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John Bolton

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NEWS
June 7, 2005
Ohio Republican Sen. George Voinovich's assessment of John Bolton to become the next U.S. ambassador to the United Nations not only was heartfelt, it contained a message Voinovich's Senate colleagues would do well to heed: "The United States can do better than John Bolton," he told senators. The vote on Bolton, President Bush's choice for the U.N. post, could come this week now that the Senate is back from its Memorial Day break. The United States must do better than John Bolton if it wants to improve its national security, reform the United Nations, and find allies to fight against terrorism.
NEWS
April 6, 2005 | By Trudy Rubin
John Bolton, a man who loathes the United Nations, is up for confirmation as the new U.S. ambassador to - the United Nations. The Senate Foreign Relations Committee will hold hearings this week; chances are good it will approve Bolton by a party-line vote. But the hearings are unlikely to resolve the main question raised by this strange nomination: What does the President want this man to do? Administration sources are whispering that this is a "Nixon to China" appointment, sending a harsh critic to clean out the glass house on the Hudson.
NEWS
August 2, 2005
There's something sadly fitting about President Bush naming John Bolton as the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations through a tactic known as a "recess" appointment. Bolton, after all, is the diplomatic world's equivalent of a playground bully. Ignoring warning signs about Bolton's temperamental and ideological suitability for this post, issues that had held up a Senate confirmation vote, Bush used his power to name people to posts while the Senate is in recess. It was a slap at the thoughtful senators on both sides of the aisle, including Democrat Joseph Biden of Delaware and Republican George Voinovich of Ohio, who had sought more information on Bolton's past deeds from a stonewalling White House.
NEWS
July 2, 2005
John Bolton is the wrong man to become the next U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. President Bush would do the nation no good by appointing him to that key diplomatic post during the Fourth of July legislative break. The President clearly has the authority to make a recess appointment. Article 2, section 2, clause 3 of the Constitution gives him that power: "The President shall have the Power to fill up all Vacancies that may happen during the Recess of the Senate, by granting Commissions which shall expire at the End of their next Session.
NEWS
March 10, 2005
John Bolton is the wrong person to serve as the United States' representative to the United Nations. The Senate should reject President Bush's nomination of him. The choice of Bolton, previously undersecretary of state for arms control and international security, to succeed John Danforth is bewildering. Bush started his second term in the Oval Office by seeking improved cooperation with European allies who split with Washington over the war in Iraq. That effort signaled a welcome realization that a broad array of allies is a plus for U.S. foreign policy, and that the U.N., while deeply in need of reform, can still play a constructive role in some global challenges.
NEWS
April 11, 2005 | By William Douglas INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Growing up in the 1960s, John R. Bolton often debated with his high school history teacher over the dangers of America's going soft on communism and giving up in Vietnam, honing a blunt, hard-line style that would later become his trademark. "He'd say 'How can you let 2,000 men die there in vain?' " recalled Marty McKibbin, Bolton's teacher at the McDonogh School, then a private military academy in Baltimore. "The next year he'd come back and say, 'How can you let 4,000 men die in vain?
NEWS
April 12, 2005 | By Peter Brooks
The fireworks started yesterday. Sen. Dick Lugar's Foreign Relations Committee began three days of what promised to be grueling, partisan hearings on President Bush's nomination of John Bolton to be America's ambassador to the United Nations. The knock on Bolton is that he's supposedly "anti-U.N. " In fact, his criticisms have always been inspired by the U.N.'s ideals - and therefore scathing about its corrupt reality. The United Nations is a mess, rocked by scandals and failure.
NEWS
May 31, 2005
TO THE DISMAY of Republicans, Senate Democrats last week succeeded in keeping John Bolton's nomination to be UN Ambassador in limbo. They return today in hopes of finally getting an up or down vote. But they should rethink that. With some notable defections from his own party, including Senators George Voinovich and John Thune, President Bush is sending to the United Nations a man that has divided even his own party. Some diplomat.
NEWS
August 2, 2005
LOOK AT it this way: If President Bush had done the right thing and withdrawn the nomination of "serial abuser" John Bolton to be U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, it would have been only to replace him with someone less overtly "a quintessential kiss-up, kick-down sort of guy. " But the Bush administration's misguided and dishonest policies would have remained the same. This way, the policies won't have the "cover" provided by a sane-appearing U.N. ambassador like Bolton's predecessor, John Danforth.
NEWS
March 9, 2005
FOR A GUY who was once undersecretary of state for arms control, John Bolton sure likes to throw bombs. He once said, "There is no such thing as the United Nations. If the U.N. Secretariat Building in New York lost 10 stories, it wouldn't make a bit of difference. " He also is no fan of international law: "It is a big mistake for us to grant any validity to international law even when it may seem in our short-term interest to do so-because, over the long term, the goal of those who think that international law really means anything are those who want to constrain the United States.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 1, 2013 | By Craig Snyder
On the airwaves, in the streets, and on social media sites, the world is filled with the noise of nasty discourse. We are assaulted by bitter diatribes that rarely prompt anyone to consider content, much less change opinions. Our country stands to lose the ability to civilly exchange divergent opinions. I have recently returned to Philadelphia as president and CEO of the World Affairs Council, where I started my first job out of college 30 years ago. Now, as then, the mission of the council is strictly nonpartisan.
