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John Chaney

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NEWS
March 20, 2001 | By Acel Moore
I am a fan of Temple University's basketball team and its legendary coach, John Chaney, not because I went to Temple. I did not. Not because my son is a Temple alum. He is. I am a fan not just because I am a native Philadelphian. And not just because I brought a partial season packet this year to see Temple basketball. I am a Temple basketball fan out of respect and admiration for John Chaney because of who he is and where he came from. Chaney, like me, is a South Philadelphian.
SPORTS
February 27, 1990 | By M.G. Missanelli, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Temple's losses have added up, John Chaney's luster has dimmed. He has the well-worn look of a man who has toiled perhaps a little too long on the front line. His temples are a little grayer, his face a little more drawn. Just two years ago, Chaney was being lauded as one of the greatest coaches in college basketball. He was named national coach of the year after guiding the Owls to a 32-2 record, a No. 1 ranking for most of the season, and an appearance in the NCAA East Regional final.
NEWS
January 30, 2004
When greatness lingers for a long time, it can get taken for granted. At the Liacouras Center Wednesday night, the stands were half-empty. There were reasons: It was a cold night. The Temple Owls basketball team is having a middling year. The opponent was unexciting. Yet something huge happened, marked by 700 balloons drifting down from the rafters as the band played. John Chaney, the raspy-voice original from North Broad Street, won his 700th game as a college basketball coach, the 16th Division I-A coach to do so, the first African American.
NEWS
February 23, 2012 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, zalotm@phillynews.com 215-854-5928
LOCAL HOOPS legend Alonzo Lewis, who died Tuesday night after being hit by a car, still owes old friend John Chaney milk from the days they would bet bottles of it on one-on-one pickup games at the Palestra. "I wanted to play for sodas; he wanted to play for milk. He was a health nut, you know, always believed in being conditioned," Chaney, the longtime Temple coach, who played with Lewis for nearly a decade in the old Eastern League, recalled fondly last night. Just as the former teammates would tease each other about who was the better player whenever they met, Chaney joked through his sadness last night: "I would say, after playing him on the court for so many years, that he still owes me some milk, 'cause I won. " Lewis, 77, a star at La Salle University, was the third-winningest coach in Chester High School's history, with a 237-67 record from 1985 to 1995, including the state championship in '89. He later coached at Cheyney University.
NEWS
March 17, 2000 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
Love him or loathe him, John Chaney is ours. Like Rocky in tattered sweats or fattening cheesesteaks with extra Whiz, the coach of the Temple University men's basketball team is a local gem - slightly tarnished with very human faults - who, somehow, became a Philadelphia institution. And now, under the glow of a national media spotlight that shines on his team (a favorite in the NCAA tournament that started yesterday), his legend will only grow. Cantankerous, outspoken and earnest, he increasingly defines our city - both on the banks of the Delaware and throughout the rest of America.
NEWS
July 26, 1992 | By Mac Daniel, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It was a classic half-court breakaway, and Anthony Gilbert had his 15-year- old mind made up. He was going to the basket from about 20 feet out. And there was nothing to stop him except - ahem! A girl. He drove, dribbling hard, taking long strides. He envisioned a 360-degree- tongue-out-behind-the-back-screaming-slam-dunk. The image was glorious - until something unexpected happened. Instead of visions of Michael Jordan dancing through his head, the girl danced on his head.
SPORTS
January 7, 2016 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
The home team inside Penn State Brandywine's gym on Sunday afternoon went to a zone defense so the visiting coach called out an offensive play. Temple. Temple? Why is a coach from Division III North Carolina Wesleyan - from Rocky Mount, N.C. - calling a play Temple ? The answer goes back to the late 1980s, to John Chaney and his Temple Owls. "I was probably in my first year of coaching," said North Carolina Wesleyan coach John Thompson. (That's right, John Thompson.)
SPORTS
November 19, 2003 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If there is anything John Chaney prizes more than NCAA tournament appearances, it is toughness. Last season, Temple's coach failed to get the one, but saw enough of the other in his players after the Owls wandered around the country racking up early-season losses. "Easily, they could have died," Chaney said this week. "They ended up with 18 wins. But guess what? They could have just quit. They never quit. " The lessons start early at Temple. If one of his highly regarded freshmen happens to walk off the early-morning practice court this season with a bloody mouth, Chaney will tell him, "Forget the blood.
SPORTS
March 25, 2001 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The latest hero during Temple's most unlikely NCAA tournament run turns out to be a forward who didn't even play in Temple's first six games, a sophomore from Los Angeles who wasn't a walk-on, more like a walk-up. Greg Jefferson went after Temple. It wasn't the other way around. He even transferred to a Christian school in Philadelphia because he wanted to play for John Chaney. It was a good move. When former assistant Dean Demopoulos saw Jefferson in Conshohocken two years ago, he instantly recommended that the Owls offer him a scholarship.
