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John Doe

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NEWS
September 6, 1990 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
Like Neil Young and too few others in rock and roll, John Doe kicks up a throttling roar that goes beyond pure wattage. Unafraid to sound wounded (or puzzled) when singing songs of open desperation, he puts blood and guts into his performance - and because he's willing to risk such self-revelation, every little phrase acquires an intense luster. In his hands, even a charming pop song such as John Hiatt's "The Real One" is tinged with a trembling woe. Those who followed Doe in X know this; his mere presence on stage was one of the things that made the Los Angeles band a compelling force in the early '80s.
NEWS
October 10, 2002 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
JAYNA DAVIS - the dogged Oklahoma City investigative reporter who thinks she can link Middle East terrorists and the bombing of the Murrah Building - has been waiting seven years to share her dossier with a senior member of our government. Today, she gets her chance. At 4 p.m., Jayna Davis has an appointment on Capitol Hill with a member of the U.S. Senate. And not just any senator. Davis will meet with none other than Arlen Specter. He's the perfect man for this job. Think about it. He's a brilliant mind; a man whose politics we may question from time to time, but never his ethics; a former prosecutor; author of the single-bullet theory; the controversial but incisive cross-examiner of Anita Hill.
NEWS
July 29, 1986 | By Donna Shaw, Inquirer Staff Writer
He might be somebody's grandfather. Maybe he used to sit contentedly on a porch swing, sipping lemonade and watching the children play nearby. He might be somebody's best friend. Maybe he used to spend his evenings in a neighborhood tavern, tipping beers and trading wisecracks with his buddies. But whomever he might once have been, he is now known officially as John Doe. That's the name the state has put on the plastic wristband he wears for identification, in case he wanders off from Building 53 at Norristown State Hospital.
NEWS
August 1, 1986 | By Donna Shaw, Inquirer Staff Writer
An elderly man known only as John Doe, who spent the last eight months in Norristown State Hospital because no one could identify him, has been reunited with his family. State police from the Limerick barracks in Montgomery County said yesterday that they had learned the man is William Harris, 72, of the 2200 block of North Colorado Street in Philadelphia. Harris - dubbed John Doe by hospital officials - had been a ward of the state since November, when he was found wandering in Plymouth Township.
NEWS
June 24, 1992 | By JACK MATTHEWS
Virtually overnight he becomes a major political force. One day he is unknown to most Americans, then a network appearance brings his simple, no- nonsense views into homes all over the country and he is a national obsession. His picture is on the cover of Time magazine, a massive grass-roots movement forms across the United States, leaders of both the Democratic and Republican parties are scrambling to derail what might become a runaway third- party presidential campaign. No, not him. Him!
NEWS
January 27, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia police said Sunday that the body of a white male was found at 1:18 p.m. Sunday on the bank of the Schuylkill River in the 4400 block of Kelly Drive. The man, identified as "John Doe," was found caught in a tree line on the river bank by Greater Philadelphia Search and Rescue. The scene was held, police said. Police said they would not likely release on Sunday the identity of the person found. The discovery has raised questions that it could be that of a missing Bucks County teacher, Christopher Tully, 40. But police emphasize there are others missing in the area besides Tully and that no name will be released until after any family members are notified and an autopsy is conducted.
NEWS
January 18, 2000 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Not having AIDS turned out to be almost as traumatic as actually having it for the man known as John Doe. When Doe found out that he had been misdiagnosed as being HIV positive, he went to pieces, he claims. He said he suffered "night sweats, nausea, loss of sleep, skin lesions, rashes, recurring headaches, hair loss, scalp irritation, recurring crying fits, and loss of concentration. " He also complained of "extreme anxiety, depression, belief that he was going to die of AIDS within a few years, post-traumatic stress disorder, permanent lack of trust in medical providers, despondency, humiliation, and social isolation.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2005 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
During John Doe's blistering set at the South by Southwest Music Festival in Austin, Texas, last month, the punk-rock godfather and part-time actor prefaced "Hwy. 5" by saying: "California is . . . mythic. Say what you want about it. It's mythic. " "I can only hope that my songs and lyrics have one-tenth of the mythic quality that California and Los Angeles have," Doe, a founding member of the seminal Los Angeles punk band X, said over a post-show beer. He plays the World Cafe Live on Tuesday, promoting his stripped-down, bluesy new album, Forever Hasn't Happened Yet. "Certainly we based a lot of X on the decline of Western civilization," he said, referencing the 1981 Penelope Spheeris documentary featuring the band, with Doe's first wife and X singer Exene Cervenka, guitarist Billy Zoom, and drummer D.J. Bonebrake.
NEWS
February 18, 2004 | By Daniel Rubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Been "sharing" Bruce Springsteen, Nelly or Nas on the Web lately? You might be interested in a suit filed yesterday that lists 203 Comcast Internet customers named John Doe. Let the paranoia begin. It's impossible to tell how many of those accused of illegally trading copyrighted material are from the Philadelphia area. In all, 17 record labels sued 531 people across the country yesterday, filing the paperwork in the cities where the Internet service providers are based.
