rafters sets, dazzling costumes, and live orchestra, is more reassuring. The Houston Ballet's Ben Stevenson premiered it in 1970 with the National Ballet of Washington, and the Pennsylvania Ballet took it into its repertoire in 1995, performing it again in 1998.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2003 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
PROKOFIEV'S "CINDERELLA," the Pennsylvania Ballet, choreographed by Ben Stevenson. Academy of Music, 8 tonight through May 10. The fairy tale "Cinderella" came from the East, was written down in German and then became popularized in France by Perrault. However, he mistranslated the German word vair with the French word verre, which eventually gave Cindy a slipper of glass instead of ermine. Opera, Disney and storybooks have celebrated this tale, but no one has told it more elegantly than Prokofiev, who finished the ballet music in 1945.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1997 | By Denis Hamill, NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
Her excellent, emotion-wracked performance in The Devil's Advocate will probably bring this young actress to the threshold of stardom, but seven short years ago, Charlize Theron was a frightened, confused 15-year-old girl living in her native South Africa. Her father had just died at the age of 43. The family's road-construction business was in danger of closing. Her dream of one day going to America to be a ballet dancer seemed more remote. "I was depressed, developed ulcers.
NEWS
December 24, 1996 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Lorraine L. Thomas McAdams, 67, founder and executive artistic director of the National Ballet Company of New Jersey, died Saturday at her Mount Laurel home from cancer. Born and raised in Philadelphia. Her early dance training started at age 4. During her dance career, she performed with the former Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, the La Scala Opera, the Metropolitan Opera Ballet, and for MGM. Mrs. McAdams career also included performing for Agnes DeMille and George Abbott in various productions, including Oklahoma on Broadway, as well as Song of Norway, Carousel, and Guys and Dolls.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1996 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"For you and I are past our dancing days," Juliet's father remarks early in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet. For Philadelphia, the dancing days are very much with us. Starting Wednesday and continuing through June 16 at the Academy of Music, the Pennsylvania Ballet will end its 32d season with Romeo and Juliet, the classic ballet with music by Prokofiev, based on Shakespeare's 400-year-old classic tale of the star-crossed lovers. The choreography for the Pennsylvania Ballet's Romeo and Juliet is by the late John Cranko.
NEWS
October 14, 1995 | by Janet Anderson, Special to the Daily News
It's another season for Pennsylvania Ballet - and another executive director hangs his nameplate on the door. Lawrence E.Sterner, 44, general manager of American Ballet Theatre in New York was named this week to the local troupe's top administrative post, which he assumes Dec. 1. Sterner replaces Michael Gennaro, who held the job for just over a year before taking the managing director position at Steppenwolf Theatre Company in Chicago....
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1995 | By Miriam Seidel, FOR THE INQUIRER
Strong dancing, new choreography and selections from an old standard made for a cover-all-bases evening with the Russian Ballet Theater of Delaware, performing over the weekend at Wilmington's Playhouse Theatre. Many companies now feel the pressure to offer this kind of pragmatic, smorgasbord programming. Artistic director Anya Patton Ward, however, is simultaneously reaching to solidify the profile of this young company - with its core of Russian emigres - bringing in top-notch guest artists and commissioning new work.
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