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LIVING
January 29, 1998 | By Steve Goldstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
When Vernon E. Jordan Jr. stood before microphones and cameras in a hotel ballroom last week and quoted the biblical admonition, "To whom much is given, much is required," some members of the vast Washington legal community chuckled and rolled their eyes. It seemed an unlikely explanation for why Jordan, power broker supreme and Clinton friend without peer, admitted to having helped a 24-year-old intern find a job. Not only because the former civil rights leader has been criticized by at least one prominent black leader for trading his previous career - and his principles - for a life of privilege.
NEWS
July 3, 1986 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marple Township Commissioner Robert Jordan had gone to court expecting to face a jury of his peers on charges stemming from an altercation in the township building Jan. 15. Instead, the charges were dropped, apparently ending what Jordan's attorney, John M. Gallagher Jr., described as "this whole little mess. " Patricia Keates, president of the Marple Board of Commissioners, along with her husband, Robert, and library board member Maureen Muehsam dropped complaints charging Jordan with simple assault and terroristic threats just as Jordan's trial was scheduled to begin Monday in Delaware County Court, Media.
SPORTS
March 19, 1995 | By Mike Bruton, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After Michael Jordan announced his comeback yesterday, the world of television shifted into overdrive. NBC, the NBA's primary network, immediately began to make changes to today's edition of The NBA on NBC to capitalize on the return of the man many call the greatest player to ever step on a basketball court. Ironically, NBC already had the game between the Chicago Bulls and the Indiana Pacers scheduled for noon today before Jordan made his decision to return to the Bulls.
SPORTS
April 17, 1998 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
When Michael Jordan walks away from basketball, at the end of this season or whenever, exactly what does the NBA lose? Its best player. Sellouts. TV ratings. Income. Charisma. All of the above. "We'd lose the only household name in basketball," said the Sixers' Scott Williams, who spent the first four seasons of his career as a teammate of Jordan with the Chicago Bulls. "People who don't know anything about basketball know him. " People who don't know anything else about the league know that Jordan, a free agent-to-be, has said he will return to the Bulls only under certain circumstances.
SPORTS
October 13, 1999 | By Peter Nolan, FOR THE INQUIRER
When Penncrest's Josh Jordan sets his mind on accomplishing something, it is a pretty good bet the cross-country runner is going to get the job done. At the Delaware County Championships at Rose Tree Park in Media, the junior kept repeating a simple, but powerful, message. "When I got there, I looked at everyone else and I said to myself 'I came here to win,' and I just kept repeating that to myself. " And win he did, posting a time of 16 minutes, 2 seconds, his best of the year and 30 seconds faster than his finish a year ago. "Josh just had it that day," Penncrest coach John Baker said.
SPORTS
May 26, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The Chicago Bulls' Michael Jordan capped a season of honors yesterday by capturing the NBA's most valuable player award. He became the first player to win MVP and defensive player of the year honors the same season. But Jordan still has not reached his primary goal - bringing the NBA championship to Chicago. Jordan, who averaged 35.0 points per game to lead the league in scoring for the second consecutive season, was golfing in the Carolinas and could not even be reached by his own team to be congratulated, Krause said.
SPORTS
February 1, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
Only Michael Jordan, and only in Cleveland. Jordan did it to the Cavaliers and their fans again, hitting an 18-foot jumper at the buzzer last night to give the Washington Wizards a 93-92 win. Jordan victimized Cleveland throughout his career with the Chicago Bulls, and although he's now wearing a Washington jersey, No. 23 still has the Cavs' number. "Everybody in the place knew where the ball was going," Jordan said. "I've had some big shots in Cleveland, and they keep going in. " With 1.6 seconds left and Washington down, 92-91, Jordan got free on a defensive switch and calmly drained his jumper for the Wizards, who trailed by 12 points in the fourth quarter.
SPORTS
August 2, 1994 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
If Michael Jordan hits a home run and it's not on video, did it happen? The Birmingham Barons outfielder, whose career highlights so far have been filmed inside NBA arenas, hopes to find a videotape of his first professional home run. Jordan's homer at Hoover (Ala.) Stadium on Saturday came so late in the evening that local television photographers had already packed up. "It was the bottom of the eighth and a late night," said team spokesman Chris Pika. "We would like to have a copy of it, and I think Michael would, too. " So the Barons are trying to get the word out to anyone in the record crowd of 13,751 who might have had a camera running when Jordan hit his homer.
SPORTS
December 4, 1998 | by Kevin Mulligan, Daily News Sports Writer
With Michael Jordan back in the Big Apple, this NBA labor talk thing was perceived to be growing serious. Perceptions, of course, have been known to disappoint. David Falk, agent of His Airness, did say Jordan wouldn't become involved again until he thought discussions aimed at breaking the five-month-old NBA labor stalemate reached a more serious stage. Jordan's silky touch didn't seem to have much effect yesterday, with no new proposals offered in meetings between league and union officials in New York that didn't end until nearly midnight.
SPORTS
September 16, 1991 | By Dick Polman, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he heard the news that John Kruk had been signed for three years at $7.2 million, he had mixed feelings - understandably so. Basically, he was happy for his teammate. But he wasn't so happy for himself. As Ricky Jordan put it yesterday, "(Kruk) is a good player, and he deserves what he got. As you know, the guy can play some first base. People talk about Andres Galarraga and Will Clark, but I think he's one of the top three. He can hit and play defense. It's no surprise that they wanted to sign him. " But Jordan knows what this means for him: another season in limbo.
