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John Gotti

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LIVING
September 24, 1998 | By W. Speers This story contains material from the Associated Press, Reuters, New York Daily News, New York Post, Playbill and Daily Mirror
Imprisoned New York mob boss John Gotti has throat cancer and will undergo surgery soon, his lawyer Bruce Cutler said yesterday. He called the condition "serious, it's life-threatening," but added: "Everyone feels he's going to lick this. " Cutler noted that docs "feel it's treatable, and they're optimistic. " They found a tumor at the back of his throat near his tonsils and lymph nodes. "As I understand it, it was cancer of the tonsils and then metastasized," Cutler said. "It's been difficult to get precise information from prison authorities.
NEWS
July 26, 1994 | by Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer
George Martorano, the son of mobster Raymond "Long John" Martorano, was in his cell one night when a guard stopped by with a new cellmate. "Here's the boss of all bosses standing in my doorway," Martorano recalled. "John Gotti walks in with a bedroll. I say, 'You're the guy who's on TV.' " That was how Gotti, then in a highly publicized federal trial, became Martorano's "cellie" at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in Manhattan in 1986. Martorano, now serving a life-without-parole sentence in federal prison in Marianna, Fla., recently recalled living with Gotti and other mob bosses.
NEWS
October 22, 1993 | By CALVIN TRILLIN
Michael Milken, the junk-bond wizard and thief, is now a popular lecturer at the business school of the University of California at Los Angeles. This can be seen as good news for Leona Helmsley, who would presumably be UCLA's idea of an appropriate professor of Real Estate Tax Practices, as soon as she finishes up at the half-way house. Is Jim Bakker available to teach a UCLA School of Religion course called "Church Management 101: Imaginative Ideas in Religious Fund Raising"? Or is he still in the slammer?
NEWS
April 30, 1992 | By GEORGE W. KNOX
The resounding guilty verdict in the trial of John Gotti has prompted a flurry of obituaries noting the death of organized crime. True, with this modern-day "godfather" off the streets and behind bars, the Gambino crime family has been dealt a serious blow. But those who believe that Gotti's conviction signals the end of the mob in New York or anywhere else are deceiving themselves. The history of organized crime in the United States shows, if nothing else, tough resilience. This can be seen in the Mafia's ability to modify its management style to accommodate increasing legal pressures.
NEWS
December 21, 1992 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One defendant was involved in a barroom brawl with an off-duty state trooper and showed up in court the next day in a bloodied shirt and handcuffs. Another collapsed at the defense table with what appeared to be a heart attack. The state's star witness traded curses and epithets from the witness stand with the lead defense attorney. And a celebrity gangster who was expected to testify was never called. Through stops and starts, mistrial motions and time-consuming legal arguments, the racketeering trial of reputed mob leader Robert "Bobby Cabert" Bisaccia and six co-defendants has bounced along in a ninth-floor courtroom of the Essex County Superior Court here for the last six months.
NEWS
May 26, 1992 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Daniel J. Marino, mentioned in some law enforcement circles as a possible successor to John Gotti as head of New York's biggest mob family, has a date tomorrow with New Jersey casino regulators. Marino, 52, is scheduled to appear at an administrative hearing in Atlantic City to respond to a petition that would permanently bar him from the state's casinos as an undesirable. "Frankly, I'd be surprised if he shows up," said one law enforcement source last week. "He doesn't need this kind of attention.
NEWS
May 1, 1990 | By George Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Gotti's son, John A. "Junior" Gotti, was married two weeks ago, and the New York tabloids went crazy. Blaring headlines and breathless stories were built around bits and pieces of information - some factual, some little more than gossip - about the 26-year-old bridegroom and his 21-year-old bride. There was even more about the wedding reception, a splashy affair at the Helmsley Palace in Manhattan, where, it was later reported, 240 guests were served tenderloin of beef, stuffed veal loin, pasta, shrimp, seared medallions of veal and lobster, mousse and fresh fruit.
NEWS
October 27, 2009 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
South Philadelphia mob associate John "Johnny Gongs" Casasanto was angling to join New York's Gambino crime family in 2002, but a bullet to the back of the head short-circuited that career move. None other than John Gotti Jr. backed Casasanto, 35, who hoped to get "straightened out" - formally initiated - after befriending the mob boss while they were inmates in a federal detention center in New York state, according to a key government witness. The Casasanto-Gotti connection has been described by mob informant John Alite, the prosecution's star witness in the ongoing racketeering trial of Gotti Jr. in federal court in New York City.
NEWS
April 15, 1992 | by Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer
Some observers are calling it the Black Gotti Trial. Like the recently concluded marathon trial of flamboyant New York Mafia boss John Gotti and co-defendant Frank Locascio in Brooklyn, the federal court trial here of three Junior Black Mafia members has been replete with murder plots, organization charts and sometimes fascinating details about the lifestyles of the rich and infamous. And like the New York trial, the sideshow here - the family and friends of the defendants and the court watchers and merely curious - has at times been as interesting as the testimony.
NEWS
February 4, 1992 | Compiled from Daily News wire service reports
NEW YORK GOTTI PREDICTS ACQUITTAL John Gotti, reputed head of the Gambino crime family, confidently predicted during a break in his racketeering trial yesterday he will be acquitted. Gotti, 51, also complained to co-defendant and alleged Gambino underboss Frank Locascio, 59, about prosecutor John Gleeson's single-minded determination to put both of them in jail for life. Said Gotti of Gleeson: "This guy, you know what he says to his wife when he gets up in the morning?
