CollectionsJohn James Audubon
IN THE NEWS

John James Audubon

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 23, 1999 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
John James Audubon came to the United States to dodge the draft. And in the three years he lived at Mill Grove in Montgomery County, he found his lifelong love and perfected a hobby that years later would make him America's most famous avian artist and first birder. Mill Grove and Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary, now owned by the county, will hold a free celebration of its most famous resident's 214th birthday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. tomorrow. The party will include a cake, a native plant and bake sale, guided walks, and storytelling.
NEWS
January 30, 2005 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For a little less than three years, John James Audubon was a resident of Mill Grove in Montgomery County. There he developed the skills that made him a master painter of birds. He also found the love of his life, and began the journey that transformed him from a man without a country to an American. These are some of the major themes Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Richard Rhodes developed in his new biography, John James Audubon: The Making of an American. Audubon was born in 1785 on the island of Saint-Domingue, the present-day Haiti.
NEWS
November 20, 2005 | Inquirer suburban staff
What there is to see: The property contains a 1762 stone house, a bank barn, and 67 acres of open space. Visitors will learn about the life of celebrated bird expert John James Audubon as they stroll through the house and grounds. Interpretive vignettes depict his work studios. Mounted birds and mammals offer visitors a glimpse of the creatures Audubon studied and painted. Standout pieces include The Eagle and the Lamb, a painting Audubon did to pay for the production of his famous book, Birds of America.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2011 | BY JESSE SMITH, For the Daily News
IN THE SPRING of 1824, John James Audubon arrived in Philadelphia. He came from New Orleans in search of a publisher for his illustrations of America's birds. The artist found fans in the city, but no engraver willing to undertake the project. Audubon had also been nominated for membership in the Academy of Natural Sciences, the nation's pre-eminent scientific body of the time. He was rejected. What a difference 183 years make. Audubon eventually found a publisher in Europe, and the drawings he brought to Philadelphia were collected as The Birds of America . These images are now among the most famous and valuable works of American art. Today, The Birds of America , bound in five volumes, occupies a prominent place in the academy's library as one of fewer than 120 intact editions that remain from the original 200 Audubon made.
NEWS
August 22, 1990 | By George Papajohn, Chicago Tribune Inquirer staff writer Leonard Boasberg contributed to this article
A Chicago art dealer in possession of about 40 stolen Audubon bird prints has agreed to return the artworks to the Louisiana State Museum in New Orleans. The prints would be the first of 60 works by John James Audubon, allegedly stolen by a museum volunteer, to be returned as part of delicate negotiations between dealers and the Louisiana attorney general's office, which represents the museum. Louisiana State Police allege that Michael Moskaluk stole the Audubons, whose worth is estimated at between $750,000 and $1.5 million, and 40 other artworks from the museum in late 1989 and then sold them to dealers in Chicago, Montreal, New York, Philadelphia and France between December and March.
NEWS
March 17, 2009 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He was a scientist, gentleman farmer, philanthropist, and founder of a literary society. He was an adventurer and sportsman - and twice accompanied famed painter and fellow ornithologist John James Audubon on expeditions, including a memorable journey up the Missouri River in 1843. Edward Harris Jr. might not be a household name today, but the Moorestown native is well known by town history buffs who see him as their local version of Ben Franklin. Harris' bird collection and journal descriptions of flora and fauna, native American tribesmen, and buffalo hunts paint a vivid picture of 19th-century North America and are still studied by ornithologists, naturalists, and historians.
NEWS
January 29, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
One hundred years ago, a bird named Martha made history with one simple, inevitable act: She died. She was the planet's lone remaining passenger pigeon. Her death on Sept. 1, 1914, marked a rare instance when the exact date of an extinction is known. (Although, in truth, some accounts put her demise a day or two earlier.) How a species that numbered in the billions - once North America's most abundant bird - can disappear in a matter of decades is a sad story of "deliberate, wanton, and direct human actions," said Joel Greenberg, a Chicago author and natural history researcher.
NEWS
June 6, 1993 | By Ralph and Terry Kovel, FOR THE INQUIRER
The light-bulb nose and electric-outlet ears help identify Reddy Kilowatt, the symbol used by many power companies and a trademark figure sought by collectors. Reddy was created by Ashton B. Collins in the late 1920s. Collins, the story goes, saw four flashes of lightning and thought they resembled the arms and legs of a person. More than 200 companies use or have used Reddy Kilowatt in their promotional material. Kites, dolls, posters, pamphlets, signs, cigarette lighters, earrings and tie tacks can be found with the symbol.
NEWS
October 28, 2012 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
As seen in his book, Gomorrah Girl , published by Cross Editions in 2011, Valerio Spada's documentary photographs of adolescents navigating Naples' crime-ridden streets were striking enough to win him Blurb's 2011 Photography Book Now grand prize for best book of the year. As large prints displayed on the walls of the Philadelphia Photo Arts Center, where Spada is exhibiting them for the first time, they're less obviously tied to the book's narrative, which makes them even more powerful.
