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John Mclaughlin

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1993 | By Karl Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Many jazz players have claimed inspiration from pianist Bill Evans' lyricism. But few have paid as much genteel homage as guitarist John McLaughlin on his impressive new Time Remembered: John McLaughlin Plays Bill Evans (Verve 1/2). McLaughlin's tribute includes neither percussion nor piano. He arranges some vintage Evans tunes for an acoustic bass guitar and a classical guitar foursome known as the Aighetta Quartet. The guitars sketch the tunes as well as the rich Evansian chords while McLaughlin launches the solos, which are hurled flaming from his guitar.
NEWS
October 2, 2007 | By David R. Adler FOR THE INQUIRER
John McLaughlin practically invented fusion guitar with Miles Davis in the late '60s, and with his Mahavishnu Orchestra in the '70s. The Monaco-based Briton is now 65, and still making music on a high level. His latest project, the 4th Dimension, filled the Keswick Theatre on Sunday. McLaughlin has recruited three players from Industrial Zen, his 2006 release, and brought them on the road. Multikeyboardist Gary Husband, once a drummer for Allan Holdsworth, supplied textural and harmonic depth and played absorbing solos.
NEWS
January 3, 1997 | By Jennifer Inez Ward, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
John McLaughlin, a local businessman, is appealing the supervisors' rejection of his request to turn his boatyard on Lincoln Highway into a used-car lot. McLaughlin says in a Bucks County Court suit that he believes the supervisors are punishing him for drainage problems in the township. "It's not fair," he said. "I don't see any categorical difference between selling boats and selling cars. " McLaughlin said plans for the lot were up in the air because the supervisors voted down turning Pekora's Marine at 657 E. Lincoln Highway (Business Route 1)
NEWS
January 12, 2008 | By Barbara Boyer, Dwight Ott and Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
John McLaughlin, the Port Richmond tavern operator accused of killing a bartender, has been apprehended, and a second man accused of helping hide the crime has been charged with obstruction. McLaughlin and his friend John Ciglar were arrested yesterday at the Executive Inn on Route 309 in Coopersburg, just south of Allentown, and brought back to the city in the afternoon, said Homicide Sgt. William Britt. "They were surprised we found them," Britt said, adding that the homicide Fugitive Squad and U.S. Marshal's Office tracked them down based on information garnered during the investigation.
NEWS
April 13, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
The four-bedroom house on Sylvan Drive emerges beyond a sprawling sycamore, with steps leading to the front door past children's toys on the lawn. It is a house like any other on the quiet block in Haddon Heights, yet on Halloween some trick-or-treaters seem to avoid the residence where Estyr Bomgardner lives with her husband, two sons, and their black Lab, Miroku. The family bought the house in 2012, overcoming qualms they had when they learned what had happened there. The sellers turned down a higher bid because the Bomgardners could move in sooner.
NEWS
March 6, 2012 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer
Note: This story has been corrected from an earlier version. THE LARGE, extended family of Seamus O'Neill had been waiting four years for the verdict that a Philadelphia jury handed to John McLaughlin yesterday - guilty of first-degree murder. Through numerous court delays and setbacks, O'Neill's family members - who emigrated from Northern Ireland more than 30 years ago - waited patiently to witness his murderer receive what he got: a sentence of life in state prison without parole.
NEWS
March 6, 2012 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the crowded, silent courtroom Monday, a knock came from behind the jury room door - a verdict had been reached. In the gallery, the many family and friends of Seamus O'Neill prayed. This moment was long coming. Four years ago, O'Neill, a 60-year-old Port Richmond bartender, was beaten to death with an aluminum baseball bat while having an after-work drink at another local pub. Tall and blue-eyed, with an easy laugh and irresistible brogue, O'Neill had tended bar at My Blue Heaven, a corner pub at Richmond and Pacific.
NEWS
April 22, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is known as the day Haddon Heights lost its innocence. April 20, 1995. John McLaughlin, 37, an investigator from the Camden County Prosecutor's Office, was fatally shot while trying to serve a search warrant at a borough home. Slain, too, was John Norcross, 24, a Haddon Heights police officer who was shot in the head as the suspect began firing onto a neighborhood street. On Monday, the 20th anniversary of the shooting, family members and more than 150 police officers and residents came together to remember the men's lives.
NEWS
May 3, 1995 | By Judy Baehr and Lillian Micko, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENTS
What a difference a year - and a tragedy - can make. This time last year, when the borough was in the process of adopting a budget and a new salary ordinance that included a raise for the police force, dozens of people turned out to complain. Last night, the salary ordinance, including a 4-percent increase for police, was given preliminary approval without a single word from the public. The basic message last year was that the police pay increases of recent vintage were excessive for members of a suburban force whose most difficult assignments, some persons suggested, might be stopping an occasional drunken driver.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 22, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is known as the day Haddon Heights lost its innocence. April 20, 1995. John McLaughlin, 37, an investigator from the Camden County Prosecutor's Office, was fatally shot while trying to serve a search warrant at a borough home. Slain, too, was John Norcross, 24, a Haddon Heights police officer who was shot in the head as the suspect began firing onto a neighborhood street. On Monday, the 20th anniversary of the shooting, family members and more than 150 police officers and residents came together to remember the men's lives.
