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John Bartram

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NEWS
April 18, 1993 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After more than 200 years, John Bartram is going to have his name cleared. In a ceremony on June 27, Bartram, a Colonial botanist, naturalist and founder of Philadelphia's Bartram Gardens, will be reinstated as a member in good standing of the Darby Friends Meeting. From that day, Bartram will no longer be branded a heretic. The ceremony will be a highlight of a three-day family reunion held that weekend. Bartram, who lived in Collingdale, had been "read out" or disowned by the Quakers on Feb. 1, 1758.
NEWS
June 28, 1993 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In a ceremony befitting the Quaker tradition - without frills, fanfares or folderol - John Bartram, colonial botanist, naturalist and founder of Philadelphia's Bartram Gardens, was "read" back in as a member of the Darby Friends Meeting after the regular 11 a.m. worship service yesterday. The ceremony was the crowning touch for a three-day Bartram family reunion in Philadelphia, at which more than 300 members of the Bartram family, representing 15 states, celebrated the 100th anniversary of the Bartram Family Association.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Bartram was known for the wooden boxes he filled with botanical goodies from the New World and shipped off to wealthy customers in England and beyond. Though long gone from marketplace and memory, those utilitarian boxes and their quirky contents - plants, seeds, and "curiosities" such as birds' nests and live turtles - supported the 18th-century botanist's influential research and plant nursery. Now, they serve as artistic inspiration for an unusual exhibition called Bartram's Boxes Remix , a collaboration between Bartram's Garden in Southwest Philadelphia and the Center for Art in Wood in Old City.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1999 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Postal Service is helping to brighten letters with five commemoratives featuring flowers. The stamps will help publicize botanical gardens. A 33-cent stamp was issued Tuesday honoring botanists John Bartram and his son William for their efforts in establishing the nation's oldest botanical gardens, at 54th Street and Lindbergh Boulevard in Southwest Philadelphia. The stamp depicts the Franklinia alatamaha, the Bartrams' most famous discovery, named for their friend Benjamin Franklin.
SPORTS
March 8, 2003 | By Todd Zolecki INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If Lou Biester had to choose a model, he knew he had to pick Simon Gratz. A no-brainer, right? For years, Gratz has been the most consistent and dominating team in Public League boys' basketball. The Bulldogs have not only won their share of Public League titles, but they won a mythical national championship in 1991. So Biester, John Bartram's coach since the 1999-2000 season, meant what he told former Gratz coach Bill Ellerbee two years ago when the Bulldogs played their best game of the season and handed Bartram a 69-39 loss in the semifinals.
NEWS
August 21, 1998 | By Morris Thompson
I went down to Bartram's Garden on the glorious afternoon that was yesterday. I had a possible column in mind about the delights of public gardens in Philadelphia and around the Delaware Valley, a light paean to summer diversion on an August day. I came back with more complex musings about where we have come from as a city and how, in figuring out where our economy is going, we're under-utilizing opportunities for tourism from near and far. Bartram's Garden,...
SPORTS
February 5, 2013 | BY TED SILARY, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News Staff Writer silaryt@phillynews.com
Bartram under scrutiny for extra game   THE PIAA allows its basketball teams to play 22 teams, not counting playoffs. The Public League begins postseason action Tuesday and John Bartram's record is 11-12. Hmmmm . . . Bartram traveled to Williamsport for game No. 23, which was played Saturday. The result, a 71-58 win for Williamsport, was not reported to the service that provides box scores/info to the Daily News and Inquirer, and that town's local paper listed Bartram's postgame record as 11-11 in the next day's edition.
NEWS
June 21, 1993 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
Back when Philadelphia was an infant colony he planted thousands of trees and shrubs and fathered 11 children. The flora and family planted by John Bartram 250 years ago continues to bear fruit. This weekend, about 300 Bartram descendants from 14 states will gather at the solid stone farmhouse the famed botanist built with his own hands and under trees he planted on the west bank of the Schuylkill River. The family reunion marks 100 years since Bartram's descendants organized The John Bartram Association to protect and preserve one of the nation's great historic sites, Bartram's Garden.
NEWS
January 13, 1986 | By Laura Quinn, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Young, one of Philadelphia's first botanists, collected material for his book on native North American plants by peering over the garden wall of his rival, John Bartram. Young's action represents one of the darker moments in the history of horticulture in Philadelphia. Young, who published his book in Paris in 1783, was willing to go to extraordinary lengths to become the first man to introduce exotic American plants to European connoisseurs. "He was no humble man and was rather sneaky," said James Mears, a former head of botany for the Academy of Natural Sciences and the curator of a new exhibit on the city's horticulture.
