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John Entwistle

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NEWS
December 23, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
LAS VEGAS - As a guitar-maker for the stars, musician Ed Roman found a platform for fierce opinions about his commercially manufactured competition, exhorting musicians to drop what he called "misdirected ignorant brand loyalty. " His own guitars found their way into the hands of everyone from Ted Nugent to British rockers Eric Burdon of The Animals and John Entwistle of The Who. Roman, sometimes likened to a Viking for his red hair, was unafraid to unleash self-described politically incorrect opinions about foreign-made products, chain stores and corporate guitar manufacturers.
NEWS
July 29, 2002 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Who wore black at the Tweeter Center on Saturday, and their humor matched their attire. "John Entwistle, wherever you are, get well soon," Pete Townshend said during a galvanic performance before a sold-out crowd, to the bassist who died last month at 57 of a cocaine-triggered heart attack just as the band was about to head out on tour. Townshend acknowledged that Entwistle's last-minute replacement, Pino Palladino, had "saved our bacon. " And he introduced drummer Zak Starkey as the replacement for "another Who corpse," Keith Moon, who died in 1978.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2002 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Despite the death of bassist John Entwistle, the two surviving members of The Who decided yesterday to resume their scheduled three-month U.S. tour. "The band decided to recommence the tour beginning at the Hollywood Bowl," a Monday night show, according to a message posted on guitarist Pete Townshend's Web site. It was unclear who might replace Entwistle, a cofounder of the band when he was a London teen. And no word on whether the band would play all the dates on the tour.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2002 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A heart attack caused by cocaine use was responsible for the death of John Entwistle, 57, the bassist for the rock band The Who. A Las Vegas coroner said Entwistle's death was accidental and was not an overdose. Exactly how much of the drug Entwistle had used remains unknown. Entwistle's body was found in his bed at the Hard Rock Hotel on June 27, one day before the band was scheduled to launch a three-month nationwide tour at the hotel's concert hall. (The Who is scheduled to play at the Tweeter Center tonight.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1996 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
On one side of the CoreStates Center stage stood Who guitarist and songwriter Pete Townshend. Looking haggard and dour, he sang the refrain "Why should I care?" as if he really needed a good reason and was counting the minutes until his chore of a performance was over. A few feet away, his longtime sidekick Roger Daltrey stood stock-still, consumed by his mission. His eyes fixed on a faraway point, Daltrey sang the life story of a troubled boy named Jimmy as though the tale offered urgent insights.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1994 | By Sam Wood, FOR THE INQUIRER
How do you think he does it? Roger Daltrey looked as if he were setting himself up for a fall. Sunday's show at the Mann Music Center was billed as a tribute to his former bandmate. And at first glance, Daltrey Sings Townshend: A Celebration of the Music of The Who, appeared to be an act of hubris: An aging rock god cashing in on his past and trading on Pete Townshend's recent Broadway success with Tommy. So did Daltrey acquit himself? You better, you bet. For 2 1/2 hours, the 50-year-old singer effortlessly staked his claim on a parade of muscular Who favorites.
NEWS
June 14, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Nobody bends and tugs on the blues like guitarist, vocalist, and songwriter Sonny Landreth. His rangy, soaring tones, mangy, percussive clink, and penchant for wringing crisply original musical and lyrical vibes from the aged three-chord form are without equal. Ask John Hiatt and Patty Griffin, with whom he's recorded. Or Eric Clapton, with whom Landreth once gigged, winning this compliment: "Landreth is probably the most underestimated musician on the planet. " Adulation aside, you have to get up close to Landreth to appreciate what he does, especially in a trio setting such as the game he ran at Wilmington's World Cafe Live at the Queen on Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2000 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
At some point in the 21st century, rock will undoubtedly go the way of the dinosaurs, and archaeologists will be able to learn about the species only from the fossilized droppings left behind. The lucky ones will find The Who's BBC Sessions (MCA . . ), a 26-track collection of previously unreleased Radio One performances that contains the Jurassic artifacts of a vanished rock-and-roll animal: Pete Townshend's windmilling power chords and peerless rhythm playing, Keith Moon's falling-down-a-flight-of-stairs drum fills, John Entwistle's boombastic bass salvos, and Roger Daltrey's singing like there's a riot goin' on. A worthy bookend to the band's Live at Leeds, BBC Sessions, which came out Tuesday, is flush with sterling live takes of classic Who material, rare covers, and interesting odds and sods.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1989 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
For the entire first set, Roger kept his back to the stage, pogoing to every tune the Who lashed out. Singing every song. Executing all the body english he could while astride a flimsy field-level folding chair. Facing the audience as if he himself were on stage, while the defibrillating decibels pounded over him. The slender red-haired man in the maroon shorts and souvenir tank top from Tijuana never once looked at the band. He never saw the wide-screen close-ups of sweaty, rawboned Roger Daltrey, windmilling, pony-tailed Pete Townshend, or snowy-haired John Entwistle.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, For The Inquirer
Pete Townshend was 28 in 1973 when The Who released Quadrophenia , the rock opera about a 1960s teenage Mod named Jimmy, whose fractured self reflected the personalities of all four members of the explosive British band. The windmilling Who guitarist, the most self-consciously analytic of the great baby-boom-era songwriters, had hardly reached the old age that eight years earlier, in "My Generation," he would have hoped he'd die before attaining. But when Townshend wrote Quadrophenia - which he performed Saturday in its entirety along with front man Roger Daltrey and eight other musicians at a sold-out Wells Fargo Center - he was nearly a decade removed from the torturous teenage subject matter he chronicled in the most highly ambitious song cycle of his career.
