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NEWS
July 15, 1998 | By Ken Dilanian, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
With little public notice or debate, the Ridge administration has privatized much of its system for inspecting Pennsylvania's 233 hospitals. Inspections of everything from hospital fire-safety plans to infection control are being conducted once every three years, instead of every other year. Most of the inspecting is not done by state regulators anymore. The task is in the hands of the nonprofit agency that accredits most of the nation's hospitals and is funded by the medical industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2013 | By Jordan Rau, KAISER HEALTH NEWS
How great a hospital is Lankenau Medical Center? Depends on whom you ask. The Wynnewood hospital is on Truven Health Analytics' "100 Top Hospitals" list. U.S. News and World Report calls Lankenau a "best" hospital in seven specialties. Healthgrades just gave it a "distinguished hospital award for clinical excellence. " "We've gotten tons of Healthgrades awards over the years," said Phil Robinson, Lankenau's president. On the other hand, the Joint Commission, a nonprofit organization that accredits hospitals, did not include Lankenau as one of its 620 national "top performers.
NEWS
June 25, 2009 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Soon after officials closed a poor-quality prostate cancer program at the Philadelphia VA Medical Center in mid-2008, the entire facility was accredited by the Joint Commission, the main group that assures quality at the nation's hospitals. During a hearing yesterday of the Senate Committee on Veterans Affairs, several senators wondered how the group could have given its imprimatur given that circumstance. "We need to pull back and take a look at this," responded Robert Wise, vice president of standards and survey methods for the Joint Commission.
NEWS
March 17, 1988 | By Susan FitzGerald and Steve Stecklow, Inquirer Staff Writers
The James C. Giuffre Medical Center, already under investigation by state and federal agencies for alleged malpractice, is now being probed by a private hospital accrediting organization, according to sources close to the hospital. A physician representing the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations made a surprise inspection last Thursday of the North Philadelphia facility, the sources said. The hospital was not due to be inspected until November 1989, according to Pamela Schumacher, a spokeswoman for the commission, which is based in Chicago.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1998 | By Josh Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Allegheny health system yesterday pointed to the positive results of a national commission's survey of Hahnemann hospital as proof that the fiscal crisis buffeting the system has not affected patient care. The unannounced inspection of Allegheny University Hospitals/Hahnemann in Center City was performed last Friday by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations. "We wanted to verify that the financial picture was not having any impact on patient care, so we sent a survey team in to make sure that care is still being provided," commission spokeswoman Janet McIntyre said yesterday.
NEWS
May 17, 1987 | By Andrea Hartley, Special to The Inquirer
Hampton Hospital in Rancocas, which opened its doors in September as the first psychiatric hospital built in New Jersey since 1910, recently received accreditation by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals. "We are proud that Hampton Hospital has achieved a three-year accreditation, the maximum length of time any facility can be awarded," said Charles A. Dackis, the hospital's medical director. The hospital, located on the Rancocas-Mount Holly Road, received the accreditation after evaluation by a team consisting of a psychiatrist, a psychiatric nurse and a psychiatric administrator, according to Ed Frye, spokesman for the joint commission.
NEWS
December 9, 2002 | By Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nurse Linda Aiken views hospitals as stubborn patients, disinclined to shake their unhealthy habits. One of their most worrisome practices: understaffing of nurses. The cost to hospitals of too few nurses, Aiken warns, is very high - more patients die and more nurses burn out. Aiken, of the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, has become one of the nation's leading voices for change in the way hospitals treat nurses and, by extension, their patients. Aiken backs her view with more than two decades of research that consistently leads to the same conclusion: Patients fare better in hospitals that heed nurses' advice about care.
NEWS
October 29, 2002 | By Suzanne Gordon
Anyone who has watched a hospitalized child, parent or friend pound uselessly on a call button understands the problem: As nurses must care for more and sicker people, the death and accident rate among patients goes up. For years, however, as nurses complained about the harm to patients from staff cuts, hospital managers and executives dismissed such worries as "anecdotal" or as disguised complaints about increased workloads. Finally, research has proved the nurses resoundingly correct.
NEWS
August 11, 2000 | By Lauren Mayk, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The union that represents more than 300 nurses at Rancocas Hospital is asking for state and national reviews of the facility. The hospital is "a hellhole for employees and now, we fear, a dangerous place for patients," union representatives said yesterday. They are seeking an injunction from the National Labor Relations Board to stop the latest round of layoffs at the hospital. Losing more employees, the union says, will exacerbate problems with staffing levels and jeopardize patient care.