NEWS
April 13, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
The four-bedroom house on Sylvan Drive emerges beyond a sprawling sycamore, with steps leading to the front door past children's toys on the lawn. It is a house like any other on the quiet block in Haddon Heights, yet on Halloween some trick-or-treaters seem to avoid the residence where Estyr Bomgardner lives with her husband, two sons, and their black Lab, Miroku. The family bought the house in 2012, overcoming qualms they had when they learned what had happened there. The sellers turned down a higher bid because the Bomgardners could move in sooner.
SPORTS
October 19, 2013 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
This isn't the run-dominated Unionville squad of years past. And West Chester Rustin coach Mike St. Clair is well aware of the switch in approaches. "They have a 50-50 pass-to-run ratio," St. Clair said. "They're more balanced than they've ever been. " With the Ches-Mont League American Conference championship on the line, undefeated Rustin (7-0 overall, 3-0 league), ranked 10th in Southeastern Pennsylvania by The Inquirer, will visit surging, No. 21 Unionville (6-1, 4-0) at 7 p.m. Friday in Kennett Square.
BUSINESS
October 26, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two Center City corporate accounting offices that admired each other from across the street are moving in together. BDO USA L.L.P. , a Chicago-based corporate accounting and business consulting firm, says it is acquiring Philadelphia accountants Asher & Co. Ltd. and taking on the firm's 10 partners and more than 100 staffers. The move joins Asher, based at 1801 Market, to BDO's 60-employee branch at 1800 Market. "We want to all be under one roof," but haven't yet worked out which home will house the pair, Asher managing director Joseph Beach told me. He'll remain, under BDO; he said no one will lose a job in the deal.
NEWS
April 14, 2012 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Port Richmond man found guilty of helping bartender John McLaughlin try to dispose of a body and then elude authorities was sentenced Friday to 11 1/2 to 23 months in prison by a Philadelphia judge. Before he was sentenced, Samuel E. Toy, 48, turned to the family and friends of victim Seamus O'Neill to "offer my deepest sympathy. . . . You are in my prayers. " Common Pleas Court Judge Jeffrey P. Minehart sentenced Toy to the prison term followed by two years of probation but allowed Toy to be immediately paroled as an inpatient to an alcohol treatment facility for evaluation of a drinking problem and the role it may have played in his conduct.
NEWS
April 13, 2012 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Port Richmond man found guilty of helping bartender John McLaughlin try to dispose of a body and then elude authorities was sentenced Friday to 111/2 to 23 months in prison by a Philadelphia judge. Before he was sentenced, Samuel E. Toy, 48, turned to the family and friends of victim Seamus O'Neill to "offer my deepest sympathy. . . . You are in my prayers. " Common Pleas Court Judge Jeffrey P. Minehart sentenced Toy to the prison term followed by two years of probation but allowed Toy to be immediately paroled as an inpatient to an alcohol treatment facility for evaluation of a drinking problem and the role it may have played in his conduct.
NEWS
March 6, 2012 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer
Note: This story has been corrected from an earlier version. THE LARGE, extended family of Seamus O'Neill had been waiting four years for the verdict that a Philadelphia jury handed to John McLaughlin yesterday - guilty of first-degree murder. Through numerous court delays and setbacks, O'Neill's family members - who emigrated from Northern Ireland more than 30 years ago - waited patiently to witness his murderer receive what he got: a sentence of life in state prison without parole.
NEWS
March 6, 2012 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the crowded, silent courtroom Monday, a knock came from behind the jury room door - a verdict had been reached. In the gallery, the many family and friends of Seamus O'Neill prayed. This moment was long coming. Four years ago, O'Neill, a 60-year-old Port Richmond bartender, was beaten to death with an aluminum baseball bat while having an after-work drink at another local pub. Tall and blue-eyed, with an easy laugh and irresistible brogue, O'Neill had tended bar at My Blue Heaven, a corner pub at Richmond and Pacific.
NEWS
March 2, 2012 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer
To drive home just how violent the baseball-bat beating Port Richmond bartender John McLaughlin allegedly gave patron Seamus O'Neill in January 2008, a city prosecutor Friday swung an aluminum bat with all his might, repeatedly striking a cushioned surface. "This, ladies and gentlemen...was a brutal, intentional extinguishing of human life," Assistant District Attorney Jude Conroy told the jury during his closing argument. McLaughlin defense attorney Brian McMonagle argued that another bartender, not his client, killed the 60-year-old native of Belfast, Northern Ireland.
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