FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 16, 2009
Numerous letters were received this week after a blogger incorrectly reported that The Inquirer had recently hired former Justice Department official John Yoo, one author of memos justifying the Bush administration's use of torture to interrogate terror suspects. Actually, Yoo's monthly freelance column began last October. But here are some of the comments: Please reconsider your decision to give John Yoo a regular column. Whatever his skills as a legal scholar, the fact remains that he has been one of the architects of our government's shameful support of torture.
NEWS
January 19, 2008
Adam Zion Philadelphia The name John Yoo may not be familiar to some people, but he was the White House advisor (part of the Office of Legal Counsel) who authored the so-called torture memo, which recommended the use of torture in suspected terrorism-related cases. Well, in this week's column for The Inquirer ("Terror suspects are waging 'lawfare' on U.S.," Jan. 16), Yoo discusses how defendants in terrorism cases actually dare to demand to be tried in court, rather than by the extra-constitutional systems clearly desired by Yoo. John Yoo is, to put it mildly, a contemptible human being.
NEWS
March 18, 2009
Peter C. McVeigh Oreland pmcveigh46@hotmail.com Re: "Security vs. freedom: A balance kept," Sunday: In order to justify the illegal excesses of his own actions in the Justice Department, John Yoo points to Lincoln's suspension of habeas corpus during the Civil War and FDR's internment of thousands of Japanese after Pearl Harbor. After 9/11, Yoo helped to author the torture memos, which violated the Geneva Conventions, and he supported the warrantless wiretapping of American civilians, which undermined a basic principle of our Constitution.
NEWS
November 23, 2006
Description did not do justice to author's role On Nov. 13, The Inquirer published a commentary by John Yoo, whom it identified as "a former Bush Justice Department official and author of War by Other Means. " That description of Yoo is woefully inadequate. This is clearly demonstrated by a Washington Post review of Yoo's book, posted on Amazon.com. It says in part: "John Yoo is a law professor who served in the Office of Legal Counsel of the Department of Justice from 2001 to 2003.
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
A DECADE later, America's post-9/11 descent into torture is still an open wound for many - as folks are finding out this week at Drexel University Law School. A Philadelphia lawyers' group is ripping the law school for hosting a talk this afternoon by John Yoo, the ex-Justice Department lawyer who crafted the legal justification for the Bush administration's use of waterboarding and other torture tactics on terrorism suspects. The National Lawyers Guild called Yoo's slated appearance "deplorable," adding that his legal advice had sparked "negative repercussions in American foreign relations that we are still dealing with a dozen years later.
NEWS
January 7, 2010
WHAT MIGHT HAVE happened if, last spring, President Obama hadn't blocked congressional hearings into the Bush administration's authorization of torture - or even a milder "truth commission" - that then was supported by 62 percent of the American people? Would Dick Cheney, sure to have been top on the list of those investigated, now be taking every opportunity to undermine the current commander in chief? Would the White House be scurrying to explain that Obama does too use the words "war" and "terror" enough?
NEWS
March 11, 2008
President Bush doesn't believe that American civilians are also willing to sacrifice their lives to uphold the values that have served as the emblem of this nation for more than 230 years. If he did, he would know that millions of Americans who don't want to die in a repeat of 9/11 also don't want their country to torture people - even if it's in an attempt to stop a terrorist plot. These are people who grew up being taught that torture is un-American; that it's what happens to people in despotic nations - not in the land of the free.
NEWS
August 30, 2011 | By Pete Yost, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Justice Department is refusing to release legal memos that the George W. Bush administration used to justify his warrantless-surveillance program, one of the most contentious civil-liberties issues during the Republican president's time in office. In responding to a Freedom of Information Act request, Justice is withholding two legal analyses by then-government lawyer John Yoo and is disclosing just eight sentences from a third Yoo memo, dated Nov. 2, 2001. That memo is at least 21 pages long.
NEWS
July 22, 2005 | By Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
U.S. Supreme Court nominee John G. Roberts Jr. has a wealth of experience: Government lawyer. Civil litigator. Appellate specialist. But when it comes to criminal law, he just doesn't have much of a track record. That has left legal scholars searching for clues about how Roberts, who was nominated Tuesday by President Bush for the nation's highest court, might approach such hot-button topics as the death penalty and other issues affecting the administration of justice. "The central reality is that it hasn't been part of who he is as a lawyer," said Douglas Berman, a law professor at Ohio State University who called Roberts an "interesting blank slate" on criminal law matters.