NEWS
February 13, 2000 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shawneen Finnegan described the sight as simply heartbreaking. There, on the side of a Cape May County roadway, a group of American woodcocks huddled together, dying of cold and starvation. "It was really awful," Finnegan, a professional birder, said of the scene she filmed Jan. 28. "I found two of them leaning up against each other to keep warm, but they were dead. " It's called a "die-off. " It was caused by the recent ice storms and cold snap that turned the ground at the Shore rock hard and kept it that way for days.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2015 | Becky Batcha, Daily News Staff Writer batchab@phillynews.com, 215-854-5757
It's fitting that the Philadelphia Museum of Art should open its new, gorge-your-eyes exhibit on American still life now, as America lays in for Thanksgiving. Ripe abundance and unbridled consumption are two themes in the surprisingly gorgeous feast of American plenty. Posh flowers overspill their vases, mouthwatering fruits overflow their bowls, exotic and domestic animals (including a showstopping house cat) abound. The 175-year retrospective, "Audubon to Warhol: The Art of American Still Life," even starts on a peep-show note, with Philly master Raphaelle Peale's "Venus Rising from the Sea - A Deception.
NEWS
October 23, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Earlier this year, Philadelphia Museum of Art curator Mark Mitchell called art consultant Nan Chisholm to ask a favor: that she persuade a client to lend a painting for "Audubon to Warhol: The Art of American Still Life," the major survey exhibition set to open Tuesday. To add weight to his request, he listed the impressive works he already had secured - particularly those by the Peales, America's first family of still-life painters. There was The Peale Family , a masterpiece begun in 1773 by Charles Willson Peale, patriarch of the Philadelphia clan, and iconic works by sons Rembrandt and Raphaelle.
NEWS
February 24, 2014 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Since seeing Mia Rosenthal's first show of drawings at Gallery Joe two years ago, I've occasionally wondered what she would do for her next solo exhibition there. Would she again develop an idea into one disciplined, project-like body of work, as she had done so nicely in her conceptual revisions of views depicted in well-known Hudson River School paintings? Or would she explore several directions at once, something she seemed eminently capable of doing? It's turned out to be the latter, exhilaratingly so. Rosenthal's familiar crisp, tiny renderings of flora and fauna in black ink on white paper - crowded together, yet each taking up the perfect amount of space; doodlelike, yet orderly - have been deployed in only two drawings in this large show (she has the entire gallery)
NEWS
January 29, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
One hundred years ago, a bird named Martha made history with one simple, inevitable act: She died. She was the planet's lone remaining passenger pigeon. Her death on Sept. 1, 1914, marked a rare instance when the exact date of an extinction is known. (Although, in truth, some accounts put her demise a day or two earlier.) How a species that numbered in the billions - once North America's most abundant bird - can disappear in a matter of decades is a sad story of "deliberate, wanton, and direct human actions," said Joel Greenberg, a Chicago author and natural history researcher.
NEWS
January 27, 2014 | Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Elke M. Shihadeh, 78, of Ardmore, an expert in the art of hand bookbinding and historic-document restoration, died of pneumonia Wednesday, Jan. 15, at home. The former Elke Nissen practiced the highly specialized craft of restoring rare books with her husband, Fred H. Shihadeh, from her early 20s into her 70s. Mrs. Shihadeh had a special expertise in the restoration of damaged papers of historical significance. She personally restored the broadsides announcing the Declaration of Independence.
NEWS
October 28, 2012 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
As seen in his book, Gomorrah Girl , published by Cross Editions in 2011, Valerio Spada's documentary photographs of adolescents navigating Naples' crime-ridden streets were striking enough to win him Blurb's 2011 Photography Book Now grand prize for best book of the year. As large prints displayed on the walls of the Philadelphia Photo Arts Center, where Spada is exhibiting them for the first time, they're less obviously tied to the book's narrative, which makes them even more powerful.
NEWS
November 30, 2011 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
At 3:15 p.m., Bridget Clancy's big moment had come. The librarian slipped on white cotton gloves and eased open the glass lid. Underneath was a massive book that is considered one of the great works of American scientific art, John James Audubon's Birds of America . At the moment, the page showed spotted sandpipers. But a new page was about to be revealed. Buckingham Palace has its changing of the guard. On weekdays, the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University has its turning of the page.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2011
The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University 1900 Benjamin Franklin Parkway 215-299-1000 www.ansp.org Hours: 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. Audubon pages turned at 3:15 p.m. weekdays. Admission: $12; $10 ages 3-12, seniors, college students and military personnel; children under 3, free. Additional $2 for "Butterflies!" John James Audubon Center at Mill Grove 1201 Pawlings Road Audubon, Pa. 610-666-5593, http://pa.audubon.org/ centers_mill_grove.html Hours: Museum, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 1-4 p.m. Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2011 | BY JESSE SMITH, For the Daily News
IN THE SPRING of 1824, John James Audubon arrived in Philadelphia. He came from New Orleans in search of a publisher for his illustrations of America's birds. The artist found fans in the city, but no engraver willing to undertake the project. Audubon had also been nominated for membership in the Academy of Natural Sciences, the nation's pre-eminent scientific body of the time. He was rejected. What a difference 183 years make. Audubon eventually found a publisher in Europe, and the drawings he brought to Philadelphia were collected as The Birds of America . These images are now among the most famous and valuable works of American art. Today, The Birds of America , bound in five volumes, occupies a prominent place in the academy's library as one of fewer than 120 intact editions that remain from the original 200 Audubon made.
NEWS
July 30, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
For more than half a century, scholars and biographers of famed bird artist and ornithologist John James Audubon had been stumped. In an 1824 diary entry, the young French immigrant, who lived for several years at Mill Grove in Montgomery County, mentioned that he had given a drawing of a running grouse to a Philadelphia engraver for use on a New Jersey banknote. It would have been a key moment - the first published illustration for the struggling artist, then 29 years old. But if so, where was it?
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|