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LIVING
January 29, 1998 | By Steve Goldstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
When Vernon E. Jordan Jr. stood before microphones and cameras in a hotel ballroom last week and quoted the biblical admonition, "To whom much is given, much is required," some members of the vast Washington legal community chuckled and rolled their eyes. It seemed an unlikely explanation for why Jordan, power broker supreme and Clinton friend without peer, admitted to having helped a 24-year-old intern find a job. Not only because the former civil rights leader has been criticized by at least one prominent black leader for trading his previous career - and his principles - for a life of privilege.
NEWS
July 3, 1986 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marple Township Commissioner Robert Jordan had gone to court expecting to face a jury of his peers on charges stemming from an altercation in the township building Jan. 15. Instead, the charges were dropped, apparently ending what Jordan's attorney, John M. Gallagher Jr., described as "this whole little mess. " Patricia Keates, president of the Marple Board of Commissioners, along with her husband, Robert, and library board member Maureen Muehsam dropped complaints charging Jordan with simple assault and terroristic threats just as Jordan's trial was scheduled to begin Monday in Delaware County Court, Media.
SPORTS
March 19, 1995 | By Mike Bruton, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After Michael Jordan announced his comeback yesterday, the world of television shifted into overdrive. NBC, the NBA's primary network, immediately began to make changes to today's edition of The NBA on NBC to capitalize on the return of the man many call the greatest player to ever step on a basketball court. Ironically, NBC already had the game between the Chicago Bulls and the Indiana Pacers scheduled for noon today before Jordan made his decision to return to the Bulls.
SPORTS
April 17, 1998 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
When Michael Jordan walks away from basketball, at the end of this season or whenever, exactly what does the NBA lose? Its best player. Sellouts. TV ratings. Income. Charisma. All of the above. "We'd lose the only household name in basketball," said the Sixers' Scott Williams, who spent the first four seasons of his career as a teammate of Jordan with the Chicago Bulls. "People who don't know anything about basketball know him. " People who don't know anything else about the league know that Jordan, a free agent-to-be, has said he will return to the Bulls only under certain circumstances.
SPORTS
October 13, 1999 | By Peter Nolan, FOR THE INQUIRER
When Penncrest's Josh Jordan sets his mind on accomplishing something, it is a pretty good bet the cross-country runner is going to get the job done. At the Delaware County Championships at Rose Tree Park in Media, the junior kept repeating a simple, but powerful, message. "When I got there, I looked at everyone else and I said to myself 'I came here to win,' and I just kept repeating that to myself. " And win he did, posting a time of 16 minutes, 2 seconds, his best of the year and 30 seconds faster than his finish a year ago. "Josh just had it that day," Penncrest coach John Baker said.
SPORTS
May 26, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The Chicago Bulls' Michael Jordan capped a season of honors yesterday by capturing the NBA's most valuable player award. He became the first player to win MVP and defensive player of the year honors the same season. But Jordan still has not reached his primary goal - bringing the NBA championship to Chicago. Jordan, who averaged 35.0 points per game to lead the league in scoring for the second consecutive season, was golfing in the Carolinas and could not even be reached by his own team to be congratulated, Krause said.
SPORTS
February 1, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
Only Michael Jordan, and only in Cleveland. Jordan did it to the Cavaliers and their fans again, hitting an 18-foot jumper at the buzzer last night to give the Washington Wizards a 93-92 win. Jordan victimized Cleveland throughout his career with the Chicago Bulls, and although he's now wearing a Washington jersey, No. 23 still has the Cavs' number. "Everybody in the place knew where the ball was going," Jordan said. "I've had some big shots in Cleveland, and they keep going in. " With 1.6 seconds left and Washington down, 92-91, Jordan got free on a defensive switch and calmly drained his jumper for the Wizards, who trailed by 12 points in the fourth quarter.
SPORTS
August 2, 1994 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
If Michael Jordan hits a home run and it's not on video, did it happen? The Birmingham Barons outfielder, whose career highlights so far have been filmed inside NBA arenas, hopes to find a videotape of his first professional home run. Jordan's homer at Hoover (Ala.) Stadium on Saturday came so late in the evening that local television photographers had already packed up. "It was the bottom of the eighth and a late night," said team spokesman Chris Pika. "We would like to have a copy of it, and I think Michael would, too. " So the Barons are trying to get the word out to anyone in the record crowd of 13,751 who might have had a camera running when Jordan hit his homer.
SPORTS
December 4, 1998 | by Kevin Mulligan, Daily News Sports Writer
With Michael Jordan back in the Big Apple, this NBA labor talk thing was perceived to be growing serious. Perceptions, of course, have been known to disappoint. David Falk, agent of His Airness, did say Jordan wouldn't become involved again until he thought discussions aimed at breaking the five-month-old NBA labor stalemate reached a more serious stage. Jordan's silky touch didn't seem to have much effect yesterday, with no new proposals offered in meetings between league and union officials in New York that didn't end until nearly midnight.
SPORTS
September 16, 1991 | By Dick Polman, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he heard the news that John Kruk had been signed for three years at $7.2 million, he had mixed feelings - understandably so. Basically, he was happy for his teammate. But he wasn't so happy for himself. As Ricky Jordan put it yesterday, "(Kruk) is a good player, and he deserves what he got. As you know, the guy can play some first base. People talk about Andres Galarraga and Will Clark, but I think he's one of the top three. He can hit and play defense. It's no surprise that they wanted to sign him. " But Jordan knows what this means for him: another season in limbo.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
July 22, 2015 | By Mike Kern, Daily News Columnist
OK, SO Jordan Spieth didn't become the youngest player to win golf's oldest major since 1893. Nor did he become only the second man, and first since fellow Texan Ben Hogan 62 years ago, to win the first three modern-era majors in a season. It means he can't win the Grand Slam, something only Bobby Jones in 1930 has ever been able to pull off. Instead, like Arnold Palmer in 1960 and Jack Nicklaus a dozen years later, Spieth's pursuit of immortality came to an end by a single shot at the Open Championship.
