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Johnny Carson

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NEWS
May 13, 1988 | By Lee Winfrey, Inquirer TV Critic
Johnny Carson's mediocre opening monologue Wednesday night, which he wrote himself, was a totally convincing demonstration of why the king of late-night television normally feels a need for 10 joke writers to help him. His spotty soliloquy was the kind of uneven stuff that - as has happened so often in the past when a joke has fallen flat - has caused Carson to make some sour crack about the limp lines handed him. He couldn't do that this...
LIVING
September 9, 1993 | By W. Speers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story includes information from the Associated Press, the New York Post and USA Today
Johnny Carson will be among five artists to receive Kennedy Center honors at a Washington gala Dec. 5. The former talk-show host is the first pure TV figure to get the award since the honors were established in 1978 to recognize distinguished contributions in the performing arts. Those cited with Carson will be Broadway composer Stephen Sondheim, conductor Georg Solti, gospel singer Marian Williams and Arthur Mitchell, founder of the Dance Theater of Harlem. They'll all be treated to a White House reception hosted by President Clinton before the Kennedy bash.
NEWS
January 25, 2005
Johnny Carson was more than a superb late-night TV comedian. For three decades, Carson was often the first and last word on popular culture and politics, a social commentator who showed America how to be critical without being mean. Although he had been off the air a dozen years, his death Sunday at 79 marked for millions the passing of a golden age of entertainment. Carson's dominance of late-night TV became a commentary of sorts on all Americans. You were either the kind of person who stayed up late to see what outrageous thing Carson would do. Or you were the kind who valued sleep more than the prospect of a good belly laugh.
NEWS
July 12, 1992 | From Inquirer wire services Inquirer television critic Jonathan Storm contributed to this report
Johnny Carson is coming back to NBC. Beaming network programming boss Warren Littlefield announced last night to a group of television critics meeting in Los Angeles that Carson had signed "an exclusive, multiyear deal to star in and/or develop original programming" for NBC. "Our appetite for Johnny is huge," Littlefield said when asked to describe the legendary late- night talk show host's future with the network. Littlefield would not rule out the possibility that Carson might star in a sitcom, but he also said that the network was considering "many, many different kinds of projects" and that Carson would "have a large say" in his new role at the network.
NEWS
October 1, 1987 | By Lee Winfrey, Inquirer TV Writer
The most perpetually popular of television stars, Johnny Carson, will share memories of his last quarter-century with several million of his friends tonight. Carson, still slender as a sorcerer's wand and as bright as a baby's smile as he approaches 62, will observe his 25th anniversary as the host of The Tonight Show in a retrospective 90-minute special beginning at 9:30 p.m. on NBC (Channel 3). Walter Cronkite, who anchored The CBS Evening News for 14 years; James Arness, who strode the streets of Dodge City, Kan., for 20 years as Marshal Matt Dillon in Gunsmoke, and Lucille Ball, the superenergized heroine of 23 years' worth of situation comedies - all have run their lengthy courses while Carson continues, with no end in sight to his reign as the ruler of late-night TV. Behind him lie the fallen forms of many a bedtime talk-show host - from Joey Bishop and Merv Griffin in the 1960s, through Dick Cavett in the 1970s, to Alan Thicke and Joan Rivers in the 1980s - who vainly sought to dislodge Carson's iron grip on the pajama tops of American viewers.
NEWS
May 20, 1992 | By P. J. Corkery, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
He is grouchy in the mornings at Malibu when he wakes up; indeed "grump hour" is what his wife calls those first few moments at Johnny Carson's home. To himself, as well as to many others, this seems odd. After all, when Johnny Carson wakes up each morning, he not only awakens on one of the most stunning beaches in North America, he is also about $50,000 richer than he was when he went to bed. And he doesn't have to be at the job by 9. Furthermore he is a comedian, the national comedian.
NEWS
September 9, 2016 | By Sofiya Ballin, Staff Writer
The set of The Q , Fox 29's (WTXF-TV) new daytime talk show, is spacious, airy, and quiet as host and producer Quincy Harris, 37, stands in the center. His name scrolls in the background. It's the realization of a dream he's had since he was 12 growing up in Germantown. "It feels surreal," Harris said, looking across the set. "You see your name and it's like, 'What is going on?' " The Q is what's going on. The show that bears his first initial premieres at noon Monday.
NEWS
May 23, 1992
Today is the first day of the rest of TV history. Johnny Carson has retired. Even those baby boomers who long ago switched to "Nightline" - or, more likely, now go to sleep around 10 - will see it as the end of something. It was, after all, watching Johnny Carson that was the mark of being "grownup" when they weren't. Think how many times our perspective of the world has changed since those days in 1962 when Carson first took over "The Tonight Show. " Yet Johnny Carson avoided being identified with any one point of view.
NEWS
January 18, 2013
Daniel Edelman, 92, who built one of the world's top public-relations companies and pioneered celebrity endorsements, died of heart failure Tuesday at a Chicago hospital. He is credited with developing many of the methods now standard in the field, after transforming the firm he started more than 60 years ago with two people into a marketing force with more than 4,500 employees in 66 offices worldwide. Clients include Microsoft, Pfizer, Wal-Mart, and Royal Dutch Shell. By the 1950s and after a stint in journalism, Mr. Edelman had moved into public relations.
