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John Mccain

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NEWS
March 1, 2008
SOME POLITICAL commentators from the extreme right have been critical of John McCain's career success at cooperating with leaders from both parties. To that reasoning, I wonder when intransigence became a badge of honor and collaboration a detriment. Of course, collaboration is essential to governing. It is also part of what has made John McCain an outstanding public servant and formidable presidential candidate. He holds core conservative beliefs, but he also finds common ground across party lines on issues like the environment and ethics reform for the betterment of our nation as a whole.
NEWS
June 19, 2008 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
YOU DON'T hear much about the first Mrs. John McCain, who was from the Philadelphia area. But in light of her recent comments in a U.K. publication, I'm beginning to understand why. Apparently, she's not about to let others use her to beat up on John McCain. I had heard years ago that the senator had been married to a gal from Philadelphia. A couple who listen to my radio program told me they were friends with Carol McCain and had spent time with her and John McCain after his release from the Hanoi Hilton.
NEWS
August 2, 2008
AFTER WHAT seemed like endless weeks of John McCain's whining about Barack Obama's alleged lack of experience in international affairs and complaining that he had not been back to Iraq for a long time, Sen. Obama decided to call his bluff and make the trip. But it would appear that McCain got more than what he bargained for. Obama, all three major networks in tow, met with the prime minister of Afghanistan, then played basketball with U.S. troops. Afterward, he not only met with Iraqi Prime Minister Maliki at his residence, but Obama also got his blessing for his troop-withdrawal program!
NEWS
July 19, 2008
WESLEY CLARK and the Democratic Party should be ashamed of themselves. John McCain didn't just "Ride in a fighter jet" over Vietnam. He flew that fighter jet in a combat mission behind enemy lines over Hanoi. That alone makes him an American hero. He was shot down, captured, was tortured until the North Vietnamese realized his father was an admiral in the U.S. Navy. Then, for propaganda reasons, the North Vietnamese wanted to set him free. He refused to leave his men, and his living hell, for principle - "the first man in first man out. " He showed integrity, courage and patriotism.
NEWS
April 8, 2008 | DEBORAH LEAVY
SOUTH PHILLY can be a dangerous place for politicians. John Kerry's campaign sunk like a greasy cheesesteak when he ordered his with Swiss cheese. Watching his waistline - or his poll numbers - Barack Obama played it safe last week by going to Claudio's and DiBruno's, and Hillary compared herself to Rocky, forgetting that he lost. I'll bet neither candidate has a cheesesteak at Geno's, with its anti-immigrant connotations. Now John McCain has seemingly fallen into a South Philly political pothole.
NEWS
February 25, 2000 | By Larry Eichel
How has John McCain managed to get this far in his quest for the Republican presidential nomination without solid support from rank-and-file Republicans? The Arizona senator has benefitted from the strange rules that govern the nominating process. And he has Democrats to thank, not just those who've been voting for him but those who wrote the rules. What has happened thus far is a classic example of the law that inevitably governs the presidential selection process - The Law of Unintended Consequences.
NEWS
February 25, 2000 | By Trudy Rubin
Remember that pop quiz on foreign policy that George W. Bush flunked? Well, John McCain flunked his own back in December, when he couldn't tell an inquiring reporter the name of the prime minister of Ireland. Undaunted at his memory glitch, the senator rattled off a whole analysis of the peace process in Northern Ireland, complete with names and places. When it comes to foreign policy, McCain definitely trumps George W. on spouting substance. That's true, even though their views aren't far apart.
NEWS
November 1, 2008
Susan Furey Bala Cynwyd Since 9/11 we should have been a country on a solid road to unity, but instead we have been on a rocky road to nowhere because of a Republican president who has divided the country between haves and have-nots, and who has damaged our image in the world. At a time of financial, health-care, environmental, and world crises, the would-be Republican replacement continues the downward spiral, spewing lies, fear, and divisiveness to win an election. It is time to put the people of this country first.
NEWS
January 27, 2008
Sen. John McCain of Arizona is the best Republican candidate for president. Experience? The four-term senator and Vietnam war hero has it all over his opponents. Character? Again, McCain wins hands down. He has consistently taken positions he believes in, without regard to political peril. McCain, 71, has personal bravery, political courage and a confident sense of how he would lead this country. He's the authentic candidate in a field of wannabes and flip-floppers. The Inquirer endorses JOHN McCAIN for president in the Republican primary.
NEWS
July 12, 1995 | By Steven Thomma, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Barry Goldwater, as always, was blunt when he first met an aspiring young politician named John McCain, who hoped someday to replace the conservative icon in the Senate. "You know, John, if I had won the presidential election in '64, you wouldn't have spent all those years in a Vietnam prison," said the man many believed would have been a more aggressive commander in chief than President Lyndon Johnson. "No, Barry, it would have been a Chinese prison," responded the brash McCain.