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SPORTS
January 27, 2016 | By Sam Carchidi, STAFF WRITER
For Jordan Weal, the wait finally ended. The rookie forward, acquired from Los Angeles on Jan. 6, made his Flyers debut against visiting Boston on Monday. Sam Gagner, who played one game after being recalled from Lehigh Valley, was a healthy scratch. Weal was part of the deal that sent Vinny Lecavalier (four goals in nine games with the Kings) and Luke Schenn (minus-1 in nine games) to Los Angeles. "Jordan has worked for that opportunity," coach Dave Hakstol said before the game.
SPORTS
January 3, 2016 | By Zach Berman, STAFF WRITER
After Jeremy Maclin left the Eagles in free agency, Jordan Matthews said the team would not have a No. 1 receiver this season, utilizing a balanced receiving corps. Fifteen games into the season, Matthews' prediction did not come true. He became the No. 1 receiver. Matthews, a second-round pick in 2014, needs 57 receiving yards Sunday against the New York Giants to reach the 1,000-yard plateau. He would become the 13th player in franchise history to achieve that total. His 78 catches rank eighth on the Eagles' single-season list, and he needs seven catches Sunday to match Maclin's reception total from last season.
NEWS
January 3, 2016
Doris C. Halaby, 97, whose husband was the administrator of what is now the Federal Aviation Administration under Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson, and whose daughter became the queen of Jordan, died Dec. 25 at another daughter's home in Washington. The cause was pneumonia, said Queen Noor. Mrs. Halaby was born Doris Carlquist in Leavenworth, Wash., where her father was mayor. As a child, she moved with her family to Anchorage, decades before Alaska became a state. She was a political science graduate of the University of Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's Jordan Smith, of course Was there ever any doubt Jordan Smith would take home the crown on NBC's The Voice this season? The 22-year-old Kentuckian, who learned the ropes singing at his Harlan County church, was declared the winner Tuesday night on the second of a two-episode season finale. Smith, who was coached by Adam Levine , on Monday scored the Nos. 1 and 3 hits on iTunes with a rousing - some would say bombastic - performance of The Sound of Music 's "Climb Ev'ry Mountain" and a soulful rendition of "Mary, Did You Know?"
SPORTS
December 16, 2015 | By Aaron Carter, Staff Writer
Imhotep senior Jordan McCray could have copped an attitude, been a disruptive and disgruntled player or just flat-out transferred. McCray possesses the size, speed and athleticism to play linebacker in college somewhere next season. The problem is that the 6-foot-2, 210-pounder plays defensive end really well for the Panthers, who will play District 10 Cathedral Prep in the Class AAA state championship Friday night at Hersheypark Stadium. "I thought about it like I really need to play linebacker because if that's what [college]
SPORTS
December 4, 2015 | By Aaron Carter, Inquirer Staff Writer
A furious comeback was not enough to overcome a sluggish start Wednesday night as La Salle fell, 84-80, to visiting Hofstra, which earned coach Joe Mihalich his 300th win. Jordan Price led the Explorers with a career-high 37 points, including 24 in the second half, but the Explorers' supporting players couldn't muster enough offensive help. La Salle trailed, 50-33, with 17 minutes left before rallying. The Explorers (4-2) used a 10-2 run to get within 78-77, but Cleon Roberts missed a chance to tie the score, missing a free throw with 1 minute, 15 seconds remaining.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2015 | Gary Thompson, Daily News Staff Writer
Drink your eggs and do your one-arm push-ups, people - looks like we'll be going several more happy rounds with "Rocky. " The new spinoff, "Creed," looks like it has legs - a movie that reminds us why we loved the original, made by people who obviously cherish it as much as we do. "Creed" (in theaters today) takes us back to Rocky the striver, the guy wanting to go the distance, to prove something, if only to himself. This time his name is Adonis Creed (Michael B. Jordan), an L.A. kid introduced to us in a lengthy prologue - illegitimate son of Apollo Creed, disowned, raised in foster homes, adopted belatedly by Apollo's wife (Phylicia Rashad)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2015 | Gary Thompson, Daily News
You don't have to explain to Ryan Coogler why people of every age, race, gender and nationality run up the Rocky steps. Coogler, an African-American man born and bred in Oakland, Calif., inherited his "Rocky" love from his father, who inherited it from his mother - three generations have found the movie a source of powerful, personal inspiration. "My dad watched my mom pass away from complications of breast cancer," Coogler said. "Near the end, the only thing they could do together was watch TV, and it so happened the "Rocky" movies were on a lot, and that became a deep bond for them.
SPORTS
November 25, 2015 | BY DICK JERARDI, Daily News Staff Writer jerardd@phillynews.com
JORDAN PRICE scored 14 points in the first 5 minutes, on four threes and a breakaway layup. Playing against Lafayette, which lost three 1,000-point scorers from the Patriot League champions, Monday night at Gola Arena really felt like the night when Price, a born scorer, might go off for 50. He settled for a very calm 33 as La Salle beat Lafayette, 83-75, in a game that was never really in doubt as the Explorers led from the start. "Somebody asked if he was looking to (score)
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