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SPORTS
May 16, 2016 | By Mike Jensen, STAFF WRITER
Did it bother Bruce Arians, new to his job as Temple's head football coach in 1983, that Temple's president, Peter Liacouras, publicly expected Arians' Owls to make it to the Sugar Bowl in short order? It did not. "That's what I thought, too," Arians said over the phone Friday afternoon. "I wanted to work for someone who thought like that. It was fun to work for someone who dreamed the same way you did. " It took Arians three decades to achieve such heights, in his second head-coaching job - in the NFL, with the Arizona Cardinals - but he hasn't forgotten his first head-coaching stop, which is why Arians, just off a plane, returned a call back to Philadelphia.
SPORTS
March 19, 2016 | By Bob Brookover, Columnist
NEW YORK - Temple is the other Big Five school that will play here at the Barclay's Center in Brooklyn on Friday afternoon and it's probably fitting that the Owls will play after Villanova. The Wildcats, after all, did spend three weeks as the No. 1 team in the nation and have spent the last decade as the No. 1 college team in our area. For their part, the 10th-seeded Owls, unranked from start to finish this season, are happy to be here and eager to take on seventh-seeded Iowa. We know that because coach Fran Dunphy opened his media availability Thursday by telling us exactly that.
SPORTS
February 17, 2016 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, STAFF WRITER
One of the rivals Wednesday night, in what should be the raucous highlight of Philadelphia's college basketball season, is a large public institution that was founded by a Baptist minister. Its campus, veined by subway lines and narrow streets, sprawls across the redbrick heart of gritty North Philadelphia. The other is a much smaller Catholic school that occupies a leafy slice of Main Line real estate. It has only a third as many students as its urban adversary and is twice as costly to attend.
NEWS
February 17, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
JOHN CHANEY, the usually exuberant former Temple University basketball coach, was thoughtful and solemn. He was speaking about Acel Moore. "I can only say that I have been a great friend of his for so many years," Chaney said of Moore. "He was one of the very few members of the press that I found that I could truly love and care for. He was somebody very special. " Moore, 75, a retired Inquirer columnist and editor and a trailblazer who pushed to increase diversity in newsrooms, died Friday.
SPORTS
February 16, 2016 | By Mike Kern, STAFF WRITER
MARK MACON scored more points (2,609) than all but two players in Big 5 history: Lionel Simmons (3,217) and Michael Brooks (2,628). He's the only man who played basketball for Temple since 1958 to have his number retired. In his college farewell he had 31 on 12-for-23 shooting to go with nine rebounds as 10th-seeded Temple lost to top seed North Carolina, 75-72, at the Meadowlands in the East Regional final. His 30-footer at the buzzer hit off the front of the rim. I asked UNC's Rick Fox what he was thinking when that shot was in the air. Without hesitation he replied, "I thought it was going in, because it seemed like everything else he put up did. " Later, at the podium, coach John Chaney got emotional talking about how he wanted to get to the Final Four "for Mark," when of course everybody else wanted to get there for Chaney.
SPORTS
February 16, 2016 | By Marc Narducci, STAFF WRITER
Mark Macon made a career out of having big games and even bigger wins at Temple. In his four basketball seasons, Macon led the Owls to three NCAA appearances, including twice in the Elite Eight. Yet it was his final game, which ended in defeat, that Macon is often remembered for the most, when he distinguished himself against one of the NCAA's true heavyweights. Macon, his former coach John Chaney and a number of teammates from Temple's 1991 squad returned Sunday for a 25th anniversary celebration.
SPORTS
January 28, 2016 | By Mike Kern, Daily News Columnist
IT'S TIME. Time to do the right thing. For a most deserving guy, for all the obvious reasons. From 1982-2006, John Chaney went 516-253 at Temple. It's the most wins by any coach in Big 5 history. But not for much longer. Soon, the record will belong to Chaney's successor on North Broad. Now in his 10th season, Fran Dunphy is 204-115 with the Owls. After going 310-163 at Penn. Which means that he's three victories away from passing a legend. And even at 67, it's like not he's retiring tomorrow.
SPORTS
January 7, 2016 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
The home team inside Penn State Brandywine's gym on Sunday afternoon went to a zone defense so the visiting coach called out an offensive play. Temple. Temple? Why is a coach from Division III North Carolina Wesleyan - from Rocky Mount, N.C. - calling a play Temple ? The answer goes back to the late 1980s, to John Chaney and his Temple Owls. "I was probably in my first year of coaching," said North Carolina Wesleyan coach John Thompson. (That's right, John Thompson.)
NEWS
November 7, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
I once spent a day with Widener University basketball coach C. Alan Rowe, which meant going to class. Even at age 63, Rowe was teaching five Widener math courses a semester. He seemed to know all the names of his students without a seating chart. His first words to one calculus class: "Your hats, gentlemen. " This was 1994. This man was delightfully old school. Rowe never complimented his players - like ever, even his favorites. He simply drilled them in the principles that he held dear.
SPORTS
September 15, 2015 | By Dick Jerardi, Daily News Columnist
I HAD TICKETS for Game 5 of the 1983 NBA Finals at the Spectrum. It was just before I got into the writing business full-time and nine years after I was supposed to see Moses Malone at Cole Field House. Caesar Alsop, my great friend from the University of Maryland who would become the Daily News sports editor, had been telling me stories about how this Moses was going to take the Terps to the Promised Land. C-Man grew up in Virginia and knew all about the man-child from his home state.
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