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NEWS
February 13, 2015
I'VE BEEN disappointed by many people in my lifetime as, I'm sure, have you. Unless we have hopes that exceed our expectations, life is a colorless and barren experience. At best, it's a mediocre slog. But when you trust someone to act honorably and then they turn around and betray you with dishonesty, it hurts. Depending upon your investment in that person and his or her place in your world, the hurt could be as fleeting as a paper cut or as painful and enduring as an amputation. By that measure, what Brian Williams did is a small bruise, one that will fade in a week or two. I had few expectations of the man who fed me the nightly news, someone who had a pleasant enough delivery, a nice face and some real journalistic chops.
NEWS
June 8, 2005 | By John Shiffman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A controversy over a chili commercial featuring two national icons from the Philadelphia region - the pro football narrator known as the "Voice of God" and the Campbell Soup Co. - has been settled. The son of the late John Facenda Sr., the veteran Philadelphia television anchor famous for his thunderous and melodramatic NFL Films narrations, sued the Camden-based soup company last year alleging it used a Facenda-sounding voice without permission or compensation. A cash settlement was approved Monday by U.S. District Judge Eduardo C. Robreno.
NEWS
July 20, 2006 | By Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The family of the legendary Philadelphia broadcaster John Facenda has filed a federal lawsuit against the NFL and NFL Films over the use of his well-known and distinctive voice to hawk a video game in an infomercial. A lawyer for the family, Paul Lauricella of the Beasley Law Firm in Philadelphia, yesterday said the suit was filed Monday in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia and names the NFL, NFL Properties L.L.C., and NFL Films Inc. as defendants. The suit contends that the defendants allowed recordings of the baritone known as the "Voice of God" to be used last August in an infomercial in advance of the release of a popular football video game, Madden 2006.
NEWS
September 8, 2000
Negative reporters positively obscene It's a shame we don't have journalists today like Walter Winchell, David Brinkley, John Facenda and Walter Cronkite. Professionalism was their trademark. They weren't downgraders and negative. Reporters today should take a page from these four great journalists' books. Journalists today like to dig up dirt. They will cause the United States to bust wide open, because of going too far with reporting things that are no interest to the public.
SPORTS
May 4, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
The son of legendary NFL Films announcer John Facenda can seek damages for the use of his father's voice on a program about a John Madden video game, a federal judge ruled here yesterday. Facenda, in a written agreement signed before his 1984 death, gave the NFL full use of his announcing work - except when it came to any product endorsement, the judge's order said. John Facenda Jr. has been vigilant about protecting the use of his father's thundering baritone, which some have dubbed "the voice of God. " The ruling allows him to seek damages from a jury on the question of liability, although U.S. Magistrate Judge Jacob P. Hart threw out his invasion-of-privacy claim.
NEWS
November 20, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IF YOU WERE going to follow John Facenda on the air, you had to have a great voice. Maybe nobody could match the legendary Facenda, whose familiar baritone was called the "voice of God" when he broadcast for NFL Films. But Jeff Kaye brought it off. After Facenda died in 1984, Jeff became the voice of NFL Films, lending his own sonorous baritone to the pro-football features of the Mount Laurel, N.J.-based company. Maybe not quite God, but close to it. "I can say to this day, when I look at some of the shows Jeff narrated over the years, I am still fascinated by the way he told a story," said Kevin McLoughlin, director of post-production for NFL Films.
SPORTS
September 23, 2012
More lockout fallout *  ("Will anyone blink in time this season?" Sept. 16) These negotiations are like war. After the very first meeting, the players union should have put Crosby in front of a camera at a press conference and have him go all doom and gloom and cancel all further talks. Owners always win in this because they know the players want to play. The Pink Floyd Philly.com/Sports Donald Fehr vs. Gary Bettman. You have a better shot of Netanyahu and Ahmadinejad getting together for peace talks!
NEWS
March 8, 1996 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Thomas J. Facenda, 80, of Upper Gwynedd Township, a retired government supervisor, died Tuesday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Facenda was the brother of the late John Facenda, the eminent Philadelphia news anchor and commentator on a host of professional football films. Mr. Facenda graduated from Roman Catholic High School in 1933 and lived in Philadelphia until he moved to Upper Gwynedd Township three years ago. For 32 years, Mr. Facenda worked for the Department of Defense in Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 26, 1991 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles "The Doggie Man" Frank, 77, a legendary vendor who sold hot dogs at the Palestra, Connie Mack Stadium and the Vet for 32 years, died Wednesday at Suburban General Hospital in Norristown. Mr. Frank had a way of standing out in a crowd. He was a tall man who looked like Charlie the Tuna and yelled "Doggie- Oh!" as he walked through the stands. His mouth was always open, and his eyes never stopped scanning the aisles for customers. He was seldom distracted by a ball game.
NEWS
February 27, 2005 | By Terry Bitman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Return with us now to those thrilling days of yesteryear when WIBG radio rocked Philadelphia's teenagers and Willie the Worm wooed the preschool set on television. When the zany Ernie Kovacs cavorted in the morning, and things went bump in the night with that cool ghoul Roland and his wife, My Dear, so shy she never left her coffin. When the dulcet voice of John Facenda made us feel comfy as he signed off his local newscasts by wishing all a "good night tonight and a good day tomorrow.
