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John Felske

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SPORTS
June 18, 1987 | By PAUL HAGEN, Daily News Sports Writer
Beset by four losses in their first six games on this road trip, the Phillies today announced the firing of manager John Felske. At a press conference in the Wrigley Field stadium club, president Bill Giles said third base coach Lee Elia would replace Felske for the remainder of the season, with a chance to be considered as manager in 1988. Elia, who was fired as the Cubs' manager during the 1983 season, is a graduate of Olney High School. It really is not surprising that the move was made.
NEWS
July 15, 1986
I found it painful the way Steve Carlton, future Hall of Famer, was treated by the shallowness of Bill Giles, the Phillies' owner. The classless release of Mr. Carlton should not surprise me, though. There seems to be a lack of consideration and ungratefulness toward many longtime, dedicated Phillies since Mr. Giles assumed ownership. Since taking over, Mr. Giles has managed to dismantle a championship team and place it at the bottom of the standings. Do we remember names such as Greg Luzinski and Larry Bowa, players whom Mr. Giles so easily disposed of?
SPORTS
May 19, 1988 | By Jayson Stark, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Phillies spent their day yesterday playing baseball in scenic Candlestick Park. John Felske spent his day hanging out with the zoning board in Mundelein, Ill., trying to get approval for a 15-minute-oil-change franchise. No one asked him why he chose to pitch to the Skokie Gulf Station's top mechanic with the first car bay open. Next week, the Phillies will be kicking off their longest homestand of the year. John Felske will be kicking off a nine-day fishing trip with his son at Lac la Croix in Canada.
SPORTS
April 25, 1987 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Felske will remain the manager of the Phillies even if the team stays in last place through late June, Bill Giles said last night. "Number one, I want to make it clear that John Felske's job is not in jeopardy," the president of the Phillies said after last night's game with the Pittsburgh Pirates at Veterans Stadium was postponed. "I put no blame on John at all. "Votes of confidence are bad luck for a manager," Giles said, smiling softly between puffs on a cigarette, "but John Felske is not the problem.
SPORTS
April 3, 1986 | By BILL CONLIN, Daily News Sports Writer
Considering his reputation for not being overly articulate, Jeff Stone punctuated his exit to the Portland Beavers with one trenchant thought. "How come I have to hit .300?" he said. "Vince Coleman didn't hit .300 and he stayed up. Willie Wilson didn't hit .300 and he stayed up. How come I have to hit .300 to stay here and those other fast guys didn't?" Stone also said he will adjust to yesterday's demotion better than he did last season, when the Phillies sent him packing to Portland on June 13. In his last three minor league tours, Stone has hit .329, .316 and .317.
SPORTS
April 16, 1987 | By PAUL HAGEN, Daily News Sports Writer
Phillies president Bill Giles was more than pleased when he heard that manager John Felske had called a team meeting before last night's game against the New York Mets. "Because if he hadn't, I was going to," Giles said. "We've just been playing awful baseball. " Felske's meeting, which lasted just five minutes, didn't seem to have an immediate effect. The Phillies didn't make the mass quantity of silly mistakes they had made in many of the previous losses. The key to this 4-1 loss was probably when Mets starter Sid Fernandez arrived at Veterans Stadium safely.
SPORTS
October 22, 2008 | By Peter Pascarelli FOR THE INQUIRER
1985: The love affair between fans and the Phillies that had begun in the glory years of the mid 1970s was officially ruptured during the course of a miserable 75-87 season. Attendance fell to the lowest levels in years, amid growing dissatisfaction with conditions at Veterans Stadium. On the field, the ruling junta known as the Gang of Six decreed that manager John Felske shift eventual Hall of Fame third baseman Mike Schmidt to first in order to make room for prospect Rick Schu, who never panned out. Schmidt complained in late summer about the negative fans, the awful artificial turf at the Vet, and memorably, the "smell of cat urine in the home dugout.
SPORTS
June 3, 1987 | By PAUL HAGEN, Daily News Sports Writer
It is a well-accepted baseball axiom that you aren't supposed to put the winning run on base. And Phillies manager John Felske usually manages by the book. Sometimes, though, you have to take a chance. The Phillies did that in the bottom of the ninth inning last night . . . and it worked. Here's the situation: The Phillies were leading, 7-6. The Giants had Candy Maldonado on second with two outs, Chili Davis at the plate and Bob Melvin on deck. Felske came to the mound and conferred with Steve Bedrosian.
SPORTS
August 21, 1991 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
Lance Parrish was the catcher back then, an American League All-Star so coveted as the last piece to the puzzle and the Phillies' cleanup hitter of the future that management resisted the strong tides of collusion to sign him. Mike Schmidt was, as always, at third base and was coming off an MVP season. The usual outfield was Chris James in left, Milt Thompson in center, Glenn Wilson in right. Anchoring the starting rotation were Shane Rawley, Kevin Gross and Don Carman. Steve Bedrosian was on his way to piling up 40 saves and winning the Cy Young Award.
SPORTS
March 12, 1986 | By BILL CONLIN, Daily News Sports Writer
Spring training is about as important to Mike Schmidt as a spring minicamp is to a 10-year NFL veteran. The injured (strained lower back) veteran could hit .150 down here with no homers and there would be no doubt whatever who the Phillies opening day third baseman would be. At the other end of the scale, spring training is part reward and part evaluation for players such as Chris James, Randy Day, Kevin Ward and Joe Cipolloni. Unless the sky falls on Jack Russell Stadium, they are penciled in as starters for the Portland Beavers.
