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John Henry

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SPORTS
August 13, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
A leg injury has ended the comeback try by 11-year-old John Henry, thoroughbred racing's all-time earnings leader, the gelding's trainer said yesterday. "We've decided to call it quits," Ron McAnally said. The announcement came a day after a veterinarian diagnosed John Henry's injury as strained ligaments in the left foreleg and recommended an immediate halt to the horse's training program. The horse was being pointed toward a September start, probably the Sept. 4 Ballantine Classic at the Meadowlands, a race John Henry won in 1984 in what proved to be the gelding's final outing.
NEWS
November 10, 2009 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
The refrain "A man ain't nothin' but a man" shows up in several variations of John Henry's legend. It's also the theme of Iron Age Theatre's world premiere of Chris Braak's The Life of John Henry. Maybe you remember Henry as the steel-driving man who heroically outpaced a steam drill. Maybe you remember that he was a free man, former slave, or convict; that he dug through a mountain or laid down track; that he had a pretty wife who stayed true and wore blue, or that she wore blue, but wasn't true.
NEWS
October 8, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
When H. John Henry was a boy in Erie, Pa., his family owned an ice-cream shop. "My father made all the ice cream, and it was all great," the Camden resident, 80, recalls. "One day I'd have some vanilla, and the next day, maybe I'd have some maple walnut. That's kind of what my life has been. A taste of this, a taste of that. " That's not the half of it. Henry graduated from Penn, served in the Air Force, and sold Bibles door-to-door before becoming active in downtown Camden's artsy community of the late 1960s.
SPORTS
October 1, 2011 | Associated Press
BOSTON - The Terry Francona era in Boston is over. Citing the team's recent collapse, the Red Sox announced Friday that they will not pick up the option on Francona's contract. In a statement, team owners John Henry, Tom Werner, and Larry Lucchino said that a change was needed, and thanked Francona, who led the franchise to two world titles. Francona was ready to head in a different direction. "After many conversations [with the owners] and much consideration, I ultimately felt that, out of respect to this team, it was time for me to move on," Francona said.
NEWS
September 20, 2005 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
After The Member of the Wedding was well-received as a novel in 1945, Carson McCullers transformed it into a play, where her story of a small-town Southern girl and her beloved African American maid was a hit of the 1950 Broadway season. Although the popularity of the novel has endured, the play is not frequently produced - and for good reason. As director Abigail Adams has said of the current revival at People's Light & Theatre Company, the play can't be done without good performers in the roles of the girl Frankie, the maid, Berenice, and Frankie's 6-year-old cousin, John Henry.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1988 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
In its publicity for The Member of the Wedding, Villanova Theater lists the professional productions of the play that have appeared in Philadelphia since the pre-Broadway premiere at the Forrest Theater in 1949. The press release would seem to be placing the current Villanova show in a league with those professional versions - more than a bit presumptuous. The Villanova production is cast with graduate students, and it is a graduate- student-quality production: a competent version of a play that requires high-caliber performers to realize its potential.
SPORTS
February 19, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
Red Sox owner John Henry thinks a salary cap could be good for baseball after watching the rival Yankees trade for Alex Rodriguez - a deal his own franchise could not complete. Henry, whose team failed to obtain Rodriguez from Texas in December, said in an e-mail response to reporters yesterday that he is changing his mind on whether the sport needs a salary cap "to deal with a team that has gone so insanely far beyond the resources of all the other teams. " Yankees owner George Steinbrenner quickly responded, saying: "We understand that John Henry must be embarrassed, frustrated and disappointed by his failure in this transaction.
SPORTS
August 9, 2002 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The Seattle Mariners, who didn't make a major deal before last week's deadline for trades without waivers, yesterday acquired infielder Jose Offerman from the Boston Red Sox. Offerman, 33, was designated for assignment by the Red Sox last week, and refused to report to triple-A Pawtucket, his right as a veteran player. "He was designated for assignment about seven days ago. He cleared waivers this morning and he was assigned over to us about an hour later," Mariners general manager Pat Gillick said.
NEWS
April 19, 1992 | By Edward Ohlbaum, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Two things will have to happen before Upper Makefield officials resolve a dispute involving a bottled-water business in Washington Crossing. Residents who have complained about noise will have to say in writing whether they accept relief promised by the company. And the company will have to submit results of a hydrogeological survey completed last week. The company president, John Henry, said the survey showed that it was not drawing water from the same source as its neighbors' wells.
SPORTS
September 11, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
A painful summer of baseball in South Florida got a huge dose of hope yesterday when commodities trader John Henry said he had struck a deal with Marlins owner H. Wayne Huizenga to buy the struggling franchise for $150 million, the Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel reported. "By the year 2000, the Marlins should gel into a very exciting team," Henry, 48, of Boca Raton, said on a day in which last year's World Series champs lost their 99th game. Henry said he has a handshake agreement with Huizenga's first-in-command, Huizenga Holdings president Rick Rochon, to assume control of the 6-year-old team by Oct. 31 - the end of the team's budget year.
