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Johnny Callison

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SPORTS
July 24, 1989 | By Stan Hochman, Daily News Sports Columnist
Johnny Callison lit another cigarette. Somewhere, the surgeon who carved away half his stomach winced. Somewhere, the cardiologist who performed the triple bypass groaned. Callison grinned a crooked, little smile and took another deep drag. If he was going to talk about 1964, he needed to look back through the gauzy haze of cigarette smoke. He is 50, a bartender at Tomato's in Doylestown. Strangers are always asking him what happened in '64 when the Phillies blew a 6 1/2-game lead with 12 to play.
SPORTS
August 28, 2003 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On a lazy August afternoon in 1995, former Phillies star Johnny Callison and his wife, Dianne, were having lunch at a Bucks County tavern when a familiar topic arose. "The bartender was talking about how someone had just missed it recently," Dianne Callison recalled not long afterward. "I said I hope that never happened. " Their topic was a Phillies-Pirates game at Forbes Field in 1963. That day, Callison had pulled off one of baseball's rarest feats - collecting a single, double, triple and homer.
SPORTS
July 9, 2012
For Phillies fans in the ill-fated 1964 season, it was easy to believe New York's new Shea Stadium was a magical place. On June 21, 1964, Phils ace Jim Bunning pitched the first perfect game by a National League hurler since 1880. And 16 days later, on July 7, rightfielder Johnny Callison nailed a two-out, ninth-inning three-run home run in the All-Star Game against Red Sox super-closer Dick "The Monster" Raditz. It remains the only walk-off homer in All-Star Game history. But, as the Daily News' Stan Hochman wrote, it wasn't Callison's style to boast.
SPORTS
July 17, 2013 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Baseball fame, like all fame, is fickle. Sometimes it's as enduring as the game itself. Sometimes it lasts only as long as a walk-off trip around the bases. And sometimes, as with Johnny Callison, it melts away gradually. The expiration date on Callison's glory, much of which the late Phillies outfielder acquired as the 1964 All-Star Game's MVP, may be fast approaching. With the Mets hosting the All-Star Game this summer for the first time since that memorable afternoon at Shea Stadium 49 years ago, Callison's game-winning home run has enjoyed a brief and sudden revival.
SPORTS
August 9, 2003 | By Sam Carchidi INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He was a young, power-hitting Phillies outfielder with matinee good looks. A player who seemed on the verge of stardom. A player whose hitting stroke, suddenly and without warning, all but disappeared. Pat Burrell? Well, the description fits. But decades before Burrell's well-chronicled struggles, Phillies rightfielder Johnny Callison went through a similar scenario. In 1964, at the age of 25, Callison hit 31 homers, tying him for third in the National League, and knocked in 104 runs.
SPORTS
July 8, 1996 | By Sam Carchidi, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He slammed one of the most dramatic home runs ever hit by a Phillie, to win the 1964 All-Star Game in the ninth inning. Millions were watching on national television. He is the only Phillie to be named most valuable player of an All-Star Game. Yet the three-run homer Johnny Callison hit off Dick "The Monster" Radatz to give the National League a 7-4 victory at Shea Stadium 32 years ago isn't the first thing Callison recalls when his memory drifts back to 1964. "When I think of '64," the former rightfielder said at his home in Glenside last week, "I think of the pain first and what we did at the end. " You know about the end. The '64 Phillies - an overachieving team whose nucleus included several survivors of an infamous 23-game losing streak in 1961 - held a hard-to-believe 6 1/2-game lead with 12 games remaining.
NEWS
July 10, 2011
1. b. Comiskey Park, Chicago. 2. a. 1943, in Shibe Park. 3. c. 1996, in Veterans Stadium. 4. d. Johnny Callison, in 1964. 5. b. Jimmy Rollins, in 2001. 6. c. Richie Ashburn. 7. c. Pete Rose, in 1985, playing for the Cincinnati Reds, was 44 years, 3 months, and 2 days old. 8. d. Bobby Abreu. 9. a. Charlie Manuel, in 2009 and '10. 10. Mack, 1933; Sawyer, '51; Mauch, '65; Green, '81; Owens, '84; Fregosi, '94; Manuel, 2009 and '10.
NEWS
October 18, 2006
I'M A LONGTIME Eagles fan who reads the Daily News online from an Internet cafe in Mafraq, Jordan. I've been a Peace Corps volunteer here since July 2005 and have religiously followed the Eagles, watching the live updates online for all 1 p.m. games and having my friends call me at halftime and the end of the game for updates for the later games (1 a.m. and 3 a.m. my time for 4 p.m. games). I'm working in a youth center in, and one of my activities is teaching football to the kids here.
SPORTS
October 19, 2006 | By Sam Carchidi INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The widow of Johnny Callison is trying to arrange a public memorial service for the former Phillies star. A private memorial service was held Tuesday, but Dianne Callison said she has received so many requests that she also wants to have a public service. "So many people loved him," she said yesterday, "and we want to do something. " Dianne Callison said that a public memorial service is tentatively scheduled for Oct. 28 and that she is working out details on where to have it. She has contacted the Phillies for their input.