SPORTS
July 21, 2015 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
ST. ANDREWS, Scotland - No amateur has won the Open Championship since Bobby Jones was immortalizing himself by sweeping the grand slam in 1930. The last time an amateur won any major was Johnny Goodman at the 1933 U.S. Open. The last amateur who even led a major after 54 holes was Jim Simons in the 1971 U.S. Open at Merion, where he was two clear of Jack Nicklaus heading into the fourth round before finishing three shots out of a timeless playoff. That's the kind of history 22-year-old Irishman Paul Dunne will be chasing today at the Old Course, when the game's oldest major will finally come to an end albeit a day late for the first time since 1988.
NEWS
July 17, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
BETHLEHEM, Pa. - Jordan Spieth wasn't wearing the University of Texas' burnt orange when he met the British Open media Wednesday, but his home-state connections were obvious anyway. The thoughtful answers of the golfing phenom, who beginning Thursday is aiming for a third consecutive major championship after winning the Masters and U.S. Open earlier this year, had a slight Southwest twang, and when the subject of Fort Worth legend Ben Hogan was raised, his tone turned reverent. Yet for all his Lone Star loyalty, it may be the 21-year-old's Pennsylvania roots - less-known but as deep as a St. Andrews pot bunker - that on the eve of his history-making Old Course quest better explain Spieth's rapid rise to golf's summit.
SPORTS
July 17, 2015 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
ST. ANDREWS, Scotland - There's no way Jordan Spieth can possibly complete golf's calendar Grand Slam, right? Not at 21. Or probably any other age. Why? Well, because it's never been done in the modern era. He's halfway there, having gone wire-to-wire in April at the Masters (where he tied Tiger Woods' scoring record) before taking last month's U.S. Open by a shot when Dustin Johnson three-putted the 72nd green. Last week he won in a playoff at the John Deere, in his first start since Chambers Bay, even though a bunch of folks figured he would have been better off getting to the Old Course earlier to properly prepare for the third major of the season.
SPORTS
June 23, 2015 | BY MARCUS HAYES, Daily News Staff Writer hayesm@phillynews.com
UNIVERSITY PLACE, Wash. - Roar. Roar. Roar. As Jordan Spieth ticked off the second leg of what has become his Grand Slam quest and Dustin Johnson added another chapter to his legacy of disappoinment, the largest grandstand in U.S. Open history hardly could have asked for better theater. Six thousand had seats to one of the more thrilling finishes in major championship history. Louie Oosthuizen posted a 4-under with a sweet birdie putt ( ROAR ) . . . right about the time Spieth drooped from 6-under to 4 with a double-bogey on 17. Spieth then launched his second shot to the par-5 18th, straight and true; it rolled onto the green, up the back slope and swept by the right edge, leaving him 15 feet for eagle and two putts for the lead ( ROAR )
SPORTS
June 19, 2015 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Columnist
JORDAN MATTHEWS was ticked. He had run the sideline pass route cleanly, but the ball arrived a little late and a little high, and by the time he jumped and extended all of his 6-3 frame to haul it in, a defensive back was upon him and there was no room to run. And thus, no first down. So, as Matthews ran from the field, the sound of his frustration carried out across the practice fields of the NovaCare Complex. Carried, literally, into the streets. "That's nothing," he said after the second day of minicamp had come to an end. "That's just competing.
SPORTS
June 7, 2015 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
St. John's announced Friday that Rysheed Jordan, who starred at Vaux High School and played two seasons for the Red Storm, has decided to pursue a professional basketball career. Jordan is ineligible for the NBA draft, so he will not be allowed to play in the league next season. But he is eligible to play in the NBA Development League or in another country's professional league. The 6-foot-4 guard and Philadelphia native averaged 12 points and three assists in 60 career games. "Playing professional basketball has always been a goal of mine.
SPORTS
May 26, 2015 | By Aaron Carter, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Roberts Vaux High basketball standout Rysheed Jordan could be ruled academically ineligible to play for St. John's this fall, according to a report by the New York Daily News. The 6-foot-4 guard would be the team's leading returning scorer if he comes back for his junior season. He averaged 14.1 points and a team-high 3.1 assists last season. According to the report, there is a chance that Jordan will not return to the team at all, although he is expected to meet with new St. John's coach Chris Mullin soon.
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kadiatou Diallo. Valerie Bell. Lesley McSpadden. Wanda Johnson. Carol Gray. Samaria Rice. They are among mothers whose sons have died in police-related violence. At that moment of loss and mourning, says photographer and educator Denise Allen, the media place a microphone in front of these mothers so they can talk about their dead sons. Allen has created "My Son Matters!," a project on display at the Mt. Airy Art Garage until the end of May. Striking portraits of black mothers with their sons decorate the gallery.
SPORTS
May 12, 2015 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
DONALD SPIETH remembers making the trip from Bethlehem to Dallas to visit his son Shawn's family when his grandson Jordan, the oldest of three children, was around "10 or 12. " He was there at the same time the PGA Tour's AT&T Byron Nelson Golf Championship was being played, which was hardly coincidental. And it was then when he first became aware that Jordan could have some kind of a future swinging golf clubs. "I knew he was taking the sport seriously, playing a lot," the elder Spieth said.
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