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NEWS
July 2, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
A bomb exploded at a bus stop in downtown Johannesburg yesterday and injured eight women and children. The blast came as a black labor federation threatened to conduct a work stoppage to protest the detention of union leaders. In other developments, South Africa formally repealed laws that restricted the movements of blacks and required that they always carry identity documents, called passes. The pass books will be replaced by a new identity document, which the government says will be identical for all races.
NEWS
January 30, 2000 | By Todd Pitock, FOR THE INQUIRER
I'm sitting in a shebeen, an African pub, in Soweto, the black township appended to the southwest corner of Johannesburg. It's a typically gorgeous afternoon in South Africa's highveld, while in here a crowd of about 25 people sit shoulder to shoulder on benches that line the room. One man, eyes bloodshot and sporting the blue work suit common among laborers here, makes a speech. He raises a glass of sorghum beer - a traditional home brew - and whatever he says, he's bringing the house down.
NEWS
March 29, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
A South African peace summit called to halt spiralling violence was canceled today when the Zulu king said his people needed time to bury their dead after yesterday's carnage in Johannesburg. Police said at least 51 people were killed and 173 wounded in Johannesburg and surrounding black townships in violence resulting from yesterday's Zulu march in the city. They said 33 people were killed and 156 wounded in Johannesburg and 18 killed and 17 wounded in Soweto and other townships around South Africa's commercial capital.
NEWS
July 2, 1986 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
Anyone who doesn't value America's constitutionally guaranteed freedom of the press should try decoding some of the stuff that's been coming out of Johannesburg lately. Take the gaping hole Maureen Johnson had to leave in her Associated Press report Monday about the arrest of the man who heads South Africa's largest labor federation, and whose continued detention could still provoke violent resistance to the government's current state of emergency. Wrote Johnson: "The president of the mainly black Congress of South African Trade Unions (Cosatu)
NEWS
September 15, 1990 | By Rick Lyman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leslie Masigo thought there was something suspicious about the young men clustered near the commuter train door, especially the one who seemed to have something long hidden up his sleeve. A member of the Pedi tribe of northern Transvaal, Masigo knew just enough Zulu to understand the command that passed among the men early Thursday evening. "Bulala lez'inja," they said. "Kill the dogs. " No one else seemed to notice that anything was wrong, Masigo said at a hospital news conference yesterday morning.
NEWS
January 15, 1986 | By TOM SCHMIDT, Daily News Staff Writer
Bishop Desmond Tutu, considered the moral voice of blacks in South Africa, is a voice with humor and courage. "Missionaries came to South Africa," goes one of the stories Tutu tells. "We had the land and they had the Bible. Then they said, 'Let us pray,' and we closed our eyes. When we opened them again, they had the land and we had the Bible. Maybe we got the better end of the deal. " As Tutu leads the civil rights struggle against white rule in South Africa, the stories accumulate.
NEWS
June 29, 1994 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
PAIR LOSE THEIR WAY IN LAND OF MIDNIGHT SUN Call it the fishing trip that got away. Seems a 72-year-old Swede and his 16-year-old grandson got lost on the drive home from a fishing trip and ended up 900 miles from home deep in the Arctic Circle. Police in Kirkenes, a Norwegian town bordering Russia, said the man was being treated at a local hospital for exhaustion after driving for three days without stopping - in the wrong direction. The pair had set off from central Sweden last week for a trip to the inland lakes region of Jamtland, about 60 miles away.
NEWS
March 30, 1994 | BY JACK McKINNEY
As talking heads go, Nightline's Ted Koppel is a hard-working guy who surely deserves an occasional night off to give the old larynx a rest. It was just ABC-TV's luck that he'd chosen to take off Monday night, before it became obvious that "Nightline" would have to do a quick follow-up on the gunbattles that broke out when Zulus loyal to Mangosuthu Buthelezi marched on downtown Johannesburg to protest South Africa's imminent all-race elections....
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NEWS
July 1, 2013 | By Julie Pace, Associated Press
JOHANNESBURG - Paying tribute to his personal hero, President Obama met privately Saturday with Nelson Mandela's family. Obama, who has spoken movingly about the ailing 94-year-old antiapartheid leader throughout his trip to Africa, praised the former South African president's "moral courage" during remarks from the grand Union Buildings where Mandela was inaugurated as his nation's first black president. Obama also called on the continent's leaders, including in neighboring Zimbabwe, to take stock of Mandela's willingness to put country before self and step down after one term despite his immense popularity.
