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John Marzano

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April 20, 2008 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Paul O'Neill was whining about being knocked down by a pitch. John Marzano told him to shut up, get back in the box, and hit. It was Aug. 28, 1996, but the memory is still fresh. The Yankees were on their way to being swept by the Mariners. It was the eighth inning. I was in the press box at Seattle's Kingdome, beginning to work on a story for the New York Post describing what was about to be a fourth consecutive Yankees loss. Back on the East Coast, the 10-2 defeat surely would bring an angry response from Yankees owner George Steinbrenner.
SPORTS
April 22, 2008 | BY THE INQUIRER STAFF
A funeral Mass for former major-league catcher John Marzano will be held Friday at Annunciation BVM Church, 10th and Dickinson Streets in Philadelphia, with burial to follow at Holy Cross Cemetery in Yeadon. Mr. Marzano, 45, was a former Central High and Temple University star who became a big-league catcher and a sports broadcaster. He died Saturday. Friends may visit Thursday from 5 to 9 p.m. and Friday from 9:15 to 10:15 a.m. at the Baldi/Pennsylvania Funeral Home, Broad and Reed Streets.
SPORTS
May 15, 2008
The cause of death of John Marzano is still unknown, a spokesman for the Medical Examiner's Office said yesterday. More tests have been scheduled and it will take another 8 to 10 weeks before lab results determine the cause of death, spokesman Jeff Moran said. Marzano, 45, a broadcaster and former big-league catcher, was found dead April 19 in his Passayunk Avenue home. "When someone that age dies we want to be certain," Moran said. - Dafney Tales  
SPORTS
July 2, 1987 | By TED SILARY, Daily News Sports Writer
The Daily News today presents a 10-Year All-City Baseball Team, but our search for Player and Pitcher of the span began and ended in '81. High school fans, reacquaint yourselves with Central catcher John Marzano and Penn Charter pitcher Mark Gubicza. Marzano, who started at third base as a sophomore, was a two-time Daily News All-City selection at catcher and our Player of the Year as a senior, when in 21 games he batted .574 with 15 doubles, 7 triples, 6 homers, 54 RBI and a 1.265 slugging percentage.
SPORTS
July 28, 1987 | By TED SILARY, Daily News Sports Writer
When Ed Nottle managed the New Britain (Conn.) Red Sox of the Double A Eastern League in 1985, he was never quite sure what to do with catcher John Marzano. Stick him behind the plate? Or run him up the flagpole? "The first year I knew John," Nottle said one day last week in Pawtucket's McCoy Stadium, where both men now work for the Red Sox's Triple A affiliate, "I was sooo sick of looking at red, white and blue clothes, I actually tried to stay away from him. "I thought he was a flag.
NEWS
February 2, 1988 | By VALERIA M. RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
John A. Marzano, father of Boston Red Sox catcher John Marzano and an officer in the Army Reserves, died Saturday. He was 61 and lived in South Philadelphia. Marzano lived with a dream of seeing his son play in the major leagues. He got to see that dream fulfilled last summer when John was called up from the minors to play for Boston in the last two months of the season. "When I finally made it, he came to the field. He was so happy, it was unreal," John recalled last night.
SPORTS
July 28, 1987 | By TED SILARY, Daily News Sports Writer
When Ed Nottle managed the New Britain (Conn.) Red Sox of the Double A Eastern League in 1985, he was never quite sure what to do with catcher John Marzano. Stick him behind the plate? Or run him up the flagpole? "The first year I knew John," Nottle said one day last week in Pawtucket's McCoy Stadium, where both men now work for the Red Sox's Triple A affiliate, "I was sooo sick of looking at red, white and blue clothes, I actually tried to stay away from him. "I thought he was a flag.
SPORTS
April 17, 1988 | By Angelo Cataldi, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a day right out of a storybook. The sun was glowing in a cloudless sky, the grass was rich and soft and dappled with dew, and the flags framing the outfield were fluttering gently in the breeze. Outside Fenway Park, the sweet smell of grilled peppers and sausage wafted from the vendors' stands down Yawkey Way, as the gates creaked open and the small weekday crowd filed through the turnstiles. Amid these happy trappings, John Marzano sat in the Red Sox dugout behind first base - just a few feet away from a Red Sox lineup card that contained his name, and within earshot of a knot of fans clamoring for his autograph.
SPORTS
May 4, 1993 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
An unemployed baseball player becomes something of an ambulance chaser. He opens his sports section each morning to "Transactions" and checks to see whether someone who plays his position has suffered an injury. In the western suburbs of Boston yesterday, catcher John Marzano, late of the Red Sox, noticed that the Cleveland Indians had placed Sandy Alomar on the 15-day disabled list. "I told my wife, 'Hey, look, a catcher got hurt for Cleveland,' " said Marzano, the former Central High and Temple star.
