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John Wanamaker

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NEWS
June 22, 1995 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 1861, a gangly 22-year-old South Philadelphia man who was so feeble that he was rejected for military service in the Civil War opened a men's clothing store at Sixth and Market Streets. He called it Oak Hall. It was John Wanamaker's first store, and it experimented with a new retail concept in those days of buyer-beware: It promised fixed prices, and customer satisfaction guaranteed. In his day, Wanamaker was always ahead of the competition. He developed one of the first department stores in the country.
NEWS
July 1, 1995 | By George Wilson
Eighty years ago my mother had a friendly encounter with John Wanamaker that tells a great deal about the kind of store he operated and the kind of man he was. With the John Wanamaker department-store chain in a state of transition, it is important not only that the Wanamaker name be perpetuated but also that the Wanamaker principles of customer service and satisfaction be revived. It will be no honor to the memory of Wanamaker to retain his name under new ownership unless his hands-on approach to retail management, with a personal touch, is emulated.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1995 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
In 1906, John Wanamaker lured customers to his department store with an extravagant exhibit in honor of the French Revolution. The exhibit included a display under glass of "exact" replicas of the guillotined heads of King Louis XVI and his queen, Marie Antoinette. Top that, Bloomingdale's. In case you think that employee-fitness programs are a recent phenomenon, please be advised that Wanamaker provided his employees with a rooftop running track and basketball courts, an employee athletic club and a medical clinic 80 years ago. And it could be that Japanese manufacturers whose employees start each workday with chants and exercises got the idea from our own John W.?
BUSINESS
August 28, 1995 | By William Allen Zulker, FOR THE INQUIRER
Few people are able to accomplish as much in a lifetime as the famed Philadelphia merchant John Wanamaker. It is also apparent that most individuals who gain widespread popularity do so because of their success in a single field of endeavor. But John Wanamaker rose to the top wherever he chose to become involved. His name has been a household word for many years. Founder of the well-known department store, pioneer in the mercantile business, advertising genius, educator, writer/ publisher, speech-maker, public servant, church builder and humanitarian, Wanamaker was the most eminent citizen of Philadelphia in 1900.
NEWS
November 21, 1999 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sometime this season, many parents or grandparents will take their children to Lord & Taylor to see Philadelphia's hokey, yet well-loved, tradition - the Christmas light show in the store's grand court. In their rush, they may not notice the statue of a rather unprepossessing man on the east plaza of City Hall. After all, he's not on a horse, or waving a flag or a gun. And they might not read the simple plaque on the simple statue, which simply says: "John Wanamaker - citizen.
NEWS
February 23, 1994 | By James Cordrey, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The way his eyes sparkle and his voice rises with excitement when he talks about his hero, you might think that the Rev. William Allen Zulker is a boy discussing his sports idol. "He was amazing. He did great things for the Philadelphia area," he said, leaning forward on the edge of his seat, wearing a broad smile. Mr. Zulker, 67, a minister and educator who lives in Wayne, is full of contagious energy and enthusiasm as he talks about Philadelphia clothing magnate John Wanamaker - his hero.
NEWS
April 14, 1988 | By S.E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
It's spring, and short-sleeve polo shirts have become a "hot" item - to the dismay of some retailers. Since the arrival of spring, shoplifters have been scooping up the shirts by the armful, according to police and store security personnel. On March 29, Abington police responded to a report of shoplifting at John Wanamaker in Jenkintown. They said store employees told them that two men entered the men's department, grabbed polo 15 shirts worth a total of $450 and fled in a waiting car. The next day, Abington police arrested two Philadelphia men on charges of stealing polo shirts, valued at $2,350, from the Lord & Taylor Department Store.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1991 | By Tawn Nhan, Inquirer Staff Writer
For construction worker Edward Whitney, it was a moment in history. It was one thing to be part of the wrecking team that demolished older parts of the 80-year-old Wanamaker Building. But it was almost a spiritual moment to see it all put back together again - in as grand a fashion as when it opened in 1911. "You can show your children that you were involved with building this, and it makes you feel good to be alive," Whitney said yesterday as he joined about 200 people in cheering the official unveiling of the newly renovated Wanamaker Building.
NEWS
March 31, 2000 | This is a shortened version of a piece by Ron Goldwyn that appeared in the Daily News Aug. 29, 1995
"Meet me at the eagle. " The eagle, of course, is the magnificently massive bronze bird in the Grand Court of the former John Wanamaker store (now Lord and Taylor) at 13th and Market.The bird stands 6-foot-6, weighs 2,500 pounds and has 5,000 feathers. For nearly 90 years, it's been Philadelphia's best-known meeting place. At the center of the central court of the Center City department store that will soon be known as Hecht's, the massive sculpture with tailfeathers you can sit beneath served as ultimate photo-op yesterday.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1995 | by Jacqueline Love, Daily News Staff Writer
The mood was tense yesterday on Market Street. Employees of John Wanamaker's flagship store spoke in hushed tones, as customers shopped as if no one should have a care in the world. But that wasn't the case. Many Wanamaker employees said they could not comment on the company's sale yesterday. They said they didn't know anything - even before they were asked. They said they didn't know that Federated Department Stores Inc., the Cincinnati-based company that owns Macy's and Bloomingdale's, among other stores, had just bought their store from Woodward and Lothrop Inc. in Washington, D.C. They said they didn't know that John Wanamaker's, as Philadelphia knows it, would soon be merely a cherished memory.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 14, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eugenia Burke Meade, 93, of Haddonfield, who retired in 1980 as corporate pension director and senior counselor for John Wanamaker, died Saturday, Jan. 10, at the Haddonfield home of her daughter, Mary Jo Gallagher. After she retired from the department store chain, Mrs. Meade was a teacher of weekly Confraternity of Christian Doctrine classes for youngsters who do not attend Catholic schools. The classes were at from the mid-1980s to the mid-2000s at Christ the King Regional School in Haddonfield, where she was also a substitute teacher and a playground moderator.
