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Jonathan Newman

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NEWS
April 21, 1998 | By Laura Barnhardt, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Local chapters of the NAACP held an emergency town meeting last night, and the leaders, activists and locals spoke about racial injustice that crosses county lines. They talked about national and local police brutality, inequalities in hiring practices, and divisions in communities. They spoke about reconciliation. They called upon one another to vote. But from the discussion, it was clear that if the 60 people gathered in the sanctuary of Agape Church last night had cast ballots then, Jonathan Newman, a Republican congressional candidate, and his former campaign chairman, Montgomery County Sheriff Frank Lalley, wouldn't have gotten many votes.
NEWS
January 15, 2004 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jonathan Newman, the 41-year-old son of a famous plastic surgeon and a state Supreme Court justice, could simply coast on his Main Line lineage. He has his expansive investment portfolio and, for fun, buys and sells racehorses. But he gave up a lucrative position as a corporate lawyer to take on one of the state's most powerful and least loved government agencies: the Liquor Control Board. In 18 months as board chairman, Newman has led a veritable capitalist revolution in a once moribund monopoly charged with purchasing, distributing and regulating liquor sales.
NEWS
April 16, 1998 | By Laura Barnhardt, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The NAACP chapters in Montgomery County, Bucks County and Philadelphia plan an emergency town meeting for Monday night to discuss racism in Montgomery County and Republican congressional candidate Jonathan Newman and county Sheriff Frank Lalley. Newman is singled out in the NAACP announcement for his anti-affirmative-action position and radio spots criticizing federal judicial nominee Frederica Massiah-Jackson. Lalley, Newman's former campaign chairman, is cited for an alleged racial slur that appears in the April issue of Philadelphia magazine.
NEWS
May 13, 1998 | By Laura Barnhardt, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Congressional candidate Melissa Brown yesterday wrote a $10,000 check to the favorite charity of fellow candidate Jonathan Newman, pinned it to the bulletin board in the pressroom at the Montgomery County Courthouse in Norristown, and issued a challenge: The check is Newman's, Brown said, if the allegations he has leveled against her in a radio advertisement can be substantiated. Last night, the check was still there. According to Newman's ad, "Melissa Brown wants to turn our health-care system over to the HMOs.
NEWS
March 3, 1998 | By Laura Barnhardt, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Usually, election season is almost over when the local airwaves are "Paid for by the campaign committee of . . . " But this year, the political ads signal that the campaign is just beginning - at least in the 13th Congressional District in Montgomery County, where four candidates are vying for the Republican nomination in the May 19 primary. The race already is promising to be the most expensive of its kind. It also may turn out to be one of the most advertised. Both will be due, in part, to Jonathan Newman, a Bryn Mawr lawyer called the race's million-dollar man. In January, campaign expense reports showed Newman already had almost half his $1 million goal for his first political foray.
NEWS
December 6, 2010 | By Joseph Tanfani, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a state Supreme Court justice desperate to find a way to build a new Family Court building in Center City, Sandra Schultz Newman hired real estate lawyer Jeffrey B. Rotwitt to make the project happen. Two years later, as Rotwitt's firm was closing in on a $3.9 million payday, Newman - by then a lawyer in private practice - tried to make sure some of the Family Court fees went to her son, a former lawyer in Rotwitt's firm. The former justice sent an e-mail to Rotwitt in March 2008 saying her son Jonathan, who introduced her to Rotwitt, should get credit for scoring the deal for the firm, Obermayer Rebmann Maxwell & Hippel.
NEWS
June 11, 2003
IDON'T know what all the fuss is about kids skateboarding. I say, give them someplace to do something they enjoy. And then you don't have to worry about them in the streets doing things they shouldn't be doing. I just think it's a shame that people would not want a place for the young people to do their thing. Mildred Raso, Philadelphia A family update Re "The Lamentable Story of Deitra Manigo" by Ronnie Polaneczky (May 23): It is important to make a correction to the statement regarding the father of her youngest child.
NEWS
June 5, 2003 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
THE historically moribund state liquor-control system is undergoing a historic overhaul at the hands of a man some might have seen as an improbable savior. Me? I never had any doubts. Jonathan Newman is that revolutionary. Remember when you first heard his name? It was in 1998, when he challenged Jon Fox in a GOP congressional primary in the 'burbs. Back then, he was best known for his famous parents: Mom Sandra is a Pennsylvania Supreme Court justice; father Jules is the world-famous "Dr. Nose.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2010
Here's a wine riddle for this era of recession drinking: How does a tasty Napa cabernet sell in the same marketplace for both $30 and $15? Answer: When discount wine innovator Jonathan Newman gets involved with the phenomenon of private labels. The ex-PLCB chairman has helped create more than 20 "private labels," like this 2007 Kingsford Manor cabernet, as an outlet for wineries to sell surplus cases of a vintage without damaging the established value of their franchise brand. In today's trade-down market, where $30 bottles languish on shelves, that means 4,000 cases, or about 25 percent of the cab inventory from this well-known (but confidentially unnamed)
NEWS
January 15, 2007 | DEBORAH LEAVY
WINE aficionados like to describe a fine wine as having the aroma of wild strawberries, or ripe peaches, perhaps with tobacco undertones, or citrus, or some such nonsense. But as a wine consumer, I think Gov. Rendell's naming of ex-State Sen. Joe Conti to be CEO of the state Liquor Control Board smells of something else: the stink of Harrisburg deal-making. The odor was enough to make Jonathan Newman, LCB chairman since 2002, resign in protest. They say that no good deed goes unpunished, and Jon Newman is a perfect example.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 14, 2012 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writer
She'll talk after all. After a six-month standoff, former state Supreme Court Justice Sandra Schultz Newman gave up the fight Thursday and said she would answer questions in a lawsuit over the controversial effort to build a new, $200 million Family Court building. Her reversal came one day after she appeared at a law office at the court-ordered time for a deposition and then refused to answer questions or turn over thousands of pages of documents. Newman has decided to waive her claim that she had immunity from the process, though she still believes that she has it, according to her lawyer, Gene D. Cohen.
