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Johnny Copeland

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2001 | By Nick Cristiano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Who says you have to be going gray before you can sing the blues? Not Shemekia Copeland. At the tender age of 22, the singer is already a commanding presence in the field. And she has the industry validation to back it up: Last month at the W.C. Handy Blues Awards - the blues' version of the Grammys - the daughter of late blues great Johnny Copeland scored an impressive hat trick: best female contemporary blues artist, best song ("It's 2 A.M.," written by Rick Vito), and blues album of the year (Wicked)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1986 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
One of the most acclaimed young British rock bands, the Woodentops, will perform Sunday in Houston Hall at the University of Pennsylvania. The Woodentops' first American release, Giant (Columbia), features pretty melodies, murmured vocals and vigorously strummed acoustic guitars. In the old days, we called this "folk-rock. " These days, in the amnesiac pop world, it's the Next Big Thing From England. This, of course, is not the Woodentops' fault. At its best, this quintet takes familiar styles and makes them its own - this is the sound of hesitation and doubt, of romantic hemming and hawing, offered in a gentle, unassuming manner.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1986 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
New Edition, the Force M.D.'s and Cherelle combine to form an exciting bill at the Spectrum for two shows tomorrow. These three acts offer the latest refinements in pop/rhythm-and-blues, each with its own stylistic variation. New Edition's latest album, All for Love (MCA), proves that this Boston quartet is far more than the teeny-bopper novelty act many observers had assumed when "Candy Girl" became an out-of-nowhere hit single in 1981. Groups of singing teenagers that score one hit and then disappear into rock-and-roll history are a familiar story, but New Edition has managed to build a solid career, even as the members' voices have changed.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2009 | By Nick Cristiano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shemekia Copeland figured it was time to speak up. "Talking about religion and politics and things like that, I've never done that before, purposely," the blues powerhouse says over the phone from her Chicago home. "But with all the stuff that's going on in the world right now, I just felt it hard not to talk about some of this stuff and how I felt about it. " Copeland is referring to her fifth album, the terrific new Never Going Back, which includes such hard-hitting sides as "Sounds Like the Devil," "Big Brand New Religion," "Broken World," and Buddy and Julie Miller's "Dirty Water.
NEWS
October 10, 2005 | By Keith Harris FOR THE INQUIRER
With her snazzy purple blouse, some breezy between-song jokes, and a voice huge enough to contain elements of soul and gospel, Shemekia Copeland is a latter-day personification of the urbane blues nightclub performer. Rough-hewn guitarist Otis Taylor, by contrast, electrifies the choppy trancelike repetitions of the oldest Delta blues, in the tradition of John Lee Hooker. But at World Cafe Live on Friday, both acts captured a mix of humor with pain, and of broad entertainment with social criticism that marks the truest blues performances.
NEWS
November 25, 1993 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Blues great Albert Collins, 61, a Grammy Award winner for his distinctive guitar tone, died yesterday at his home in Las Vegas after a three-month battle with lung cancer. As a vocalist and guitarist, Mr. Collins was one of the world's best-known and best-respected bluesmen. Musician magazine called him "the most powerful blues guitarist in the world. " He was one of the first blues stars to appeal to a rock-and-roll audience. He got his nickname - "the master of the Telecaster" (a kind of guitar)
NEWS
October 1, 2012 | By Brian Howard, For The Inquirer
What a strange patch of the blues world Shemekia Copeland has come to call home. Blessed with a set of pipes that would make a steamfitter blush, the daughter of late Texas blues legend Johnny Copeland was born into, and eventually coronated by, a blues institution steeped in tradition. (She was crowned "Queen of the Blues" at the 2011 Chicago Blues Festival.) As with other long-neglected blues and R&B vets, she's finding audiences with kids who don't know B.B. King from Albert. What's a tradition-minded former child prodigy to do?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2005 | By Nick Cristiano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shemekia Copeland wasn't sure which direction to go in for her fourth album. Her third, the Dr. John-produced Talking to Strangers, had further established the daughter of the late bluesman Johnny Copeland as one of the most commanding young voices in the blues. "I wanted to do a live record, but the record company said no," the 26-year-old singer said from her Chicago home. So the blues powerhouse decided to pursue another musical love - soul. "Cropper's name came up, and we got in touch with him and he said he wanted to do it," Copeland added.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2012
Shemekia Copeland "I'll sing the blues to you," Shemekia Copeland declares on her new album, 331/3 . Will she ever. The daughter of the late blues great Johnny Copeland, Shemekia has firmly established herself as a commanding blues presence in her own right, even while showing that her definition of the music is pretty expansive. In the past she has worked with such name producers as Dr. John and Steve Cropper. For 331/3 she teams up for the second straight time with guitarist and songwriter Oliver Wood of the rootsy but tough-to-define Wood Brothers, and again it's a fruitful collaboration.
NEWS
October 2, 1998 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Mem Shannon worries that he's not bringing the right clothes to such a posh affair. "Will they let me in wearing sneakers?" he teases. Shemekia Copeland is concerned that the price of admission might keep a lot of music fans away. But folks who dress up nice and fork out $100 apiece for tomorrow night's Great Philadelphia Blues Festival Dinner Dance at the University of Pennsylvania Museum will surely be getting their money's worth, and a wail of a good show. Headlining acts Shannon and Copeland are two of the hottest and most intriguing young blues performers in the nation.