NEWS
October 28, 2012 | By Kevin Ferris, Inquirer Columnist
For those who didn't hear enough about foreign policy Monday, John Bolton was in Philadelphia the next day to continue the conversation. Not surprisingly, the former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, who endorsed Mitt Romney early in the primary process, told his audience at the National Museum of American Jewish History that the GOP nominee "finished up the debate season last night with an outstanding performance. " "Most people think the economy is the big issue, but I do think everybody wants to have checked in their mental checklist that this guy can be president during an international crisis, and that is an absolute prerequisite to making a responsible choice on Election Day," Bolton said in an interview after his talk.
NEWS
January 28, 2011 | By WILL BUNCH, bunchw@phillynews.com 215-854-2957
If budget-cutting is the new mantra in Washington, then John Bolton - the former Bush administration stalwart now weighing a 2012 presidential bid - didn't get the part of the memo that deals with defense spending. In Philadelphia to address a new conservative foreign-policy outfit, Bolton acknowledged that there's "waste and fraud" in the Pentagon, but added: "If it comes to actual major cuts, that would be a huge mistake for the United States to make. " While others see the world's largest military - by far - as ripe for reform, Bolton argued during an interview at the Union League that the Department of Defense needs to be doing more.
NEWS
December 7, 2006 | By Claudia Rosett
John Bolton's resignation this week as ambassador to the United Nations was hardly the result of his being - as some have charged - ineffective, or a bully, or abrasive. The real problem is the shrunken character of the U.N. Bolton was a Gulliver dispatched to Lilliput, a truth-teller in a den of diplomats. As a principled man in a dishonest institution, he was a threat to a whole raft of special interests that feed off the U.N. system. If anything, Bolton was polite in a setting where bullying and abrading hardly count as sins.
NEWS
December 5, 2006
Diplomacy has never been the strong suit of President Bush's administration. No wonder the Senate balked last year at confirming cantankerous John Bolton as United Nations ambassador, leading to his recess appointment by Bush. Bolton turned in his resignation yesterday after it became clear that the Senate Foreign Relations Committee would not approve returning him to his post. His 16-month term, shortened because the Senate had not confirmed him, expires at the end of December.
NEWS
August 2, 2006
The United States needs the United Nations. The question is whether the United States needs John Bolton as its advocate at the U.N. If Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice really has persuaded President Bush to emphasize diplomacy over unilateralism, then the answer to that question is no. It was a year ago this month that Bush used his executive power to circumvent a contentious Senate confirmation process and name Bolton as his U.N. representative....
NEWS
April 21, 2006 | By Carolyn Davis
Dear Ambassador Bolton: Welcome to Philadelphia. I know your time is valuable, so let me get into business right away. It's about a matter that has waited and waited and waited. It should linger no longer. The U.N. Security Council has a very real chance to end the 20-year war between a rebel group known as the Lord's Resistance Army and the government of President Yoweri Museveni in northern Uganda. As wars too often do, it has killed thousands, emptied communities, sundered families.
NEWS
March 19, 2006
At the onset of the war in Iraq, Americans were anxious but supportive of President Bush sending the U.S. military to the Persian Gulf to topple the dangerous regime of Saddam Hussein. That invasion began three years ago today. A March 2003 poll from the Program on International Policy Studies showed 66 percent of Americans favored invading Iraq; 32 percent opposed it. No close call there. In 2006, it is clear that Bush's war has done one good thing: rid Iraq of Hussein, who terrorized his own people and threatened neighboring nations.
NEWS
September 4, 2005
We need John Bolton Your Aug. 31 editorial on John Bolton ("Mr. Bolton charges in") was very disingenuous. While you clearly state that "U.N. priorities do not mimic U.S. priorities," you seem to overlook that very fact. That is exactly why we need someone like John Bolton to go in there and reform things. The United Nations has become little more than a forum for bashing America. When countries such as Libya, Cuba and Sudan are on the U.N. Human Rights Commission, great changes are needed.
NEWS
August 16, 2005
WHAT'S with the hatred, Editorial Board? Since John Kerry didn't win the last election, the current president gets to put in his choices to carry out his agenda. President Bush put the right man in to straighten out the mess the U.N. has become. The U.N. is currently full of crooks and thugs led by Kofi Annan. It seems to me a no-nonsense ambassador like John Bolton would be the right prescription for a laggard world organization such as the U.N. has become. The recess appointment doesn't have to fool anybody.
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