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NEWS
April 2, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
ROBERT KUSHNER told a federal jury yesterday that back in 2007, he was a Lower Merion High School and George Washington University graduate who was selling marijuana when cops robbed him of $110,000, including money he kept in his apartment safe. Kushner, 32, now a basketball coach, said he was driving on Ridge Avenue in the city about 7:30 p.m. Oct. 16, 2007, when an unmarked police Ford Expedition signaled for him to pull over with a blue siren on its dashboard. After he stopped his car, Kushner said, Officer Brian Reynolds came out of the SUV with "his gun pointed at me," pulled me out "and put me in handcuffs.
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
"ROB the Mob" is an intriguing little indie about a New York "Bonnie and Clyde" who had an understandably brief career knocking down mafia social clubs, circa 1992. Theirs was a very bad business plan, but in "Rob the Mob" it acquires a certain appeal - their victims are so deserving, their demeanor so pleasant, their methods so amateurish, that the doomed enterprise (in the hands of "City Lights" director Raymond De Felitta) takes on an agreeably quixotic tone. Tommy (Michael Pitt)
NEWS
July 26, 2013 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER TV CRITIC
A gritty six-part series, Inside the American Mob chronicles the decline and fall of the Mafia from its apex of power and influence in the '70s to its virtual dismantlement two decades later. As the rub-out begins (with back-to-back episodes), the New York-based Five Families - Gambino, Colombo, Genovese, Lucchese and Bonanno - have a vise-grip on their far-flung criminal enterprises. They use an organizational template devised by Mob architect Lucky Luciano back in 1931.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2012 | By Dan Gross
CONGRATULATIONS TO Ryan Howard and Krystle Campbell , who were married Saturday in Maui. Not surprisingly, the Flyin' Hawaiian Shane Victorino attended the wedding, as did Ben Francisco and many of Howard's Phillies teammates. Howard and Campbell, a schoolteacher and former Eagles cheerleader, announced their engagement in April 2011. She was seen in August on TLC's "Say Yes to the Dress," which showed Campbell dress shopping at Kleinfeld's Bridal in New York. The couple had registered online at Macy's, where the most expensive items are Swarovski crystal toasting flutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2011 | By Dan Gross
NOT TO BE outdone by former mob boss Ralph Natale , who is working on a memoir, it turns out that Joey Merlino , who was just released from a Florida halfway house and whom Natale testified against, has been talking to veteran actor and screenwriter Leo Rossi about writing a movie about his life. On Friday, Northeast native Rossi confirmed that he has had six phone conversations with Merlino, who he says "has got a great sense of humor. " Rossi says that he and Merlino are both trying to line up financing for a possible biopic about the jailed mob boss.
NEWS
April 23, 2011 | Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - Lindsay Lohan was led from a Los Angeles courtroom yesterday by several bailiffs after a judge who heard evidence against her in a theft case sentenced her to 120 days in jail for a probation violation. Lohan's attorney, Shawn Holley, said she will appeal the ruling, which will allow the actress to post bail, which was set at $75,000. The "Mean Girls" star also was ordered to serve more than 400 hours of community service, including 300 hours at a women's center. It will be Lohan's fourth jail stint.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2011 | By FRAZIER MOORE, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Meet four women with family problems: Renee Graziano's dad is Anthony Graziano, who is a high-ranking member of the mob, feds say, and is serving time for racketeering. Her ex-husband has also had a scrape with the law on a gambling charge. Drita D'avanzo is the wife of Lee D'avanzo, the alleged leader of a Bonanno and Colombo crime family team who has been incarcerated for bank robbery - twice - spanning most of their married life. Carla Facciolo's father went to prison when she was a girl.
NEWS
April 10, 2011
Bosko Radonjic, 67, a Serbian nationalist emigre who participated in the bombing of a Yugoslav diplomat's home in suburban Chicago in 1975 and who later became an associate of the Gambino crime family boss John Gotti, died March 31 in Belgrade, Serbia. Radonjic was one of six Serbs who were convicted or pleaded guilty in 1979 in the bombing of the Yugoslav consul's home four years earlier, as well as a plot to bomb a Yugoslav club in Chicago. Like the others, Radonjic was said to have been motivated by hatred for the Yugoslav dictator Josip Broz Tito and his communist government.
NEWS
October 27, 2009 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
South Philadelphia mob associate John "Johnny Gongs" Casasanto was angling to join New York's Gambino crime family in 2002, but a bullet to the back of the head short-circuited that career move. None other than John Gotti Jr. backed Casasanto, 35, who hoped to get "straightened out" - formally initiated - after befriending the mob boss while they were inmates in a federal detention center in New York state, according to a key government witness. The Casasanto-Gotti connection has been described by mob informant John Alite, the prosecution's star witness in the ongoing racketeering trial of Gotti Jr. in federal court in New York City.
NEWS
April 5, 2009 | By George Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a wiseguy lesson in street-corner economics, a how-to-succeed-in-business speech that you won't hear at the Wharton School. Reputed mob soldier Anthony Nicodemo was explaining about the "sharks" and the "lions" and the "lambs" to bookmaker Andrew Micali, who was running an illegal multimillion-dollar sports-betting operation out of the poker room of the Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa in Atlantic City. Nicodemo, 36, "exercised leadership authority" over the $60 million betting enterprise, according to New Jersey authorities who used the secretly recorded 13-minute conversation to support that allegation in a gambling indictment.
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