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NEWS
October 1, 2012 | By Brian Howard, For The Inquirer
What a strange patch of the blues world Shemekia Copeland has come to call home. Blessed with a set of pipes that would make a steamfitter blush, the daughter of late Texas blues legend Johnny Copeland was born into, and eventually coronated by, a blues institution steeped in tradition. (She was crowned "Queen of the Blues" at the 2011 Chicago Blues Festival.) As with other long-neglected blues and R&B vets, she's finding audiences with kids who don't know B.B. King from Albert. What's a tradition-minded former child prodigy to do?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2012
Shemekia Copeland "I'll sing the blues to you," Shemekia Copeland declares on her new album, 331/3 . Will she ever. The daughter of the late blues great Johnny Copeland, Shemekia has firmly established herself as a commanding blues presence in her own right, even while showing that her definition of the music is pretty expansive. In the past she has worked with such name producers as Dr. John and Steve Cropper. For 331/3 she teams up for the second straight time with guitarist and songwriter Oliver Wood of the rootsy but tough-to-define Wood Brothers, and again it's a fruitful collaboration.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2009 | By Nick Cristiano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shemekia Copeland figured it was time to speak up. "Talking about religion and politics and things like that, I've never done that before, purposely," the blues powerhouse says over the phone from her Chicago home. "But with all the stuff that's going on in the world right now, I just felt it hard not to talk about some of this stuff and how I felt about it. " Copeland is referring to her fifth album, the terrific new Never Going Back, which includes such hard-hitting sides as "Sounds Like the Devil," "Big Brand New Religion," "Broken World," and Buddy and Julie Miller's "Dirty Water.
NEWS
October 10, 2005 | By Keith Harris FOR THE INQUIRER
With her snazzy purple blouse, some breezy between-song jokes, and a voice huge enough to contain elements of soul and gospel, Shemekia Copeland is a latter-day personification of the urbane blues nightclub performer. Rough-hewn guitarist Otis Taylor, by contrast, electrifies the choppy trancelike repetitions of the oldest Delta blues, in the tradition of John Lee Hooker. But at World Cafe Live on Friday, both acts captured a mix of humor with pain, and of broad entertainment with social criticism that marks the truest blues performances.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2005 | By Nick Cristiano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shemekia Copeland wasn't sure which direction to go in for her fourth album. Her third, the Dr. John-produced Talking to Strangers, had further established the daughter of the late bluesman Johnny Copeland as one of the most commanding young voices in the blues. "I wanted to do a live record, but the record company said no," the 26-year-old singer said from her Chicago home. So the blues powerhouse decided to pursue another musical love - soul. "Cropper's name came up, and we got in touch with him and he said he wanted to do it," Copeland added.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2005 | By Nick Cristiano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You're so cool, in an old-school kind of way. - "You Make Me Dig," sung by Bobby Purify Shemekia Copeland has had it with bland, corporate radio. "I want passion, I want feeling," the 26-year-old powerhouse demands in "Who Stole My Radio?," one of the many standout tracks on her scorching new album. Copeland may be too raw for big airplay herself. But she and the other artists here offer undeniable proof that old-school deep soul can be as vital as ever, and it's out there for anyone who's put off by what passes for "R&B" these days.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2001 | By Nick Cristiano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Who says you have to be going gray before you can sing the blues? Not Shemekia Copeland. At the tender age of 22, the singer is already a commanding presence in the field. And she has the industry validation to back it up: Last month at the W.C. Handy Blues Awards - the blues' version of the Grammys - the daughter of late blues great Johnny Copeland scored an impressive hat trick: best female contemporary blues artist, best song ("It's 2 A.M.," written by Rick Vito), and blues album of the year (Wicked)
NEWS
October 2, 1998 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Mem Shannon worries that he's not bringing the right clothes to such a posh affair. "Will they let me in wearing sneakers?" he teases. Shemekia Copeland is concerned that the price of admission might keep a lot of music fans away. But folks who dress up nice and fork out $100 apiece for tomorrow night's Great Philadelphia Blues Festival Dinner Dance at the University of Pennsylvania Museum will surely be getting their money's worth, and a wail of a good show. Headlining acts Shannon and Copeland are two of the hottest and most intriguing young blues performers in the nation.
NEWS
October 10, 1997 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Tributes, not imitation, are really the sincerest form of flattery in pop music these days. And this fall, music fans can enjoy a fat stack of new tribute albums. Most feature well-known artists paying homage to even bigger stars by covering the latter's material. Clearly, these are songs that changed their lives and ours. Leading the pack are two punchy tributes to the Rolling Stones - aptly timed to their "Bridges to Babylon" tour (here on Sunday) and vibrantly underscoring the versatile nature of the venerable rock 'n' roll band.
NEWS
July 4, 1997 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Johnny "Clyde" Copeland, 60, the hard-edged blues singer and guitarist whose intense, crowd-pleasing style and adventurous spirit earned him the nickname "the Texas Twister," died yesterday. Cardiologist Diane Mancini said Mr. Copeland died at 8 a.m. at Columbia-Presbyterian Hospital in New York of complications after heart-valve replacement surgery on June 26. After an 18-month wait, Mr. Copeland received a heart transplant on Jan. 1. He suffered from dilated cardiomyopathy - failure of the heart muscle - and was first stricken in March 1995.
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