NEWS
July 30, 2013
TO: GOV. CORBETT RE: Operation Comeback First, I hope you enjoyed your getaway weekend at Bedford Springs Resort, and may I say what an excellent venue to meet with donors and advisers to start your "operation comeback. " Anything 100 miles from Harrisburg must seem pleasant to you, no? Plus, the history! Bedford was George Washington's headquarters during the "Whiskey Rebellion. " You used the setting to reset your own "Whiskey Rebellion," right? Pretty clever.
NEWS
June 27, 2013 | By Sean Carlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ann Marie Swartz, 74, a retired accounting clerk with the Diocese of Camden, died Sunday, June 22, of heart disease at Cooper University Hospital. Born in Palo Alto, Pa., to Thomas and Leah Colan, Mrs. Swartz graduated from Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary High School in Pottsville, Pa., in 1957. She attended Immaculata University for two years, hoping to become a nun, her daughter Lisa Myers said. An illness forced her to drop out. She met John "Jack" Swartz in April 1961, got engaged to him that year, and married in April 1962.
SPORTS
May 21, 2013 | By the Inquirer Staff
IBF light-heavyweight champion Bernard Hopkins has won the 2013 John Wanamaker Athletic Award. The Philadelphia native will receive the award June 20 in a ceremony at the Wanamaker Building's Crystal Tea Room. In 2011, Hopkins broke George Foreman's record as the oldest fighter in history to win a title when he defeated Jean Pascal for the WBC and Ring Magazine light-heavyweight crowns at age 46. On March 9, Hopkins easily decisioned Tavoris Cloud to capture the IBF title at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn.
NEWS
April 10, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Emilie DeS. Atlee, 97, of Narberth, a portrait and landscape painter who used the Atlantic seaboard as her material, died Wednesday, April 3, of advanced age at her home. Mrs. Atlee was a celebrated portrait artist who started out rendering portraits on paper with pastels and expanded into the use of oil pigments on canvas. She also painted with watercolors. Many of the scenes she painted were of the seashore or city. Others depicted the countryside and a covered bridge, or the play of light over treetops.
SPORTS
May 16, 2012
Flyers center Claude Giroux will receive the 2012 John Wanamaker athletic award June 5 at the Wanamaker Building's Crystal Tea Room. The Philadelphia Sports Congress, a division of the Philadelphia Convention and Visitors Bureau, presents the award each year in conjunction with Amerimar/Behringer Harvard. This season, Giroux scored 28 goals and had 93 points and led the NHL in scoring during the first two rounds of the playoffs. Since 1961, the Wanamaker Award has been presented "to the athlete, team, or organization that has done the most to reflect credit upon Philadelphia and to the team or sport in which they excel.
NEWS
July 19, 2011 | By Maria Panaritis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An expansion and redevelopment project is ahead for King of Prussia Mall, with officials announcing Tuesday plans to demolish the old John Wanamaker department store at the complex in order to make way for 10 new retail stores. The Wanamaker store at the Plaza, which was transformed for a short time into a Strawbridge's before it was decommissioned some time ago, will become the site of a two-story, 122,790-square-foot new building, officials said. It is the first major redevelopment at the East Coast's largest shopping mall since 2001, when construction crews redeveloped another old Strawbridge and Clothier store into the Pavilion.
NEWS
March 31, 2000 | This is a shortened version of a piece by Ron Goldwyn that appeared in the Daily News Aug. 29, 1995
"Meet me at the eagle. " The eagle, of course, is the magnificently massive bronze bird in the Grand Court of the former John Wanamaker store (now Lord and Taylor) at 13th and Market.The bird stands 6-foot-6, weighs 2,500 pounds and has 5,000 feathers. For nearly 90 years, it's been Philadelphia's best-known meeting place. At the center of the central court of the Center City department store that will soon be known as Hecht's, the massive sculpture with tailfeathers you can sit beneath served as ultimate photo-op yesterday.
NEWS
November 21, 1999 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sometime this season, many parents or grandparents will take their children to Lord & Taylor to see Philadelphia's hokey, yet well-loved, tradition - the Christmas light show in the store's grand court. In their rush, they may not notice the statue of a rather unprepossessing man on the east plaza of City Hall. After all, he's not on a horse, or waving a flag or a gun. And they might not read the simple plaque on the simple statue, which simply says: "John Wanamaker - citizen.
NEWS
June 11, 1999 | By Mark Davis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The first feathered notes of "Danny Boy" fly skyward, past the shoes and earrings and cultured pearls, beyond the purses and suit bags and this season's hottest swimwear, flitting seven stories above the Lord & Taylor sales floor. In flight, the notes prove a point: Fashions come, fashions go. But the Wanamaker organ? It's outlasted flappers and flower power. "This organ has a power," said Ray Biswanger, 45, founder of a nonprofit group, Friends of the Wanamaker Organ Inc. "People hear it, and they're transformed.
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