NEWS
November 29, 1994 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To the SEPTA manager who calls himself "John Doe," it was an invasion of his constitutional right to privacy. A powerful SEPTA official had made him suspect that behind every unreturned greeting by a co-worker was the secret he had tried so hard to hide: He had the AIDS virus. To SEPTA officials, it is a case of "no harm, no foul. " Officials of the regional transit authority say they accidentally found out Doe was HIV- positive while reviewing an audit of prescription benefits that happened to include the names of SEPTA workers.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 9, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
A federal appeals court in Philadelphia ruled Wednesday that prosecutors in the George Washington Bridge lane-closure case do not need to disclose the names of unindicted coconspirators to the news media. A three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit ruled that the names of individuals who prosecutors believe joined the conspiracy to jam traffic at the bridge in 2013, but whom the government did not charge with a crime, were "not subject to any First Amendment or common law right of public access.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
This isn't something you'd ordinarily hear from any band members - let alone so-called angry punks - who have been together for nearly 40 years: "I can honestly say that we have probably never sounded better together or even been closer friends than we are now. " So states John Doe, the bassist, co-singer, and writer of X, Los Angeles' epically blunt, poetic, and stormy punk avatars. After watching original bandmate Billy Zoom (guitarist) go through several cancers, and original bandmate and ex-wife Exene Cervenka (singer and lyricist)
SPORTS
July 14, 2016 | By Mike Jensen, STAFF WRITER
Anyone who wants the Paterno statue back up . . . please, just stop. To claim that Joe Paterno can't rebut any of these decades-old allegations, with more just unsealed Tuesday, is true and so obviously beside the point. The allegations create dark questions, and those dark questions will never go away. Stand with Paterno if you must, but understand you're now standing against a man who claimed he went to Penn State's head coach at a Penn State football camp in 1976, stating in a 2014 deposition - yes, almost four decades later - that he told Paterno as a 14-year-old how Jerry Sandusky, a member of Paterno's staff, had inserted his finger into the teenager's anus.
NEWS
July 14, 2016
The following are summaries of excerpts from five accusers' depositions included in the unsealed records. John Doe 150 Read the deposition Deposition date: Oct. 13, 2014 Doe 150 described a 1976 incident, when he was 14, that occurred during a high school football camp in 1976. He said Sandusky, while showering with him and other boys in a Penn State locker room, inserted his finger into the the then-teen's anus. The man said he later told other adults at the camp, including Paterno, about what happened.
NEWS
June 29, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
RICHMOND, Ind. - Nicholas Peter Zizzamia, a Villanova University senior who could not hide his sadness from the world, once told a pal he would someday vanish without a trace. Nearly four decades after the 22-year-old music fan left his Cherry Hill home and never returned, a diligent township detective came to believe he'd finally tracked Zizzamia down, in the person of a "John Doe" who had slit his wrist in a Richmond motel room a week after the melancholy young man's May 12, 1979, disappearance.
NEWS
June 8, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
A federal appeals panel on Monday weighed First Amendment rights against the privacy interests of individuals who have not been charged with a crime, as it considered whether the names of unindicted accomplices in the George Washington Bridge lane-closing scandal should be provided to the news media. Nearly two hours of oral argument seemed to indicate that the three-judge panel's ruling may hinge on an arcane legal point - whether the list of so-called unindicted coconspirators, already provided by prosecutors to the defense, supplements the public indictment or is discovery material that is shielded from the public.
NEWS
June 6, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
On one level, the legal fight over access to the names of unindicted accomplices in the George Washington Bridge lane-closure case pits the public's First Amendment rights against privacy interests of individuals who haven't been charged with a crime. Yet the case may turn on an arcane argument over whether the list of so-called unindicted coconspirators was part of a routine sharing of evidence among lawyers or carries greater legal significance as a supplement to the public indictment.
NEWS
June 5, 2016
A Personal History of L.A. Punk By John Doe with Tom DeSavia and Friends Da Capo. 336 pp. $26.99 Reviewed by Tom Wilk The music that emerged from the Los Angeles punk rock scene of the late 1970s and early '80s resisted easy categorization. The aggression of X, the thrash of Black Flag, the pop/rock sounds of the Go-Go's, and the roots-music dynamism of the Blasters reflected the variety of the musical landscape. It's an era skillfully recounted in Under the Big Black Sun: A Personal History of L.A. Punk by John Doe with Tom DeSavia and Friends.
NEWS
May 19, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - A federal appeals court judge on Tuesday temporarily blocked the disclosure of a list of individuals prosecutors believe joined the alleged criminal conspiracy in the George Washington Bridge lane-closure case but whom the government did not charge. The ruling was a victory for a person identified in court papers as John Doe, who says he is one of the so-called unindicted coconspirators. A group of news organizations - including the company that publishes the Inquirer - is appealing part of the judge's order, requesting access to the list of coconspirators redacting Doe's identity.
NEWS
May 15, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - A federal judge on Friday denied a request from an unindicted accomplice in the George Washington Bridge lane-closure case to block prosecutors from disclosing the individual's identity to the news media. U.S. District Judge Susan D. Wigenton did, however, extend to Tuesday a deadline for prosecutors to make public a list of individuals they say joined the alleged criminal conspiracy but whom the government has not charged. In the interim, the "unindicted coconspirator," identified in court papers as John Doe, appealed the judge's decision to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit in Philadelphia.
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