NEWS
July 13, 2012 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writer
She showed up. She didn't complain about her health. But Sandra Schultz Newman, a former justice of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, still refused Wednesday to answer questions about her involvement with a botched plan to build a new $200 million Family Court building in Philadelphia. For six months, Newman had avoided answering questions from lawyer Richard A. Sprague, citing variously her busy personal and civic life, her winter vacation, and an unspecified sickness. But a judge had appeared to put an end to the delay in ordering her to undergo four days of depositions, starting Wednesday.
NEWS
August 3, 2011 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
The man who once had the greatest say over what alcohol Pennsylvanians could drink has thrown his support behind the effort to take that control away from government and end the State Store system. Jonathan Newman, the former chairman of the Liquor Control Board, said Tuesday that "the stars are perfectly aligned" to privatize the sale of wine and liquor in Pennsylvania - an endeavor that has failed under three previous governors. "This is the year change is going to happen," Newman said during a news conference at the Wine School of Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 3, 2011 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, benderw@phillynews.com 215-854-5255
MOMENTUM continued to build yesterday for dismantling the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board, with its former chairman blasting the "inherently wrong" government monopoly and endorsing the latest push to privatize the wine-and-spirits industry. "We don't want to be bootleggers," Jonathan Newman said during an appearance at the Wine School in Center City. "We don't want to have to be criminals, going into Delaware and New Jersey and purchasing product illegally. " Newman, who chaired the LCB from 2002 until 2007 and now sells wine to out-of-state retailers, pounced on a recent state audit showing that inventory mismanagement forced the agency to store tens of thousands of cases of booze in nontemperature-controlled trailers.
NEWS
August 2, 2011 | By Troy Graham, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The man who once had the greatest say over what alcohol Pennsylvanians could drink has thrown his support behind the effort to take that control away from government and end the State Store system. Jonathan Newman, the former chair of the state Liquor Control Board, said on Tuesday that "the stars are perfectly aligned" to privatize the sale of wine and hard liquor in Pennsylvania - an endeavor that has failed under three different governors. "This is the year change is going to happen," Newman said, during a news conference at the Wine School of Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 6, 2010 | By Joseph Tanfani, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a state Supreme Court justice desperate to find a way to build a new Family Court building in Center City, Sandra Schultz Newman hired real estate lawyer Jeffrey B. Rotwitt to make the project happen. Two years later, as Rotwitt's firm was closing in on a $3.9 million payday, Newman - by then a lawyer in private practice - tried to make sure some of the Family Court fees went to her son, a former lawyer in Rotwitt's firm. The former justice sent an e-mail to Rotwitt in March 2008 saying her son Jonathan, who introduced her to Rotwitt, should get credit for scoring the deal for the firm, Obermayer Rebmann Maxwell & Hippel.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2010
Here's a wine riddle for this era of recession drinking: How does a tasty Napa cabernet sell in the same marketplace for both $30 and $15? Answer: When discount wine innovator Jonathan Newman gets involved with the phenomenon of private labels. The ex-PLCB chairman has helped create more than 20 "private labels," like this 2007 Kingsford Manor cabernet, as an outlet for wineries to sell surplus cases of a vintage without damaging the established value of their franchise brand. In today's trade-down market, where $30 bottles languish on shelves, that means 4,000 cases, or about 25 percent of the cab inventory from this well-known (but confidentially unnamed)
NEWS
May 15, 2008 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
CHUCK Stone was legendary in these pages for, among other things, his role as the man to whom fugitives would turn when they were ready to submit to authorities. My goals aren't so lofty. I'd be content to play peacemaker between a prodigal wine-lover and his former employer in an effort to expand the selection available to those of us who like to imbibe here in Pennsylvania. I think I'm well- suited to play King Solomon. Jonathan Newman was a law-school classmate of mine at Penn.
NEWS
February 3, 2008 | By Craig LaBan INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
It is a case of vintage revenge. Wine merchants in Delaware and South Jersey are now clearing shelf space for their old nemesis: Jonathan Newman, former chairman of the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board. The "xChairman Selections," as one shop calls them, are the discounted wines that Newman's new company will introduce in Pennsylvania border states this month. Newman had risen to the unlikely status of folk hero among Pennsylvania wine lovers, partly because of his celebrated Chairman's Selection specials.
NEWS
February 1, 2007
Another reason provided for ending the LCB In an obvious move to discredit Jonathan Newman, former chairman of the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board, the Inquirer Jan. 26 informed us about the members of the Liquor Control Board traveling lavishly on the backs of the taxpayers ("Liquor board did high-end traveling"). In most cases their trips were to negotiate a purchase price for wine either already cheaper in other states or, as previously disclosed in The Inquirer, created for Pennsylvania to look as if it were specially priced.
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