NEWS
July 4, 2012
Former NBC president Julian Goodman, 90, who helped establish Chet Huntley and David Brinkley as a news team and led the network from 1966 to 1974, died Monday. He died of kidney failure in Juno Beach, Fla., where he lived after retiring as chairman of NBC's board in 1979. The native of Glasgow, Ky., joined the network at the night news desk in Washington in 1945. He rose to become executive vice president of NBC News at the time Huntley and Brinkley were competitors to Walter Cronkite on CBS. As network president, he gave Johnny Carson a long-term contract to stay on the Tonight show and helped make the American Football League a force by broadcasting the upstart league.
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NEWS
September 9, 2016 | By Sofiya Ballin, Staff Writer
The set of The Q , Fox 29's (WTXF-TV) new daytime talk show, is spacious, airy, and quiet as host and producer Quincy Harris, 37, stands in the center. His name scrolls in the background. It's the realization of a dream he's had since he was 12 growing up in Germantown. "It feels surreal," Harris said, looking across the set. "You see your name and it's like, 'What is going on?' " The Q is what's going on. The show that bears his first initial premieres at noon Monday.
NEWS
September 20, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
FOLLOWING IN the physics-laden footsteps of co-stars Mayim Bialik and Melissa Rauch , the three principal players of the CBS sitcom hit, "The Big Bang Theory," Jim Parsons , Johnny Galecki and Kaley Cuoco , may pull a "Friends" and bargain as one next year to get a raise. A big raise. While most middle-class workers have seen their wages stay flat, the top-1 percent triad at "Big Bang" are seeking a bump up to $500,000 per episode for the 2014-15 season. They currently make about $350,000 apiece, per episode, according to Radar Online, about $6 million per year.
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER TV WRITER
This is what passes for a crisis in the lives of TV critics: Each year about this time (well, except for the terrible Mad Men drought of 2011 - about which the less said the better), they're sent a disc with the first few hours of the new Mad Men season. The problem is that it invariably arrives with a note from the show's haughty creator, Matt Weiner, spelling out the details and plot points he strongly requests not be revealed. There follows an inventory of taboo subjects longer than the packing list for your kids' summer camp.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2013 | By David Bauder, Associated Press
NEW YORK - NBC announced Wednesday that Jimmy Fallon, as rumored, will succeed Jay Leno as host of The Tonight Show . The network also announced the franchise will move back to New York and that Saturday Night Live producer Lorne Michaels will become Tonight 's executive producer. Fallon will take over in about a year. The switch will coincide with NBC's Winter Olympics coverage next year. NBC made no announcement about Fallon's replacement at the 12:35 a.m. Late Night slot, although Seth Meyers of Saturday Night Live is considered a strong candidate.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2013 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER TV WRITER
This is what passes for a crisis in the lives of TV critics: Each year about this time (well, except for the terrible Mad Men drought of 2011 - about which the less said the better), they're sent a disc with the first few hours of the new Mad Men season. The problem is that it invariably arrives with a note from the show's haughty creator, Matt Weiner, spelling out the details and plot points he strongly requests not be revealed. There follows an inventory of tabooed subjects longer than the packing list for your kids' summer camp.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2013
I'M OLD ENOUGH - just barely - to remember when hosting the Oscars wasn't the showbiz equivalent of the Ironman, requiring a singing, dancing funnyman (or woman) who could somehow bring freshness to a tired format while not upsetting anyone too much and, oh, yeah, meeting East Coast newspaper deadlines. Which are earlier than ever these days. Bob Hope and Johnny Carson never dealt with the instantaneous judgment of Twitter and Facebook, much less had to follow Billy Crystal, who raised Oscar hosting to an Olympic sport in which even David Letterman and Jon Stewart failed to medal.
NEWS
January 18, 2013
Daniel Edelman, 92, who built one of the world's top public-relations companies and pioneered celebrity endorsements, died of heart failure Tuesday at a Chicago hospital. He is credited with developing many of the methods now standard in the field, after transforming the firm he started more than 60 years ago with two people into a marketing force with more than 4,500 employees in 66 offices worldwide. Clients include Microsoft, Pfizer, Wal-Mart, and Royal Dutch Shell. By the 1950s and after a stint in journalism, Mr. Edelman had moved into public relations.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2012 | By Scott Collins, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - As the No. 1 late-night show for most of the last half-century, The Tonight Show has been vital to NBC. It was the network's most profitable entertainment program during its 1990s peak, kicking an estimated $100 million to the bottom line annually. But Tonight is in trouble. This month, the show saw wide layoffs for only the second time in its 58-year history, with about 20 people losing their jobs and host Jay Leno taking a pay cut of more than 10 percent from his estimated $26 million annual salary.
NEWS
July 4, 2012
Former NBC president Julian Goodman, 90, who helped establish Chet Huntley and David Brinkley as a news team and led the network from 1966 to 1974, died Monday. He died of kidney failure in Juno Beach, Fla., where he lived after retiring as chairman of NBC's board in 1979. The native of Glasgow, Ky., joined the network at the night news desk in Washington in 1945. He rose to become executive vice president of NBC News at the time Huntley and Brinkley were competitors to Walter Cronkite on CBS. As network president, he gave Johnny Carson a long-term contract to stay on the Tonight show and helped make the American Football League a force by broadcasting the upstart league.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2012 | By Howard Gensler
TATTLE WROTE about the plight of Canadian sex-change beauty-pageant contestant Jenna Talackova and our readers responded. Now Donald Trump 's Miss Universe Organization has announced that it might reverse an earlier decision and allow the transgender woman to compete in the finals. Jenna was born with male Jenna-talia (a lack of Talackovaries), leading organizers to disqualify her last month as a finalist for Miss Universe Canada. You'd think the Donald would respect a self-made woman.
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