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Jonathan Richman

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1986 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
Summer's here, the concert scene is bursting with big-name rock acts, a slew of superstar albums are about to hit the stores - it's time for . . . Jonathan Richman? Yes, and what a blessed relief the wryly understated music of Richman can be in this time of frantic rock-music activity. Richman's new album - the oh-so-aptly titled It's Time for Jonathan Richman (Upside Records) - coincides with the re-release of all of Richman's previous albums, a noble effort overseen by the Los Angeles independent label Rhino Records.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2001 | By SARA SHERR For the Daily News
ROCK AND SOUL dance party Making Time is now monthly at Transit (10 p.m. tomorrow, 6th and Spring Garden streets, 215-925-8878, www.soundway.com, $8). The main, all-ages floor is Brit-pop and indie dance from Sorted; in the basement, The Turnaround has the funk. The second floor, domain of Rock and Roll Overdose, adds new wave and electro-pop as Automatic Analog. German electronic duo Oval is at the Rotunda (7 p.m. tomorrow, 4012 Walnut St., 215-629-2626, www.r5productions.com, $8)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2000 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
In 1995, when England's Elastica broke out all over stateside radio with "Connection" - sounding like Romeo Void shouting along to Wire on the headphones - the group was a kicky new wave oasis in the joyless desert of grunge. The fallout from overnight stardom - drugs, internal dissent, abortive recording sessions, and the very public break-up of Elastica leader Justine Frischmann and Blur frontman Damon Albarn - conspired to delay the arrival of a followup album for five years. That album, The Menace, sounds like, well, an oasis of kicky new wave in a joyless desert of rap-metal.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1986 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
The local group BaBa Lou has released an album, BaBa Lou at Bob's (El K'Bong ) that is steeped in the finest rock-and-roll a cappella tradition, from Dion and the Belmonts to Jonathan Richman. The fellows in BaBa Lou like to present themselves as good-time frat boys, but their music's great strength is that its pervasive sense of humor isn't collegiate. Instead, the group uses its mostly acoustic instrumentation and clear, conversational voices to sing about the usual stuff (girls, cars and rock-and-roll itself)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2004 | By SARA SHERR For the Daily News
Trouble Everyday, which can hold its own opening for the Buzzcocks - or probably any New York hipster band - has a debut album, "Days vs. Nights," and limited editions designed by Heads of State are available at tonight's record release bash at the Khyber with the Deadly and Low Budgets (9, 56 S. 2nd St., $6, 215-238-5888, www.thekhyber.com). Trouble Everyday is also playing a benefit for Radio Volta at the Rotunda with Adam12, Betsy Spivak, Dev79, Kiss Kiss Kill and Suzy Q (7 to 11 p.m. Sunday, 4014 Walnut St., 215-573-3234, $5, all ages, www.radiovolta.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1996 | By Sara Sherr, FOR THE INQUIRER Dan DeLuca and Fred Beckley also contributed
The charm of Jonathan Richman is that he makes basic rock and roll that reveals more with what's not said than with what is. For example, last year's album, You Must Ask the Heart (Rounder), took inspiration from Walter Johnson, a Hall of Fame pitcher from the early 1900s, when baseball was about people, not salaries ("Was there bitterness in Walter Johnson?/Well, it was never detected" is the song's poignant, understated refrain). Richman lets his playful, adventurous songs speak for themselves without blustery attitude or weighty metaphors.