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NEWS
February 13, 2015
I'VE BEEN disappointed by many people in my lifetime as, I'm sure, have you. Unless we have hopes that exceed our expectations, life is a colorless and barren experience. At best, it's a mediocre slog. But when you trust someone to act honorably and then they turn around and betray you with dishonesty, it hurts. Depending upon your investment in that person and his or her place in your world, the hurt could be as fleeting as a paper cut or as painful and enduring as an amputation. By that measure, what Brian Williams did is a small bruise, one that will fade in a week or two. I had few expectations of the man who fed me the nightly news, someone who had a pleasant enough delivery, a nice face and some real journalistic chops.
NEWS
November 20, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IF YOU WERE going to follow John Facenda on the air, you had to have a great voice. Maybe nobody could match the legendary Facenda, whose familiar baritone was called the "voice of God" when he broadcast for NFL Films. But Jeff Kaye brought it off. After Facenda died in 1984, Jeff became the voice of NFL Films, lending his own sonorous baritone to the pro-football features of the Mount Laurel, N.J.-based company. Maybe not quite God, but close to it. "I can say to this day, when I look at some of the shows Jeff narrated over the years, I am still fascinated by the way he told a story," said Kevin McLoughlin, director of post-production for NFL Films.
SPORTS
September 23, 2012
More lockout fallout *  ("Will anyone blink in time this season?" Sept. 16) These negotiations are like war. After the very first meeting, the players union should have put Crosby in front of a camera at a press conference and have him go all doom and gloom and cancel all further talks. Owners always win in this because they know the players want to play. The Pink Floyd Philly.com/Sports Donald Fehr vs. Gary Bettman. You have a better shot of Netanyahu and Ahmadinejad getting together for peace talks!
NEWS
September 19, 2012 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Steve Sabol, 69, an art history major and football star in college who combined those two passions to help transform the family business, NFL Films, into a modern mythmaking marvel, died Tuesday, Sept. 18. He had been battling brain cancer since 2011. An inoperable tumor had been discovered just days after his father, Ed, the NFL Films founder, was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame. A lifelong Philadelphia-area resident who never lost his accent or his boyish idealism, Mr. Sabol forever changed the way Americans view their sports.
NEWS
September 19, 2012 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Steve Sabol, an art history major and football star in college who combined those two passions to help transform the family business, NFL Films, into a modern mythmaking marvel, died Tuesday at 69. Mr. Sabol had been battling brain cancer since 2011. An inoperable tumor had been discovered just days after his father, Ed, the NFL Films founder, was elected to Pro Football's Hall of Fame. A lifelong Philadelphia-area resident who never lost his accent or his boyish idealism, Mr. Sabol forever changed the way Americans view their sports.
NEWS
May 23, 2010 | By Michael Smerconish
John Facenda, the legendary local broadcaster who brought the "Voice of God" to NFL Films, is often credited for the famous reference to the "frozen tundra of Lambeau Field. " Facenda, however, never said those words about the Green Bay Packers' field. Some attribute them to ESPN's Chris Berman. Others believe the originator was Bill Woodson, whose credits include voicing the opening to the TV series The Odd Couple . But everyone agrees on one thing: The tundra was indeed frozen.
NEWS
October 22, 2009 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
IN 2006, JACK Huberman published a book called "101 People Who Are Really Screwing America. " Maybe he should add his own name to the list. In the heat of the debate surrounding Rush Limbaugh and the NFL St. Louis Rams, Huberman initiated a game of 21st-century whisper down the lane. But he didn't wait for the lane to mangle the message. He botched it from the start. The result is a cautionary tale about the recklessness that feeding a 24/7 media can induce. Limbaugh was No. 27 on Huberman's list.
NEWS
September 21, 2009 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The octogenarian with the still-owlish face was once a local legend, the cerebral local TV news commentator heralded as "the Socrates of the small screen. " Donald G. Barnhouse Jr. still has that sonorous voice that hints at omniscience, but no, he doesn't want to talk about his past and can't imagine why anyone on earth would be interested. ("Don't write this story," he pleads at one point.) What he really wants to talk about is . . . the Bible. Last week, as Pastor Barnhouse sat among the brightly colored kids' jackets, sneakers, and toys in his Bridgeport church hall, the church's impending consignment sale, aimed at swelling his small congregation, was a far bigger concern to him than any lost fame.
NEWS
July 24, 2009 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sure it was Ed Sabol who created NFL Films and son Steve who helped make it such an iconic American institution that yesterday Pennsylvania stuck a historic marker outside its original Center City headquarters. But if not for Pete Rozelle, Jerry Wolman and Fritzy Siegel, that football might never have gotten rolling. Wolman, the onetime Eagles owner, gave the fledgling enterprise its first home. Rozelle, the league's longtime commissioner, insisted it remain in Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 16, 2009 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
'WE LOST our voice. " What fitting words for Phillies President David Montgomery to use to express the significance of the passing of Harry Kalas. Whether singing "High Hopes" or declaring a Mike Schmidt home run "outta here," Harry had a gift. He was our voice and we will miss him. But when it comes to giving good voice, Philadelphians are lucky. Not every sports town can boast of a legend like Harry the K or a voice like John Facenda. In fact, many sports fans, news junkies and music lovers never find that specific broadcaster, news anchor or deejay to put up on a pedestal.
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