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John Coltrane

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NEWS
June 20, 1992 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
More than one jazz historian has commented that watching the late tenor saxophone master John Coltrane perform was like participating in a highly spiritual church service. Thursday at the Academy of Music, in a three-hour Mellon PSFS Jazz Festival tribute that featured many of Coltrane's associates, just about every solo drew a few "amens. " All were deserved. It wasn't that pianist McCoy Tyner's trio, drummer Elvin Jones' Jazz Machine - which featured Coltrane's youngest son, Ravi, on tenor and soprano - or tenor saxophonist Charles Lloyd attempted to replicate Coltrane's flurrying, sometimes furious patterns.
NEWS
May 16, 2005 | By Kevin L. Carter FOR THE INQUIRER
Ravi Coltrane's introductory notes to his father's standard ballad "Naima" illustrated the stylistic existential dilemma he has faced since he first picked up a saxophone. The 39-year-old tenorist has spent most of his professional life trying not to be like John Coltrane. And his soft, light introduction, which evolved quickly into filigreed wrought iron - pretty but strong - asserted his independence. But the theme Saturday night at the Kimmel Center's Perelman Theater - explorations of John Coltrane's music in Latin contexts, in the fifth and last of the "Take the Col'train" series - also illustrated that anyone who plays saxophone, or Coltrane's music on any horn, has to contend with his long, bright shadow.
NEWS
March 15, 2013 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
NORMAN GADSON bought John Coltrane's old house in Strawberry Mansion in 2004 from Mary "Cousin Mary" Alexander, a relative of the jazz saxophonist. Not long after, he'd call up musicians in the city and ask them to come over to jam in 'Trane's house. Lenora Early, Gadson's widow, said her husband, a fervent jazz fan, intended to fix up the house and open it as a jazz venue. "He just loved jazz," Early said of Gadson. But he died in 2007, before he could restore the house, on 33rd Street near Oxford.
NEWS
March 4, 2003 | By Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is a house where music took giant steps, where saxophonist John Coltrane, an icon of modern jazz, composed works in the 1950s that still amaze and inspire. Yet, little by little, this historic North Philadelphia rowhouse, sandwiched by two vacant houses, is sliding into disrepair. Outside, a plaque installed by the National Park Service in 1999 reads: "In this place John Coltrane, African American jazz innovator, composed music for his first recordings in the 1950s. Through his musical genius and significant contribution to American music, Coltrane wrote his own epitaph.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1992 | By Francis Davis, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
"John Coltrane practiced all the time," said Jimmy Oliver, the diminutive, soft-spoken tenor saxophonist who has been a mainstay of the Philadelphia jazz scene since the 1940s. "All the time," repeated Oliver as the other musicians in the living room nodded in assent. "Something I can't ever seem to do. On the road, OK. But at home, I get a little lax. Not Coltrane - he was a little more than dedicated. "When you say the name Coltrane, you think about music, not what he may have done in his daily life," said Oliver of the legendary saxophonist, to whom the Mellon PSFS Jazz Festival, which runs Thursday through June 21, is dedicated.
NEWS
June 24, 1993 | By Alissa Wolf, FOR THE INQUIRER
The warm, mellow sounds of the Michael Pedicin Quartet, mouth-watering Cal- Italian edibles and a bright, cozy atmosphere are what you'll get if you venture to Girasole Ristorante in Atlantic City on Friday and Saturday nights. When the restaurant opened at the Ocean Club Condominiums last year on the heels of its successful Philly outlet, it became an instant hit among upscale folks who otherwise might not have ventured to the honky-tonk casino town. And now, in addition to its excellent brick-oven pizzas, pasta dishes, sandwiches and salads, Girasole has some tasty jazz on its menu.
NEWS
August 20, 2001
JAZZ STARS today just don't play sax the way John Coltrane did. A mural in his honor would be an inspiration to any neighborhood. It teaches children their black culture. I'm trying to get a mural put up next to a vacant lot. I would be more than glad to have his mural here. Dorothy L. Banner, Philadelphia
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1999 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When pianist Alice Coltrane and her saxophonist sons Ravi and Oran played together in the middle of Tuesday night's "Africa Brass" concert at the First Unitarian Church, something magical happened. The magic wasn't necessarily a function of the family's music, though the Coltranes did occasionally approach transcendence during "O Bhagavan" and father John Coltrane's "Crescent. " It was more the beginning of a coming of age for the younger son, Oran, an altoist with a heretofore much lower profile than his mother and brother.
NEWS
June 19, 1998 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
The John W. Coltrane Cultural Society opens its summer backyard concert series tomorrow with the Odean Pope Trio. The series is staged behind 1511 N. 33rd St. in Strawberry Mansion, the house where the great tenor saxophonist John Coltrane lived. This year, the series has received a corporate boost from Seagram Americas, which also contributed $10,000 to renovate the house next door into a Coltrane cultural center and headquarters for the society. Seagram Americas will also sponsor the society's Coltrane birthday celebration in September.
NEWS
October 9, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saxophonist Steve Coleman swore that he was so far under the underground that few outside his community of fellow performers appreciated his idiosyncratic approach to music. For the Allentown horn player who could be inspired by circulatory systems and bird calls, no sound is off-limits. But evidently, someone has been listening. Last month, Coleman was roused out of bed by a phone call from the MacArthur Foundation. He had won what is known as a "genius grant," a $650,000 prize awarded over five years.