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NEWS
June 14, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Nobody bends and tugs on the blues like guitarist, vocalist, and songwriter Sonny Landreth. His rangy, soaring tones, mangy, percussive clink, and penchant for wringing crisply original musical and lyrical vibes from the aged three-chord form are without equal. Ask John Hiatt and Patty Griffin, with whom he's recorded. Or Eric Clapton, with whom Landreth once gigged, winning this compliment: "Landreth is probably the most underestimated musician on the planet. " Adulation aside, you have to get up close to Landreth to appreciate what he does, especially in a trio setting such as the game he ran at Wilmington's World Cafe Live at the Queen on Thursday.
NEWS
May 24, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph Beinlich's skin is pale. At 57, he walks about as fast as someone two decades older. He is OK with that, given the alternative. "I'd rather be living than kicking up daisies," said Beinlich, of Philadelphia's Olney neighborhood. Beinlich is being kept alive by an artificial heart. Temple University Hospital surgeons removed his own, badly diseased organ in August and replaced it with the 5.6-ounce plastic device. More than 1,000 other patients have gotten the implants since the Food and Drug Administration approved them in 2004.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, For The Inquirer
Pete Townshend was 28 in 1973 when The Who released Quadrophenia , the rock opera about a 1960s teenage Mod named Jimmy, whose fractured self reflected the personalities of all four members of the explosive British band. The windmilling Who guitarist, the most self-consciously analytic of the great baby-boom-era songwriters, had hardly reached the old age that eight years earlier, in "My Generation," he would have hoped he'd die before attaining. But when Townshend wrote Quadrophenia - which he performed Saturday in its entirety along with front man Roger Daltrey and eight other musicians at a sold-out Wells Fargo Center - he was nearly a decade removed from the torturous teenage subject matter he chronicled in the most highly ambitious song cycle of his career.
NEWS
December 23, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
LAS VEGAS - As a guitar-maker for the stars, musician Ed Roman found a platform for fierce opinions about his commercially manufactured competition, exhorting musicians to drop what he called "misdirected ignorant brand loyalty. " His own guitars found their way into the hands of everyone from Ted Nugent to British rockers Eric Burdon of The Animals and John Entwistle of The Who. Roman, sometimes likened to a Viking for his red hair, was unafraid to unleash self-described politically incorrect opinions about foreign-made products, chain stores and corporate guitar manufacturers.
NEWS
September 12, 2006 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
If Betty Townshend hadn't broken her hip, The Who would not have recorded Endless Wire, its first album of new material in 24 years. And Betty's son, Pete, and his sole surviving original bandmate, Roger Daltrey, wouldn't be leading The Who - or "The Two," as fans have cheekily dubbed them - into the Wachovia Center tonight for the first date of their North American tour. Of course, just by giving birth to the now 61-year-old Pete, Betty Townshend can be credited as the source of one of the most brilliant resumes in popular music.
NEWS
July 29, 2002 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Who wore black at the Tweeter Center on Saturday, and their humor matched their attire. "John Entwistle, wherever you are, get well soon," Pete Townshend said during a galvanic performance before a sold-out crowd, to the bassist who died last month at 57 of a cocaine-triggered heart attack just as the band was about to head out on tour. Townshend acknowledged that Entwistle's last-minute replacement, Pino Palladino, had "saved our bacon. " And he introduced drummer Zak Starkey as the replacement for "another Who corpse," Keith Moon, who died in 1978.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2002 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A heart attack caused by cocaine use was responsible for the death of John Entwistle, 57, the bassist for the rock band The Who. A Las Vegas coroner said Entwistle's death was accidental and was not an overdose. Exactly how much of the drug Entwistle had used remains unknown. Entwistle's body was found in his bed at the Hard Rock Hotel on June 27, one day before the band was scheduled to launch a three-month nationwide tour at the hotel's concert hall. (The Who is scheduled to play at the Tweeter Center tonight.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2002 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Despite the death of bassist John Entwistle, the two surviving members of The Who decided yesterday to resume their scheduled three-month U.S. tour. "The band decided to recommence the tour beginning at the Hollywood Bowl," a Monday night show, according to a message posted on guitarist Pete Townshend's Web site. It was unclear who might replace Entwistle, a cofounder of the band when he was a London teen. And no word on whether the band would play all the dates on the tour.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2000 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
At some point in the 21st century, rock will undoubtedly go the way of the dinosaurs, and archaeologists will be able to learn about the species only from the fossilized droppings left behind. The lucky ones will find The Who's BBC Sessions (MCA . . ), a 26-track collection of previously unreleased Radio One performances that contains the Jurassic artifacts of a vanished rock-and-roll animal: Pete Townshend's windmilling power chords and peerless rhythm playing, Keith Moon's falling-down-a-flight-of-stairs drum fills, John Entwistle's boombastic bass salvos, and Roger Daltrey's singing like there's a riot goin' on. A worthy bookend to the band's Live at Leeds, BBC Sessions, which came out Tuesday, is flush with sterling live takes of classic Who material, rare covers, and interesting odds and sods.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1996 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
On one side of the CoreStates Center stage stood Who guitarist and songwriter Pete Townshend. Looking haggard and dour, he sang the refrain "Why should I care?" as if he really needed a good reason and was counting the minutes until his chore of a performance was over. A few feet away, his longtime sidekick Roger Daltrey stood stock-still, consumed by his mission. His eyes fixed on a faraway point, Daltrey sang the life story of a troubled boy named Jimmy as though the tale offered urgent insights.
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