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SPORTS
June 12, 2012 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
BALTIMORE - You put the ball in Cliff Lee's $120 million hand so it doesn't come down to Ty Wigginton's shaky glove. You pay Jonathan Papelbon $50 million, then order him to enjoy the view of another walk-off loss from out in the bullpen. You play Wigginton at third, Michael Martinez at second, and Hector Luna at first, then watch your defense give away outs. You lose in the 10th inning when Baltimore's .255-hitting cleanup hitter doubles home a run off Joe Savery, and you have to ponder whether that's worse than the .237-hitting 8-hole hitter blasting a three-run bomb off Lee in the fourth.
NEWS
June 11, 2012 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
BALTIMORE - You put the ball in Cliff Lee's $120 million hand so it doesn't come down to Ty Wigginton's shaky glove. You pay Jonathan Papelbon $50 million, then order him to enjoy the view of another walk-off loss from out in the bullpen. You play Wigginton at third, Michael Martinez at second, and Hector Luna at first, then watch your defense give away outs. You lose in the 10th inning when Baltimore's .255-hitting cleanup hitter doubles home a run off Joe Savery, and you have to ponder whether that's worse than the .237-hitting 8-hole hitter blasting a three-run bomb off Lee in the fourth.
SPORTS
March 6, 2011 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
BRADENTON, Fla. - For all we know, John Felske (1985-87) was somewhere in the ballpark, maybe working the corn-dog stand behind the first-base bleachers. The Phillies' least well-known manager of the last quarter-century may well have been at McKechnie Field on Friday. There, sitting with some other scouts, was Jim Fregosi (1991-96). And over there, wearing a bright yellow Pirates jersey and hitting fungoes, was Nick Leyva ('89-91). Behind the plate, sitting with the rest of the Phillies brass, was one Dallas Green ('79-81)
SPORTS
October 29, 2010
THE PHILLIES won 97 games this year, more than any other team in baseball, and Charlie Manuel won't win manager of the year, because the voters are always looking for who did the most with the least, because it makes for a niftier story. Yo, I'm here to tell you that Charlie Manuel is the best Phillies manager in the last 50 years. Maybe forever! Been here 6 years, in the playoffs the last 4, in the World Series twice. Won it once. His teams are 544-428 in the regular season, a .560 percentage and that is the last decimal point you are going to find in this tribute.
SPORTS
October 9, 2010 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sky was so clear and the downtown skyline so vivid Friday afternoon that from Citizens Bank Park's upper deck you could see Billy Penn's scroll. What is it, by the way, about statues of Philly icons and cylindrical rolls of paper? Outside the ballpark, Connie Mack was clutching a rolled-up scorecard. Is there a bronzed likeness somewhere of Frank Rizzo delivering an Evening Bulletin? Anyway, in this perfect autumn weather, the ballpark looked so good that it brought to mind Philadelphia's venue for the last postseason series involving the Phillies and Reds, Veterans Stadium.
SPORTS
October 22, 2008 | By Peter Pascarelli FOR THE INQUIRER
1988: It seemed like a different manager was in place every few months to oversee the mess. John Felske was canned in late 1987, replaced by local favorite Lee Elia, who would be fired in September 1988. Elia was replaced for the final nine games by interim manager John Vukovich, who should have been given the chance to do the job on a full-time basis. However, a new GM had arrived in the person of Lee Thomas, who wanted his own man in the job. So a fourth manager in the space of 16 months was hired after the season when Thomas brought Cardinals coach Nick Leyva to Philadelphia.
SPORTS
October 22, 2008 | By Peter Pascarelli FOR THE INQUIRER
1985: The love affair between fans and the Phillies that had begun in the glory years of the mid 1970s was officially ruptured during the course of a miserable 75-87 season. Attendance fell to the lowest levels in years, amid growing dissatisfaction with conditions at Veterans Stadium. On the field, the ruling junta known as the Gang of Six decreed that manager John Felske shift eventual Hall of Fame third baseman Mike Schmidt to first in order to make room for prospect Rick Schu, who never panned out. Schmidt complained in late summer about the negative fans, the awful artificial turf at the Vet, and memorably, the "smell of cat urine in the home dugout.
SPORTS
June 19, 2003 | By Michael D. Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
During Veterans Stadium's final season, The Inquirer will look back weekly at memorable Phillies moments. The Phillies fans shuffling into Veterans Stadium that Tuesday evening in June had little more to expect than mediocrity. What they got was A Midsummer Night's Dream, baseball-style. Because what happened at the concrete doughnut on June 11, 1985, had to be magic. The baseball gods must have muttered, "What fools these Phillies fans be" and decided to have a little fun. How else do you explain a 26-7 victory - one of the most lopsided in baseball history - by a team that was 14 games under .500, with a record of 20-34?
SPORTS
November 15, 2001 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphians probably would prefer another year like 1980, when all four of the city's professional teams reached their leagues' championship rounds. But, failing that, having four reigning coach/managers of the year working here simultaneously is certainly a step up from the days of Jerry Williams, Vic Stasiuk, Frank Lucchesi and Poor Roy Rubin. Now that the Phillies' Larry Bowa has been named the National League's best manager in 2001, joining the previously honored Andy Reid, Bill Barber and Larry Brown, Philadelphia enjoys a unique distinction.
NEWS
November 1, 2000
Sports and race Why don't the Phillies give a minority a chance to manage their pathetic team? Can they do any worse than Terry Francona, John Felske or Jim Fregosi? They can play for your team but can't get an opportunity to manage it. Front offices have an old-boy mentality in management hiring. LANIE L. BRADFORD, Philadelphia Paul Domowitch's Eagles Playbook (Oct. 20) is typical of the arrogant white media in this town, regarding Randall Cunningham. Keep your backhanded compliments.
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