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John Hughes

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2011 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
TOPHER GRACE, that '70s guy, becomes that '80s guy in "Take Me Home Tonight. " It's based on Grace's original story about a guy who, at the tail-end of the decade, finds himself with an MIT degree and a Wall Street job offer. He also finds himself in a state of panic - he's unsure of what he wants and bides his time working in a video store. He's a real guy with real postadolescent issues, and though the movie gets broad and goofy at times, it works hard not to be another Reagan-era spoof.
NEWS
July 19, 1991 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
There should be a limit on the number of times a filmmaker can use holiday reunions as the basis for a movie. Two times, maybe three at the most. By any reasonable standard, John Hughes has gone over the limit. "Planes, Trains and Automobiles," "National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation" and "Home Alone" - that's it. He's flagged. He should either quit making them or pay royalties to Earl Hamner Jr. Hamner, author of "The Homecoming," would receive a handsome payoff from Hughes' latest, "Dutch," which is basically a remake of "Planes, Trains and Automobiles.
NEWS
March 1, 1996 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John A. Hughes, 51, of Narberth, a retired Lower Merion police officer, died of cancer Tuesday at his home. Mr. Hughes was a member of the Lower Merion Police Department for 27 years, and since 1977 had been assigned to the police traffic safety unit. He retired in June. As a traffic safety officer, he assisted in traffic studies, handled requests about setting and posting speed limits, supervised the township's nine school crossing guards, and presented child safety programs annually at public and private schools in the township.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1986 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Hughes had a problem. Make that several problems. These problems were also known as screenplays, and the trouble with them was that Hughes - a prolific fellow who has had 10 scripts produced in five years in Hollywood - cranks out screenplays faster than it's humanly possible to film them. As it was, he was making pictures in less time than it takes most studio moguls to eat lunch: A scant two years ago, Hughes made his directorial debut with his screenplay of Sixteen Candles, the romantic teen comedy starring Molly Ringwald and Anthony Michael Hall.
NEWS
August 7, 2009 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
John Hughes, 59, creator of such defining 1980s teen comedies as The Breakfast Club and Ferris Bueller's Day Off, and den father to the actors known as the Brat Pack, died of a heart attack yesterday while walking in Manhattan. Mr. Hughes' most commercially successful movie was Home Alone (1990) - with Macaulay Culkin as the unchaperoned 8-year-old who outwits burglars - which the filmmaker wrote and produced. Its $286 million in U.S. box office makes it the top-grossing live-action comedy.
NEWS
February 10, 1988 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
It can now be revealed: John Hughes, the man who in a few short years brought the world an oeuvre of achingly hip movies about the traumas of teenagedom - Pretty in Pink, The Breakfast Club, Ferris Bueller's Day Off, Sixteen Candles, Some Kind of Wonderful - is actually a quintessentially old- fashioned, Square Joe kind of guy. Sure, his prom-world pictures sport sound tracks from the latest Anglo/ synth-pop/haircut bands. His pack of teen-troupers (OK, some of them are in their 20s now)
NEWS
December 11, 1996 | For The Inquirer / BOB HILL
Call it his branch office. John Hughes hauls a Christmas tree to a customer's car. Hughes sells Douglas firs (at a timely $19.96 each) from his home on Route 49 in Quinton Township, Salem County.
NEWS
July 1, 1994 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Many people have noticed that John Hughes, writer and producer of "Baby's Day Out," is regressing to infancy. He started out making movies about teen-agers ("The Breakfast Club"), then younger teen-agers ("Sixteen Candles," "Pretty in Pink"), then children ("Home Alone" and its sequel), and now, a crawling infant. "Baby's Day Out" is one long slapstick romp, following a wee one, Baby Bink, as he leads three dumb-guy criminals - his would-be kidnappers - on a chase through the streets of Chicago.
NEWS
June 17, 1988 | By DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer
"The Great Outdoors" is 90 minutes of unfunny gags written by John Hughes and starring John Candy and Dan Aykroyd. Who are these people? John Candy is a walking fat joke who has built an entire career on his girth. The joke wasn't funny to begin with and has grown progressively less funny with every stupid picture he has made. Dan Aykroyd, who is quickly moving up to Candy's major league lard level, does a fast-talk schtick that has worked in limited doses (see "Ghostbusters")
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1995 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The name is Mrs. John Hughes. Very proper-sounding. Actually an anachronism in this day and age when women insist on their own identity. Mrs. John Hughes indeed. As one might expect, she looks like the pleasant, kindly woman we would all like to have living next door. Perhaps a favorite aunt. Or a loving grandmother, which she happens to be. So what is Mrs. John Hughes doing performing in a casino showroom, being more than a little naughty, telling jokes that are sometimes on the risque side?