NEWS
April 9, 2009 | By Elizabeth Goitein
There is broad consensus that the Justice Department needs serious reform, and no part of the department needs it more than the Office of Legal Counsel - the office that brought us the infamous John Yoo memos justifying torture. But some in Congress are threatening to derail reform by filibustering President Obama's eminently qualified choice to head the office. If they do, they will be voting against the rule of law and undermining national security in the process. Small and usually unnoticed, the Office of Legal Counsel is nevertheless a singularly important office.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 29, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
He would change very little. John Yoo, the former Justice Department lawyer and Philadelphia native who laid the legal groundwork for President George W. Bush's administration to use waterboarding and other harsh interrogation techniques, told faculty and students at Drexel University law school Thursday that he had correctly interpreted the law. And that he would do it again. "I do stand by the line that we drew," Yoo said. Yoo came to the law school for an hour-long exchange with Harvey Rishikof, a former legal counsel to the FBI who teaches national security law at Drexel.
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
A DECADE later, America's post-9/11 descent into torture is still an open wound for many - as folks are finding out this week at Drexel University Law School. A Philadelphia lawyers' group is ripping the law school for hosting a talk this afternoon by John Yoo, the ex-Justice Department lawyer who crafted the legal justification for the Bush administration's use of waterboarding and other torture tactics on terrorism suspects. The National Lawyers Guild called Yoo's slated appearance "deplorable," adding that his legal advice had sparked "negative repercussions in American foreign relations that we are still dealing with a dozen years later.
NEWS
August 30, 2011 | By Pete Yost, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Justice Department is refusing to release legal memos that the George W. Bush administration used to justify his warrantless-surveillance program, one of the most contentious civil-liberties issues during the Republican president's time in office. In responding to a Freedom of Information Act request, Justice is withholding two legal analyses by then-government lawyer John Yoo and is disclosing just eight sentences from a third Yoo memo, dated Nov. 2, 2001. That memo is at least 21 pages long.
NEWS
May 15, 2011
Bruce Ledewitz is professor of law at the Duquesne University School of Law in Pittsburgh and the author of Church, State, and the Crisis in American Secularism, which will be published May 30 Since the death of Osama bin Laden, John Yoo, a law professor at the University of California, Berkeley, and author of the infamous memo justifying torture when he was deputy assistant attorney general in 2002, has been saying that crucial intelligence was...
NEWS
January 7, 2010
WHAT MIGHT HAVE happened if, last spring, President Obama hadn't blocked congressional hearings into the Bush administration's authorization of torture - or even a milder "truth commission" - that then was supported by 62 percent of the American people? Would Dick Cheney, sure to have been top on the list of those investigated, now be taking every opportunity to undermine the current commander in chief? Would the White House be scurrying to explain that Obama does too use the words "war" and "terror" enough?
NEWS
May 16, 2009
Numerous letters were received this week after a blogger incorrectly reported that The Inquirer had recently hired former Justice Department official John Yoo, one author of memos justifying the Bush administration's use of torture to interrogate terror suspects. Actually, Yoo's monthly freelance column began last October. But here are some of the comments: Please reconsider your decision to give John Yoo a regular column. Whatever his skills as a legal scholar, the fact remains that he has been one of the architects of our government's shameful support of torture.
NEWS
April 9, 2009 | By Elizabeth Goitein
There is broad consensus that the Justice Department needs serious reform, and no part of the department needs it more than the Office of Legal Counsel - the office that brought us the infamous John Yoo memos justifying torture. But some in Congress are threatening to derail reform by filibustering President Obama's eminently qualified choice to head the office. If they do, they will be voting against the rule of law and undermining national security in the process. Small and usually unnoticed, the Office of Legal Counsel is nevertheless a singularly important office.
NEWS
March 18, 2009
Peter C. McVeigh Oreland pmcveigh46@hotmail.com Re: "Security vs. freedom: A balance kept," Sunday: In order to justify the illegal excesses of his own actions in the Justice Department, John Yoo points to Lincoln's suspension of habeas corpus during the Civil War and FDR's internment of thousands of Japanese after Pearl Harbor. After 9/11, Yoo helped to author the torture memos, which violated the Geneva Conventions, and he supported the warrantless wiretapping of American civilians, which undermined a basic principle of our Constitution.
NEWS
March 11, 2008
President Bush doesn't believe that American civilians are also willing to sacrifice their lives to uphold the values that have served as the emblem of this nation for more than 230 years. If he did, he would know that millions of Americans who don't want to die in a repeat of 9/11 also don't want their country to torture people - even if it's in an attempt to stop a terrorist plot. These are people who grew up being taught that torture is un-American; that it's what happens to people in despotic nations - not in the land of the free.
NEWS
January 19, 2008
Adam Zion Philadelphia The name John Yoo may not be familiar to some people, but he was the White House advisor (part of the Office of Legal Counsel) who authored the so-called torture memo, which recommended the use of torture in suspected terrorism-related cases. Well, in this week's column for The Inquirer ("Terror suspects are waging 'lawfare' on U.S.," Jan. 16), Yoo discusses how defendants in terrorism cases actually dare to demand to be tried in court, rather than by the extra-constitutional systems clearly desired by Yoo. John Yoo is, to put it mildly, a contemptible human being.
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