NEWS
August 12, 2012
Heidi Holland, 64, a journalist and author who chronicled the rise of Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe from freedom fighter to power-obsessed leader, died Saturday at her home in South Africa, police said. Lt. Col. Katlego Mogale said a gardener found Ms. Holland's body in her home in Melville, a suburb of Johannesburg after an apparent suicide. Mogale said there were no signs of foul play, nor any items missing from her home to suggest a burglary. Ms. Holland grew up in Zimbabwe, then white-controlled Rhodesia, but described in her 2008 book, Dinner With Mugabe , her sympathy for the future president and others fighting to turn control of the nation back to black Africans.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
IN THE OPENING moments of "Safe House," rogue agent Denzel Washington endures bullets and waterboarding with the air of a man getting a spa treatment. He's relaxed and cool, and the audience laughs, because Washington wears his movie star history/charisma like armor. He wants his star stature to blend with his character - Tobin Frost, a celebrity in the CIA for having built its modern spy machine before he mysteriously went AWOL. Now Frost is back, and in possession of sensitive data that many intelligence agencies will kill to suppress.
SPORTS
June 22, 2010
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Two weeks ago, Johannesburg was on fire for Bafana Bafana. South Africa's national team was, no doubt, a team of destiny, and as you drove around the city, there were rolling flags, horns honking, and jerseys everywhere. But after last week's 3-0 loss to Uruguay, the country endured a time of mourning as it figured out how to continue supporting Bafana Bafana-as well as the rest of the World Cup. The hotel service staff went from wearing its gold-and-yellow Adidas jerseys to returning to its standard uniform dress of gray and white.
SPORTS
June 17, 2010
PRETORIA, South Africa - Join the voice behind Bafana Bafana. These are the life-size words posted throughout Johannesburg, the billboards as frequent as mile markers, displayed on side roads such as Rivonia and highways such as the N1. And so, on a chilly Wednesday evening, joining the voice in its quest against Uruguay seemed right, even natural. An opening-game tie with Mexico had offered South Africa continued hope, had offered the host nation a second chance for victory and, with that victory, a likely pass out of group play and into the knockout stages.
SPORTS
June 12, 2010
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - South Africa made like the Big Apple and didn't sleep on Thursday night. The anticipation for Africa's first World Cup had been evident all week: parades, colors, headlines, billboards and happiness. But on Thursday night, the city reached a crescendo with the FIFA World Cup Kick-Off Celebration Concert. Performing at the concert were the Black Eyed Peas, Alicia Keys, John Legend, and Shakira. Around 30,000 fans danced for hours. Outside on the streets, the party continued until morning with vuvuzelas blowing from car windows; it was then that it seemed all of Johannesburg streamed toward Soccer City.
SPORTS
June 11, 2010 | By Kate Fagan, Inquirer Staff Writer
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - The colors of Bafana Bafana, the affectionate nickname bestowed upon South Africa's national team, are lime green and lemon yellow. And the colors are everywhere. On billboards, attached to rearview mirrors, worn in jersey form by nearly everyone working in the service industry, worn by those simply excited for this event, and worn by "The Boys" themselves, who on Friday will kick off the 2010 FIFA World Cup by playing Mexico inside artistic Soccer City, the tournament's marquee venue that holds 88,460 and is located a few winding kilometers from downtown Johannesburg.
SPORTS
June 7, 2010 | By Kate Fagan, Inquirer Staff Writer
PRETORIA, South Africa - While overzealous fans were creating news, and injuries, in a suburb outside Johannesburg, the U.S. men's national team held an open practice, welcoming a small collection of fans as well as hundreds of local children. On Sunday afternoon, before an exhibition match between Nigeria and North Korea, approximately 15 people were injured in a stampede outside of Makhulong Stadium, located in the Johannesburg suburb of Tembisa. In the last few days, many teams have staged warm-up matches in preparation for the FIFA World Cup, which runs from Friday to July 11. In a similar exhibition match on Saturday, also in a Johannesburg suburb, the U.S. team defeated Australia, 3-1, with all 7,000 fans entering and exiting the stadium without incident.
SPORTS
June 4, 2010 | By Kate Fagan, Inquirer Staff Writer
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Goalkeepers seem to enjoy a new soccer ball about as much as they enjoy defending a penalty kick. A new ball is always too light, too unpredictable, the wrong color, and what was the problem with the old one, anyway? This summer's latest edition - the Jabulani, created by Adidas for the 2010 FIFA World Cup - has recently been called all sorts of bad names by the stars preparing to use it. The most contemptuous review came from Brazilian goalkeeper Julio Cesar, who told the press: "It's terrible, horrible.
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