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 18, 2012
With the big holiday coming up Thursday, match the Thanksgiving - or Thanksgiving-themed - story or poem with its author, the song with its singer, or the film or television program with its director. Answers on C3 . 1. "Alice's Restaurant. " 2. A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving . 3. "The Courtship of Miles Standish. " 4. Hannah and Her Sisters . 5. Home for the Holidays . 6. "It's Thanksgiving. " 7. "My Triumph. " 8. Planes, Trains & Automobiles . 9. "Thanksgiving Song.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2011 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
TOPHER GRACE, that '70s guy, becomes that '80s guy in "Take Me Home Tonight. " It's based on Grace's original story about a guy who, at the tail-end of the decade, finds himself with an MIT degree and a Wall Street job offer. He also finds himself in a state of panic - he's unsure of what he wants and bides his time working in a video store. He's a real guy with real postadolescent issues, and though the movie gets broad and goofy at times, it works hard not to be another Reagan-era spoof.
NEWS
August 7, 2009 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
John Hughes, 59, creator of such defining 1980s teen comedies as The Breakfast Club and Ferris Bueller's Day Off, and den father to the actors known as the Brat Pack, died of a heart attack yesterday while walking in Manhattan. Mr. Hughes' most commercially successful movie was Home Alone (1990) - with Macaulay Culkin as the unchaperoned 8-year-old who outwits burglars - which the filmmaker wrote and produced. Its $286 million in U.S. box office makes it the top-grossing live-action comedy.
SPORTS
January 16, 2008 | By Keith Pompey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For Samuel Starks, every game is personal. The Mariana Bracetti Charter point guard wants to prove that he's just as good as the rest of Southeastern Pennsylvania's premier players. "Sometimes, people I know at the bigger schools get the exposure," Starks said. "I want that, too. " The recognition will come if Starks continues to have games similar to the one he had yesterday. Behind his 32-point performance, the Bulldogs defeated the Bodine Ambassadors, 61-54, in a Public League D Division first-place game at Bracetti.
NEWS
February 16, 2005 | By Adam Fifield INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
BP yesterday appealed a ruling by Delaware's environmental secretary that could block the oil giant from building a liquefied natural gas facility on the Delaware River shore in Gloucester County. On Feb. 3, John Hughes, secretary of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control, said a 1,900-foot off-loading pier planned for the facility in Logan Township would extend into Delaware waters and was barred by his state's Coastal Zone Act. The act was established in 1971 to protect Delaware's coast from the effects of heavy industry and bulk-transfer facilities.
NEWS
February 9, 2005 | By Adam Fifield INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Watch out, Delaware. You may be in for a dose of "Jersey justice. " Calling a ruling by Delaware's environmental secretary on a proposed natural-gas terminal an "act of aggression" against the State of New Jersey, Assemblyman John Burzichelli (D., Gloucester) yesterday called on Garden State residents to boycott credit cards issued by banks based in Delaware. "It's payback time," Burzichelli said in a statement. "We need to exact some Jersey justice on these characters who think nothing about meddling in our affairs.
NEWS
April 14, 2002 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fiona Havlish was on the phone making plans with Ellen Saracini to go to a ball game when another call came in. The neighbors from Lower Makefield, Bucks County, had turned from strangers to confidantes in the months after Sept. 11. Ellen's husband was pilot of the plane that crashed into the South Tower of the World Trade Center, where Fiona's husband was killed trying to escape the 101st floor. "Let me get that," Fiona told Ellen that morning on April 4. "I'll call you back.
SPORTS
October 30, 1998 | By Scott Brown, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Two days before Halloween, Delran complained of being tricked in a last-second loss at the South Jersey Coaches Tournament. With just 41 seconds remaining, Lenape's Mike Johnston slipped behind the Delran defense, took a long pass, and slotted the ball past the Delran goalie for a 2-1 soccer victory yesterday. Losing was no treat for Delran coach John Hughes. "I don't think [Johnston] was offside," he said. "I know he was offside. Poor call, and it cost us the game. " When asked about the game-winning goal, Lenape coach Jack Earl allowed a small grin and said, "I just saw [Johnston]
SPORTS
September 17, 1998 | By Marc Narducci, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
John Hughes insists that this will be his final year as the Delran boys' soccer coach. Again. Others hope he changes his mind. Again. A few years ago, Hughes was ready to resign, but after an outpouring of support from players and parents, he changed his mind. This spring, he went one step further. Hughes actually submitted a letter of resignation to the school. Again, the phone rang constantly with pleas that he reconsider. He did, but Hughes, who has been coaching organized soccer for 49 years and says he is "over 50," vows that this will be his last season.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1997 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Between all the punches and pratfalls, the Home Alone series tells children that adults come in two categories: dumb and dumber. The very existence of Home Alone 3 should persuade any kid who remains doubtful. This is a movie to make Macaulay Culkin glad he's a teenager and too old to take the lead in a tired and relentlessly unimaginative recycling of the premise of the two predecessors. The main difference is that the jokes are a litle meaner and the comeuppance meted out by the kid to the visiting villains is noticeably nastier.
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