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NEWS
July 30, 2016
En route to fight one of his many duels, the French politician Georges Clemenceau bought a one-way train ticket. Was he pessimistic? "Not at all. I always use my opponent's return ticket for the trip back. " Some Hillary Clinton advisers, although not that serene, think her victory is probable and can be assured. Her challenge is analogous to Ronald Reagan's in 1980, when voters were even more intensely dissatisfied than they now are. There were hostages in Iran, and stagflation's "misery index" (the sum of the inflation and unemployment rates)
NEWS
July 24, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, Staff Writer
A "divider" like GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump will have a hard time winning Ohio, an important battleground that could help decide the election in November, said Buckeye State Gov. John Kasich, a former Republican presidential candidate. "Ohio's a snapshot of the country. People in Ohio want to see a positive agenda, a positive way to move forward," Kasich said Friday in an interview at the Union League of Philadelphia. He attended a fund-raiser for Brian Fitzpatrick, a Bucks County Republican running for an open congressional seat.
NEWS
July 19, 2016 | By Jonathan Tamari and Maddie Hanna, STAFF WRITERS
WASHINGTON - When quarterback Tim Tebow shot down reports that he'd speak at the Republican convention this week, he became the most unusual big name to skip the Donald Trump show. But he's hardly alone. When the Republican National Convention opens Monday in Cleveland, it will be missing a fleet of the country's most recognizable Republicans, including former presidents, recent presidential nominees, and a chunk of the GOP's congressional roster. With just one exception, every Republican congressman and senator from the Philadelphia area will be somewhere else.
NEWS
June 29, 2016
ISSUE | IMMIGRATION U.S. owes visas to Afghan interpreters Congress and Sen. Mike Lee (R., Utah) in particular should be ashamed. It is a disgrace and breach of a sacred trust to renege on our commitment to provide visas to Afghan interpreters and other aides who risked their lives and face retribution daily for their cooperation with our troops and other personnel. I urge Sens. Jeanne Shaheen (D., N.H.) and John McCain (R., Ariz) to introduce a stand-alone bill to renew and scale up the State Department's Special Immigrant Visas program.
NEWS
May 19, 2016 | By John Baer
WHILE READING Sunday's front-page New York Times piece about Donald Trump's "crossing the line" with women he worked with, dated or casually encountered, I thought, heck, this won't hurt him. Then, by Monday, one of the women, former Trump girlfriend Rowanne Brewer Lane, featured in the piece as objectified by Trump, said the Times misrepresented her, and I thought, whoa, the piece actually helps him. How, you might ask? It displays Trump as the field-playing macho stud he's played for decades.
NEWS
May 4, 2016
'When you become famous," the famous political consultant James Carville once said, "being famous becomes your profession. " It's a sign of the stunning success of Donald Trump's crossover act that we no longer even think about this campaign's most revolutionary effect on our politics: the demolition of the line between celebrity and political achievement. Of course, success in politics can itself breed celebrity. Carville earned his by combining his eccentric sense of humor with actual skill in helping Bill Clinton become president in 1992.
NEWS
March 2, 2016
Donald Trump's distinctive rhetorical style - think of a drunk with a bullhorn reading aloud James Joyce's Finnegans Wake under water - poses an almost insuperable challenge to people whose painful duty is to try to extract clarity from his effusions. For example, last week, during a long stream of semiconsciousness in Fort Worth, this man who as president would nominate members of the federal judiciary vowed to "open up" libel laws to make it easier to sue - to intimidate and punish - people who write "negative" things.
NEWS
December 21, 2015 | By Michael Smerconish
'Maybe this is the year we run the experiment?" I knew immediately what David Axelrod meant. And it wasn't the first time I'd heard the sentiment expressed while in Las Vegas to cover last week's Republican debate. We were sharing notes after the debate, awaiting an appearance on CNN. Axelrod spoke of the philosophical divide within the GOP as to whether the party is best served by nominating a pure conservative or a more pragmatic centrist. For many purists, history begins in 1980 with the nomination of Ronald Reagan.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2015
I don't want my children to grow up in Donald Trump's America. Trump, you see, envisions a country that is defined by insult and derision, by hateful rhetoric and by the steadfast belief that only those who agree with him have the right to express their opinions. Trump surprisingly has been successful with that strategy, but it's not Trump who worries me. It's his fans. Because when Trump says that Mexican immigrants are killers and rapists, or insults Sen. John McCain's service to this country, or insinuates that Fox News anchor Megyn Kelly's job performance is tied to her menstrual cycle, some of Trump's followers can't separate rhetoric from reality.
NEWS
August 20, 2015
WITH DONALD TRUMP showing staying power, Republican powers are anxious; like in a dentist's chair facing a drill without Novocain. For, despite predictions Trump can't last or will implode, he's holding a lead. He leads nationally. He leads in early caucus and primary states: Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina. And he isn't going away. Ed Rollins, former political adviser to President Reagan, this week wrote an op-ed for Reuters saying Trump can win the nomination. Imagine.
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