NEWS
October 14, 2008 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
Few musicians take as much unfettered glee in the sheer act of performance as Jonathan Richman. At the First Unitarian Church on Sunday night, Richman frequently stepped away from the microphone and put down his guitar to dance. As his body twisted and bucked (the crowd was particularly fond of his sweeping high kicks), his eyes were wide and distant, as if he'd been swept away by his own songs. Richman, 57, is best known for the albums he made with Boston's Modern Lovers, particularly their self-titled 1976 debut, which married brute garage rock to Richman's naive romanticism.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2013
Kelly Willis and Bruce Robison In a preferable Austin, Texas-focused alternative universe, Faith Hill and Tim McGraw would be shunted aside and wife-and-husband team Kelly Willis and Bruce Robison would be the first couple of country music. Back in the '90s, Willis flirted with Nashville mainstream success, but the star-making machinery rubbed her the wrong way, and she brought her honkytonk angel voice back home to the Lone Star State and married Robison, a big, sensitive lug of a hardscrabble singer-songwriter who has scripted hits for George Strait, the Dixie Chicks, and, yes, Faith Hill and Tim McGraw.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
He might be the most droll songwriter in indie-pop, and on songs like "Waiting for Kirsten" from last year's EP An Argument With Myself or "I Want a Pair of Cowboy Boots" from his new album I Know What Love Isn't , the Swedish singer can be a veritable laugh riot. But don't get the idea that Jens Lekman is not a serious man. "I like telling stories with a sense of humor," says Lekman, who will play a show with his band at Union Transfer on Thursday night. "But humor can also distance you from the subject you're writing about.
NEWS
October 14, 2008 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
Few musicians take as much unfettered glee in the sheer act of performance as Jonathan Richman. At the First Unitarian Church on Sunday night, Richman frequently stepped away from the microphone and put down his guitar to dance. As his body twisted and bucked (the crowd was particularly fond of his sweeping high kicks), his eyes were wide and distant, as if he'd been swept away by his own songs. Richman, 57, is best known for the albums he made with Boston's Modern Lovers, particularly their self-titled 1976 debut, which married brute garage rock to Richman's naive romanticism.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2004 | By SARA SHERR For the Daily News
Trouble Everyday, which can hold its own opening for the Buzzcocks - or probably any New York hipster band - has a debut album, "Days vs. Nights," and limited editions designed by Heads of State are available at tonight's record release bash at the Khyber with the Deadly and Low Budgets (9, 56 S. 2nd St., $6, 215-238-5888, www.thekhyber.com). Trouble Everyday is also playing a benefit for Radio Volta at the Rotunda with Adam12, Betsy Spivak, Dev79, Kiss Kiss Kill and Suzy Q (7 to 11 p.m. Sunday, 4014 Walnut St., 215-573-3234, $5, all ages, www.radiovolta.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2001 | By SARA SHERR For the Daily News
This week is a Philadelphia indie rock family reunion of sorts, and pretty much anything else of note is crammed into the next three days, so get ready: The Chris Shepard Experience, the namesake of the former Bellevue member, resurfaced over the summer with the varied soundscapes of "Glow in the Dark," which ranges from Brother JT-esque psychedelic freakouts to pastoral strumming. His new sounds are at www.shepmusic.com. Catch him at 10 tonight at John and Peter's with the Alley (96 S. Main St., New Hope, 215-862-5981)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2000 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
In 1995, when England's Elastica broke out all over stateside radio with "Connection" - sounding like Romeo Void shouting along to Wire on the headphones - the group was a kicky new wave oasis in the joyless desert of grunge. The fallout from overnight stardom - drugs, internal dissent, abortive recording sessions, and the very public break-up of Elastica leader Justine Frischmann and Blur frontman Damon Albarn - conspired to delay the arrival of a followup album for five years. That album, The Menace, sounds like, well, an oasis of kicky new wave in a joyless desert of rap-metal.
NEWS
October 29, 1999 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Here's good news for devotees of in-your-face, striving-for-glory pop music - the kind that picks you up, turns you over and shakes all the loose change out of your pockets and brains. Psyche-piercing singer/composer Adam Duritz still isn't satisfied, still hasn't settled down, still hasn't lost the flame that's made Counting Crows one of the most passionate, honest and humane of American guitar-rock bands of the 1990s. Proof is all over the group's third studio album, "This Desert Life," which hits stores Tuesday, the night before the group plays the Tower Theater in Upper Darby.
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