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SPORTS
July 17, 2013 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Baseball fame, like all fame, is fickle. Sometimes it's as enduring as the game itself. Sometimes it lasts only as long as a walk-off trip around the bases. And sometimes, as with Johnny Callison, it melts away gradually. The expiration date on Callison's glory, much of which the late Phillies outfielder acquired as the 1964 All-Star Game's MVP, may be fast approaching. With the Mets hosting the All-Star Game this summer for the first time since that memorable afternoon at Shea Stadium 49 years ago, Callison's game-winning home run has enjoyed a brief and sudden revival.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By B.G. Kelley
The specter of Johnny Callison will surely be present during the All-Star Game this week at the Mets' Citi Field. The last time the Mets hosted the midsummer classic was almost 50 years ago, at Shea Stadium, and fans couldn't have been treated to a more compelling conclusion. It was July 7, 1964, the dawning of the Age of Aquarius. More than 50,000 fans were crammed into Shea. What happened in that game sticks to my memory the way a first kiss sticks to your lips. With the score tied 4-4 in the bottom of the ninth inning, San Francisco's Orlando Cepeda and Cincinnati's Johnny Edwards were on first and second.
SPORTS
July 15, 2013 | By Stan Hochman, Daily News Columnist
NINTH INNING of the 1964 All-Star Game, score tied, two on, two out. Johnny Callison borrows a bat from Chicago's Billy Williams because it's lighter, because it's getting darker, because that's Dick Radatz out there for the American League. Radatz was 6-foot-6 and at least 250, which was enough to get him nicknamed "Monster. " That, and his 99-mph fastball and his wicked sidearm motion. Pow. Callison lashes that lighter bat and rips a fastball into the rightfield seats at Shea Stadium for a walkoff three-run home run. The Nationals beat the Americans, 7-4. They have been playing the All-Star Game since 1933, sometimes twice a year (you could look it up)
SPORTS
July 9, 2012
For Phillies fans in the ill-fated 1964 season, it was easy to believe New York's new Shea Stadium was a magical place. On June 21, 1964, Phils ace Jim Bunning pitched the first perfect game by a National League hurler since 1880. And 16 days later, on July 7, rightfielder Johnny Callison nailed a two-out, ninth-inning three-run home run in the All-Star Game against Red Sox super-closer Dick "The Monster" Raditz. It remains the only walk-off homer in All-Star Game history. But, as the Daily News' Stan Hochman wrote, it wasn't Callison's style to boast.
NEWS
July 10, 2011
1. b. Comiskey Park, Chicago. 2. a. 1943, in Shibe Park. 3. c. 1996, in Veterans Stadium. 4. d. Johnny Callison, in 1964. 5. b. Jimmy Rollins, in 2001. 6. c. Richie Ashburn. 7. c. Pete Rose, in 1985, playing for the Cincinnati Reds, was 44 years, 3 months, and 2 days old. 8. d. Bobby Abreu. 9. a. Charlie Manuel, in 2009 and '10. 10. Mack, 1933; Sawyer, '51; Mauch, '65; Green, '81; Owens, '84; Fregosi, '94; Manuel, 2009 and '10.
SPORTS
December 15, 2009 | By Bill Conlin, Daily News Columnist
THE CAROUSEL ridden by major league baseball's 30 teams has something in common with the planet we all ride upon. Earth makes one full revolution around the sun in what we call a year. MLB's merry-go-round makes one full revolution in what we call a season. After trading a kid righthander named Ferguson Jenkins and a couple of bench players to the Cubs for established righthanders Larry Jackson and Bob Buhl, Phillies general manager John Quinn said this: "The golden ring only comes around once a year and when you've got a chance to grab it, you've got to do anything it takes because you may never be that close again.
SPORTS
October 28, 2009 | by Joe Sixpack
WHATEVER YOU think about the hated New York Yankees, you can thank them for one of the most fortunate transactions in Philadelphia baseball history. And, no, I'm not talking about taking Bobby Abreu off our hands. In 1955 - 5 years after the Bronx Bombers swept the Phils in their only other World Series matchup - the Yankees sold us their giant scoreboard. That's right, the Ballantine Beer scoreboard - the famous 50-foot-tall behemoth that towered in right-centerfield at Connie Mack Stadium at 21st & Lehigh.
SPORTS
October 28, 2009
WHATEVER YOU think about the hated New York Yankees, you can thank them for one of the most fortunate transactions in Philadelphia baseball history. And, no, I'm not talking about taking Bobby Abreu off our hands. In 1955 - 5 years after the Bronx Bombers swept the Phils in their only other World Series matchup - the Yankees sold us their giant scoreboard. That's right, the Ballantine Beer scoreboard - the famous 50-foot-tall behemoth that towered in right-centerfield at Connie Mack Stadium at 21st & Lehigh.
SPORTS
July 15, 2009 | By PAUL HAGEN, hagenp@phillynews.com
ST. LOUIS - What a story it would have been, 45 years after Johnny Callison won the All-Star Game at New York's Shea Stadium with a walkoff homer, securing a spot in Phillies lore forever. There was Ryan Howard, returning to Busch Stadium, a hometown hero back to play in the All-Star Game. There was Howard, striding to the plate as a pinch-hitter in the bottom of the eighth inning with two outs and two on and the National League down by a single run. There he was with a chance to create a moment that would be remembered for a long, long time.
NEWS
October 30, 2006
RE THE death of Johnny Callison: I've been quite taken aback by how many people not only remember Callison after all these years, but how many considered him their hero. I, too, count myself in that number. There was always something true and consistent about him. Unlike so many ballplayers today, he never purposely drew attention to himself, yet his clutch hitting often put the limelight on him whether he wanted it or not. I'll never forget listening to my radio in 1964 as he hit that all-star home run. I was on top of the world because it was my hero who had won the game.
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