NEWS
May 23, 2001 | By Cynthia Burton INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The state Department of Environmental Protection has denied a permit for a construction- and demolition-debris transfer station near Historic Bartram's Garden in Kingsessing, plans that residents and garden advocates have fought for almost two years. The DEP denied Philadelphia Waste Services a permit to use a corrugated-metal building at 1620 S. 49th St. as a recycling center for debris from construction and demolition. The state rejected the application because it would operate within 300 yards of a park: Historic Bartram's Garden.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia and the poinsettia go back almost 200 years, but the relationship has never been exclusive. It involves a raft of iconic names and institutions in this city's lengthy horticultural history: Bartram's Garden, Col. Robert Carr, Robert Buist Sr., J. Liddon Pennock Jr., and the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. PHS has mounted a small exhibition showcasing the popular "Christmas plant," in all its local connectivity, through Dec. 19 in the society's newly refurbished library.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Bartram was known for the wooden boxes he filled with botanical goodies from the New World and shipped off to wealthy customers in England and beyond. Though long gone from marketplace and memory, those utilitarian boxes and their quirky contents - plants, seeds, and "curiosities" such as birds' nests and live turtles - supported the 18th-century botanist's influential research and plant nursery. Now, they serve as artistic inspiration for an unusual exhibition called Bartram's Boxes Remix , a collaboration between Bartram's Garden in Southwest Philadelphia and the Center for Art in Wood in Old City.
SPORTS
November 3, 2013 | BY AARON CARTER, Daily News Staff Writer cartera@phillynews.com
A SMALL BUS brimming with the John Bartram football team pulled into Abraham Lincoln at 2:50 p.m. for a 3 p.m. non-league kickoff. After Bartram's bus arrived in Southwest Philadelphia 50 minutes late, traffic made the cross-city trip unbearable, and the players were in desperate need of some relief. Upon exiting the vehicle at Lincoln, nearly a dozen Bartram players headed for the bushes atop a hill behind the visitor's sideline to find said relief. "That bus ride was, like, an hour," Bartram junior Makai Sheed said with a sheepish grin.
NEWS
April 16, 2013 | By Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Philadelphia's Hidden River is going to become a lot easier to see starting on Mother's Day, when boat tours return to the Schuylkill. The cruises, run by a company new to the river, Patriot Harbor Lines, begin May 12 and will leave from 24th and Walnut Streets for three-hour cruises that include a two-hour stop at Bartram's Garden, the historic jewel in Southwest Philadelphia. Tickets are $30, which includes the $10 admission to visit the home of famed naturalist John Bartram.
SPORTS
February 5, 2013 | BY TED SILARY, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News Staff Writer silaryt@phillynews.com
Bartram under scrutiny for extra game   THE PIAA allows its basketball teams to play 22 teams, not counting playoffs. The Public League begins postseason action Tuesday and John Bartram's record is 11-12. Hmmmm . . . Bartram traveled to Williamsport for game No. 23, which was played Saturday. The result, a 71-58 win for Williamsport, was not reported to the service that provides box scores/info to the Daily News and Inquirer, and that town's local paper listed Bartram's postgame record as 11-11 in the next day's edition.
SPORTS
February 1, 2013 | BY TED SILARY, Daily News Staff Writer silaryt@phillynews.com
HAKEEM BAXTER is the classic South Philly guard. Aside from being quick, strong, aggressive and versatile, the 6-1, 180-pound senior wing is the kind of player who'd cut out your heart and then enjoy stomping on it. One "problem" with this setup . . . Baxter doesn't live in South Philly. He hails from North Philly, on Woodstock Street near 20th and Diamond, and if he were not attending Philadelphia Electrical & Technology Charter, which is located in Center City and plays its basketball games near 2nd and Moore, in South Philly, his school would be Roberts Vaux.
SPORTS
October 15, 2012 | BY TED SILARY, Daily News Staff Writer
PUBLIC LEAGUE football has experienced the worst kind of replay - a game-ending brawl. Messy incident No. 1 occurred Oct. 5, when visiting Southern's 32-8 Public League Class AAAA Silver win over Olney Charter was halted with 7:50 remaining in the fourth quarter. Take Two took place Saturday at Gratz' Marcus Foster Memorial Stadium, as Overbrook met John Bartram in a AAA game. This disturbing blowup happened with 2:05 left in the third quarter and referee Tom McClain, following Bill Hall's lead at Olney, sent everyone home.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2012
Top Regional Attractions Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University 1900 Benjamin Franklin Pkwy.; 215-299-1000. www.ansp.org . The Academy at 200: The Nature of Discovery. Birds of a Feather Behind the Scenes Tour. $7.50. $15; $13 seniors, students, military, children 3-12; free for children under 3. 10 am-4:30 pm Mon.-Fri., 10 am-5 pm Sat.-Sun.. African American Museum 701 Arch St.; 215-574-0380. www.aampmuseum.org . $10; $8 seniors, students and children.
SPORTS
March 12, 2012 | BY TED SILARY, Daily News Staff Writer
GERALD EVARISTE is well familiar with overcoming basketball disappointment. After all, he missed his entire sophomore season. So, on Saturday at Southern High, after his first attempt at giving John Bartram a late-game lead in the first round of the PIAA Class AAAA state playoffs did not quite go fabulously, did you think he was going to shrink or vanish? No way! Evariste is a 6-5, 195-pound junior center and his second-chance bucket with 14 seconds remaining enabled the Braves to edge Central Dauphin East, 48-47.
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