NEWS
July 19, 1998 | By Ken Dilanian, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU Inquirer staff writer Stacey Burling contributed to this article
In May of last year, a state Health Department inspector arrived at Chestnut Hill Hospital to conduct a scheduled licensure inspection. The hospital's executives had another idea. Chestnut Hill's president, Cary Leptuck, told the regulator that a state inspection was not required. He said the hospital had agreed to provide the Health Department with its private accreditation report as evidence that it met state standards. The Philadelphia hospital had received high marks after its last private inspection - in 1995.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 29, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dorothea Daniels Glass, 92, a former Melrose Park resident who overcame prejudice against working women to become a respected specialist in rehabilitation medicine, died of heart failure Saturday, April 20, at her home in Palm City, Fla. "My mother walked into the room and you felt better," said her daughter, Deborah. "She was a trailblazer with class. " Known informally as Thea, Dr. Glass was born in New York City and graduated from Cornell University just before the start of World War II. Her mother and aunt had gone to medical school, and she wanted to follow suit.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2013 | By Jordan Rau, KAISER HEALTH NEWS
How great a hospital is Lankenau Medical Center? Depends on whom you ask. The Wynnewood hospital is on Truven Health Analytics' "100 Top Hospitals" list. U.S. News and World Report calls Lankenau a "best" hospital in seven specialties. Healthgrades just gave it a "distinguished hospital award for clinical excellence. " "We've gotten tons of Healthgrades awards over the years," said Phil Robinson, Lankenau's president. On the other hand, the Joint Commission, a nonprofit organization that accredits hospitals, did not include Lankenau as one of its 620 national "top performers.
NEWS
September 23, 2012 | By Anne Gearan, Washington Post
The United States and Pakistan are planning a joint effort to draw the Taliban toward peace talks in Afghanistan, an initiative that could help reconcile some militants and give Pakistan a say in the political future of its larger neighbor. A joint commission, or "action group," would help vet candidates for political rehabilitation, with a goal of helping Afghanistan frame a workable peace deal after U.S. and foreign forces leave. Officials familiar with the previously undisclosed plan described it on condition of anonymity because it is not final and because some aspects of U.S. outreach to the Taliban are classified.
NEWS
January 3, 2010 | By Christopher Yasiejko FOR THE INQUIRER
Forgive yourself if you enter the five-story Pavilion at Paoli Hospital and mistake it for the skylighted atrium of a grand mall. The centerpiece space of the $145 million facility, which opened in July, radiates the warmth of a coffeehouse. It's as welcoming to extended families as it is to intimate conversations. High above people whose thoughts are focused on some of life's most harrowing curveballs, eight towering chiffon mobiles sway with the circulating air. They range from 6 by 10 feet to 8 by 16 feet, and each displays two vertical, intersecting, archival-ink photographs of natural scenes: oak trees, ginkgo leaves, the colors of autumn-dyed trees reflected in water, pine needles, snow geese against a blue sky. "You'll see people just sitting there, staring at them," says Lindsey Felch.
NEWS
June 25, 2009 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Soon after officials closed a poor-quality prostate cancer program at the Philadelphia VA Medical Center in mid-2008, the entire facility was accredited by the Joint Commission, the main group that assures quality at the nation's hospitals. During a hearing yesterday of the Senate Committee on Veterans Affairs, several senators wondered how the group could have given its imprimatur given that circumstance. "We need to pull back and take a look at this," responded Robert Wise, vice president of standards and survey methods for the Joint Commission.
NEWS
March 22, 2004 | By Josh Goldstein and Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Twenty-one weeks into her pregnancy, Ceri Galati learned that the baby she was carrying had too many serious problems to survive. So Ceri Galati and her husband, Stephen Galati, made the agonizing decision to terminate the pregnancy. One week later, on Jan. 26, 2001, Shayla Everest Galati was induced from her mother's womb, stillborn at less than one pound. That was devastating enough, but her parents' grief did not end there. Two years later, the Galatis discovered that Shayla's body - which they had donated to Children's Hospital of Philadelphia for an autopsy to be quickly followed by cremation and burial - was still at the hospital.
NEWS
December 9, 2002 | By Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nurse Linda Aiken views hospitals as stubborn patients, disinclined to shake their unhealthy habits. One of their most worrisome practices: understaffing of nurses. The cost to hospitals of too few nurses, Aiken warns, is very high - more patients die and more nurses burn out. Aiken, of the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, has become one of the nation's leading voices for change in the way hospitals treat nurses and, by extension, their patients. Aiken backs her view with more than two decades of research that consistently leads to the same conclusion: Patients fare better in hospitals that heed nurses' advice about care.
NEWS
October 29, 2002 | By Suzanne Gordon
Anyone who has watched a hospitalized child, parent or friend pound uselessly on a call button understands the problem: As nurses must care for more and sicker people, the death and accident rate among patients goes up. For years, however, as nurses complained about the harm to patients from staff cuts, hospital managers and executives dismissed such worries as "anecdotal" or as disguised complaints about increased workloads. Finally, research has proved the nurses resoundingly correct.
NEWS
August 11, 2000 | By Lauren Mayk, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The union that represents more than 300 nurses at Rancocas Hospital is asking for state and national reviews of the facility. The hospital is "a hellhole for employees and now, we fear, a dangerous place for patients," union representatives said yesterday. They are seeking an injunction from the National Labor Relations Board to stop the latest round of layoffs at the hospital. Losing more employees, the union says, will exacerbate problems with staffing levels and jeopardize patient care.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1998 | By Josh Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Allegheny health system yesterday pointed to the positive results of a national commission's survey of Hahnemann hospital as proof that the fiscal crisis buffeting the system has not affected patient care. The unannounced inspection of Allegheny University Hospitals/Hahnemann in Center City was performed last Friday by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations. "We wanted to verify that the financial picture was not having any impact on patient care, so we sent a survey team in to make sure that care is still being provided," commission spokeswoman Janet McIntyre said yesterday.
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