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NEWS
October 8, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
When H. John Henry was a boy in Erie, Pa., his family owned an ice-cream shop. "My father made all the ice cream, and it was all great," the Camden resident, 80, recalls. "One day I'd have some vanilla, and the next day, maybe I'd have some maple walnut. That's kind of what my life has been. A taste of this, a taste of that. " That's not the half of it. Henry graduated from Penn, served in the Air Force, and sold Bibles door-to-door before becoming active in downtown Camden's artsy community of the late 1960s.
NEWS
October 18, 2013 | By Megan Lydon, Inquirer Staff Writer
John J. McHenry Sr., 93, who saw action as a Marine in the Pacific during World War II and later owned a real estate and accounting business in Newtown Square, died Sunday, Oct. 13, from pneumonia at Lima Estates in Media, where he had been living for the last four years. Mr. McHenry, known as "Jack," was born in Southwest Philadelphia, and attended St. Joseph's Prep and University. He married Catherine Ludlow, whom he met at a high school dance, one month before deploying. He promised to return, his family said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2013 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writer mccutch@phillynews.com, 215-854-5991
WHEN JERRY Pinkney was a boy growing up in Germantown, he and his siblings drew on their bedroom wall. When the kids' artwork filled the space, "My father would simply paint over it, and we'd start over again," said Pinkney. Sound like James H. and Willie Mae Pinkney were permissive parents? Nope. More like prescient. Today, Jerry Pinkney, 73, is one of our country's foremost illustrators, especially of children's books. He's painted pioneering reinterpretations of the Tales of Uncle Remus and John Henry . He's masterfully retold Aesop's fables, Bible stories, and real and fictional tales of African-American families, from slavery through today.
SPORTS
October 1, 2011 | Associated Press
BOSTON - The Terry Francona era in Boston is over. Citing the team's recent collapse, the Red Sox announced Friday that they will not pick up the option on Francona's contract. In a statement, team owners John Henry, Tom Werner, and Larry Lucchino said that a change was needed, and thanked Francona, who led the franchise to two world titles. Francona was ready to head in a different direction. "After many conversations [with the owners] and much consideration, I ultimately felt that, out of respect to this team, it was time for me to move on," Francona said.
SPORTS
September 30, 2011 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
IT WAS the mourning after in Boston and Atlanta yesterday. The Red Sox blew a nine-game lead in the wild-card race and were passed by Tampa Bay's dramatic rally against the Yankees on the final night of the regular season. The Braves saw a 10 1/2-game wild-card lead over St. Louis go up in smoke. At a somber Fenway Park, general manager Theo Epstein told reporters that the entire organization shared the blame and promised his full effort in figuring out what went wrong. "The bottom line is, we failed.
NEWS
November 10, 2009 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
The refrain "A man ain't nothin' but a man" shows up in several variations of John Henry's legend. It's also the theme of Iron Age Theatre's world premiere of Chris Braak's The Life of John Henry. Maybe you remember Henry as the steel-driving man who heroically outpaced a steam drill. Maybe you remember that he was a free man, former slave, or convict; that he dug through a mountain or laid down track; that he had a pretty wife who stayed true and wore blue, or that she wore blue, but wasn't true.
SPORTS
February 19, 2008 | Daily News Wire Services
Curt Schilling finally faced reporters yesterday - and an uncertain future. If the shoulder rehabilitation he reluctantly agreed to fails, he knows his brilliant career could be over. The one-time Red Sox ace also denied that he was hurt when he signed an $8 million contract last November. Speaking publicly for the first time about his preference for surgery, Boston's 41-year-old righthander said he had to follow the team's insistence on rehab because he is under contract.
NEWS
September 20, 2005 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
After The Member of the Wedding was well-received as a novel in 1945, Carson McCullers transformed it into a play, where her story of a small-town Southern girl and her beloved African American maid was a hit of the 1950 Broadway season. Although the popularity of the novel has endured, the play is not frequently produced - and for good reason. As director Abigail Adams has said of the current revival at People's Light & Theatre Company, the play can't be done without good performers in the roles of the girl Frankie, the maid, Berenice, and Frankie's 6-year-old cousin, John Henry.
SPORTS
February 23, 2004 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Joachim Johansson harnessed his powerful serve in winning his first ATP title yesterday, beating Nicolas Kiefer in the final of the Kroger St. Jude tournament in Memphis, Tenn. The 21-year-old Swede faced just one break point and beat Kiefer, 7-6 (5), 6-3, in just 94 minutes. Johansson routinely hit 137 m.p.h. on his serves, and even 130 on some second serves. He was never broken in 55 service games in the tournament. Top-seeded Guillermo Coria defeated defending champion Carlos Moya, 6-4, 6-1, to win the ATP Buenos Aires tournament in Argentina.
SPORTS
February 21, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
Was Red Sox owner John Henry's condemnation of the Yankees' spending habits a classic case of the pot calling the kettle, er, red? Curt Schilling didn't quite call the Red Sox owner a hypocrite, but intimated that Henry's comments were out of line. "We're sitting on about a $130 million payroll here," the righthander said yesterday from Boston's spring training camp in Fort Myers, Fla., "so to [whine] and moan about somebody spending a lot of money for their team is kind of . . . " His voice trailed off as he thought better of finishing the thought.
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