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NEWS
October 9, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saxophonist Steve Coleman swore that he was so far under the underground that few outside his community of fellow performers appreciated his idiosyncratic approach to music. For the Allentown horn player who could be inspired by circulatory systems and bird calls, no sound is off-limits. But evidently, someone has been listening. Last month, Coleman was roused out of bed by a phone call from the MacArthur Foundation. He had won what is known as a "genius grant," a $650,000 prize awarded over five years.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Tuesday, Sept. 23, would have been John Coltrane's 88th birthday. And there's a big Coltrane panel Tuesday at Temple University. Resonance Records will be there, along with Temple people and the Ars Nova Workshop. But there's more than a birthday to celebrate. There's a just-released recording of a legendary Coltrane concert at Temple in 1966, eight months before his death. Resonance has just released Offering: Live at Temple University , a restored, often-bootlegged recording of the saxophone colossus and onetime Philly resident at his spiritual and improvisational peak.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2014 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
GIGANTIC dinosaur bones aren't the only things being dug up by Philadelphia archaeologists. A late-life recording by Philly-based saxophonist John Coltrane was recently discovered in the archives at Temple University by scholar Yasuhiro Fujioka, then dusted off for much-belated release by Resonance Records. And tomorrow at 5:30 p.m., on what would have been Coltrane's 88th birthday, the album will be debuted and discussed in a free-admission gab session at Temple's Paley Library, 1210 Polett Walk, sponsored by Ars Nova Workshop.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Since making her full-length album debut in 1993 with Plantation Lullabies , Meshell Ndegeocello has undergone more musical and lyrical changes than Cher has costumes. Gender- and genre-bending, she has ripped through ever-hazier shades of avant-pop and soul in her most recent albums, the salty jazz and decadent rock of 2012's Pour Une Âme Souveraine: A Dedication to Nina Simone , and the oddly layered dub/dance-hall pop of 2014's Comet, Come to Me . Does she even recognize the woman and the artist she started out as, considering all her changes?
NEWS
May 2, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Since his start in the late 1970s on the Los Angeles creative improvisational music scene, guitarist Nels Cline has moved among avant-garde jazz, noise rock, and crepuscular ambient sound. He may be best known for joining the alt-Americana ensemble Wilco in 2004. But his wide-ranging explorations continue, including Brazilian esoterica and dissonance with the CD Macroscope by the Nels Cline Singers. Cline has an especially close relationship with Mark Christman's Ars Nova Workshop (ANW)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2013 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
While John Coltrane's influence is pervasive in the last half-century of jazz history, only tenor saxophonist Pharoah Sanders could be considered a Coltrane apostle. Sanders was a member of the saxophonist's band during the last two years of Coltrane's life as he pushed into the furthest reaches of the avant-garde, and Sanders continued making his own music in a similar vein, combining explosive freedom and spiritual purpose. Leading a quartet at Montgomery County Community College on Saturday, the night before his 73d birthday, Sanders continued to carry the torch for his mentor, with more than half the set consisting of pieces composed by or associated with Coltrane.
NEWS
April 12, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IF YOU COULD make it at Spider Kelly's, you had already made it in the Philly jazz scene. After all, John Coltrane played there, as well as organist Jimmy Smith and numerous other local luminaries at a time ('50s and '60s) when Philadelphia was the place to be for the best in jazz. It was a tough crowd. A piano player kept a bottle of wine and a pistol under his piano. The denizens expected only the best in their kind of music, and they got it. The likes of Louis Jordan and Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis, playing at the nearby Earle Theatre, came by to scoop up talent for their bands.
NEWS
March 15, 2013 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
NORMAN GADSON bought John Coltrane's old house in Strawberry Mansion in 2004 from Mary "Cousin Mary" Alexander, a relative of the jazz saxophonist. Not long after, he'd call up musicians in the city and ask them to come over to jam in 'Trane's house. Lenora Early, Gadson's widow, said her husband, a fervent jazz fan, intended to fix up the house and open it as a jazz venue. "He just loved jazz," Early said of Gadson. But he died in 2007, before he could restore the house, on 33rd Street near Oxford.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
When Chris' Jazz Cafe announced in November that it would host comedy nights, musical purists groused. How dare Center City's only for-profit jazz club bring another art form into that hallowed space? Chris' booking agent, Alan McMahon, joked that the event would be a welcome change. "The club presents over 500 jazz shows a year and will continue to," McMahon wrote in an e-mail at the time. "A little comedy will be good for all. " That first stand-up show was packed, and in December McMahon sent a second e-mail saying that Chris would expand into different sounds that complemented its jazz aesthetic.
NEWS
August 26, 2012 | By Vernon Clark and Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Staff Writers
Byard Lancaster, 70, the Philadelphia jazz musician who earned an international reputation as an avant-garde musical explorer in the 1960s and 1970s, died of cancer Thursday, Aug. 23, at KeystoneCare in Wyndmoor, according to his sister, Mary Ann Lancaster Tyler. In the decades that followed his early fame, he became a local institution, playing saxophone and flute on the streets, in subway concourses, and at clubs around the city. Mr. Lancaster played alto, soprano, and tenor saxophones, as well as flute, clarinet, and piano.
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