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December 8, 2013 | BY JOHN MURROW, Daily News Staff Writer murrowj@phillynews.com
ONE MONTH AGO, there was nothing but excitement for Temple baseball coach Ryan Wheeler and his players as the team announced it would play all but one of its 2014 home conference games at Campbell's Field in Camden, home of the Camden Riversharks. That excitement turned into anger yesterday after Temple's Board of Trustees approved a recommendation from athletic director Kevin Clark to eliminate seven intercollegiate sports, including the school's history-rich baseball program. "It was just unbelievable," said Matt Hockenberry, a senior pitcher and team captain.
SPORTS
July 18, 2008 | By Michael Klein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Major-league catcher-turned-broadcaster John Marzano died of "postural asphyxia" sustained in a fall down the steps in his South Philadelphia apartment, the Medical Examiner's Office said yesterday. Jeff Moran, a spokesman for the medical examiner, said blunt-force trauma and ethanol intoxication contributed to Marzano's April 19 death. He did not elaborate. Marzano's widow, Terri, said yesterday she was told by the Medical Examiner's Office that "Johnny Marz," 45, suffered fatal injuries when he fell down the steps of the apartment.
SPORTS
May 15, 2008
The cause of death of John Marzano is still unknown, a spokesman for the Medical Examiner's Office said yesterday. More tests have been scheduled and it will take another 8 to 10 weeks before lab results determine the cause of death, spokesman Jeff Moran said. Marzano, 45, a broadcaster and former big-league catcher, was found dead April 19 in his Passayunk Avenue home. "When someone that age dies we want to be certain," Moran said. - Dafney Tales  
SPORTS
April 22, 2008 | BY THE INQUIRER STAFF
A funeral Mass for former major-league catcher John Marzano will be held Friday at Annunciation BVM Church, 10th and Dickinson Streets in Philadelphia, with burial to follow at Holy Cross Cemetery in Yeadon. Mr. Marzano, 45, was a former Central High and Temple University star who became a big-league catcher and a sports broadcaster. He died Saturday. Friends may visit Thursday from 5 to 9 p.m. and Friday from 9:15 to 10:15 a.m. at the Baldi/Pennsylvania Funeral Home, Broad and Reed Streets.
SPORTS
April 20, 2008 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Paul O'Neill was whining about being knocked down by a pitch. John Marzano told him to shut up, get back in the box, and hit. It was Aug. 28, 1996, but the memory is still fresh. The Yankees were on their way to being swept by the Mariners. It was the eighth inning. I was in the press box at Seattle's Kingdome, beginning to work on a story for the New York Post describing what was about to be a fourth consecutive Yankees loss. Back on the East Coast, the 10-2 defeat surely would bring an angry response from Yankees owner George Steinbrenner.
SPORTS
April 20, 2008 | By Mari A. Schaefer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Marzano, the former Central High School and Temple University star who became a major-league baseball catcher and a sports broadcaster, was found dead yesterday in his Passayunk Avenue home. Police said Marzano, 45, was found in the doorway of the home just before noon by a family member who had called police. Police said there was no indication the death was suspicious. It was not known whether he had fallen or had suffered a heart attack. An autopsy was planned, police said.
SPORTS
August 10, 1995 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
John Marzano now has his eyes on Texas. That's not quite the same as looking longingly to Veterans Stadium, but you won't hear him complaining. Marzano, a catcher out of Central High (class of 1981) and Temple, grew up near 11th and Wharton streets in South Philadelphia and dreamed of earning his way to the Vet after signing a Triple A contract with the Phillies for the 1994 season. But then, serving mostly in a backup role to Mike Lieberthal at Scranton/ Wilkes-Barre, Marzano hit .211 with one homer and 19 RBI in 280 at-bats, also had trouble throwing out runners, and was not re-signed for '95. Instead of the end, that moment signaled a new beginning.
SPORTS
May 4, 1993 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
An unemployed baseball player becomes something of an ambulance chaser. He opens his sports section each morning to "Transactions" and checks to see whether someone who plays his position has suffered an injury. In the western suburbs of Boston yesterday, catcher John Marzano, late of the Red Sox, noticed that the Cleveland Indians had placed Sandy Alomar on the 15-day disabled list. "I told my wife, 'Hey, look, a catcher got hurt for Cleveland,' " said Marzano, the former Central High and Temple star.
SPORTS
April 17, 1988 | By Angelo Cataldi, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a day right out of a storybook. The sun was glowing in a cloudless sky, the grass was rich and soft and dappled with dew, and the flags framing the outfield were fluttering gently in the breeze. Outside Fenway Park, the sweet smell of grilled peppers and sausage wafted from the vendors' stands down Yawkey Way, as the gates creaked open and the small weekday crowd filed through the turnstiles. Amid these happy trappings, John Marzano sat in the Red Sox dugout behind first base - just a few feet away from a Red Sox lineup card that contained his name, and within earshot of a knot of fans clamoring for his autograph.
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