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Joseph Kony

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NEWS
March 9, 2012 | By Jason Straziuso and Rodney Muhumuza, Associated Press
KAMPALA, Uganda - The young American boy sums up what his father does for a living: "You stop the bad guys from being mean. " Yes, the father says, but who are the bad guys? The child thinks, then offers a guess: " Star Wars people?" Though a galaxy away from this preschooler's American upbringing, the truth is far more sinister. The bad guys are Joseph Kony and his Lord's Resistance Army (LRA), a brutal Central Africa militia that has kidnapped thousands of children and forced them to become sex slaves, fight as child soldiers, and kill family members.
NEWS
July 12, 2010 | Inquirer Staff Report
A Wilmington, Del., man is among those killed Sunday in a pair of bombings in Uganda that officials believe were carried out by Islamic extremists. Nate Henn, 25, worked with Invisible Children, a San Diego-based organization that publicizes the plight of child soldiers in East Africa and helps former youth combatants. On his Facebook page, Henn lists Wilmington as his hometown and said he was a 2007 graduate of the University of Delaware and a 2003 graduate of Concord High School.
NEWS
August 16, 2006
President Bush should seize a rare, fragile opportunity to stop the civil war in Uganda that has ravaged children for two decades. The rebel Lord's Resistance Army, led by Joseph Kony, has kidnapped at least 30,000 children who were forced to become soldiers and sex slaves. Current talks between the rebels and the Ugandan government are the best chance ever to find peace, due to the mediating role being played by the regional government in southern Sudan, where Kony finds haven.
NEWS
August 5, 2012 | By Matthew Lee, Associated Press
ENTEBBE, Uganda - U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said Friday that she hopes drones will soon be able to see through jungle cover so they can locate warlord Joseph Kony. Clinton made the remark in Uganda as she watched a small U.S.-made drone that the Ugandan military uses in Somalia to fight al-Qaeda-linked militants. The United States last year sent 100 special-forces advisers to Central Africa to help hunt Kony, the leader of the Lord's Resistance Army, a band of jungle-roaming militants known for kidnapping children, taking girls as sex slaves, and disfiguring victims.
NEWS
October 16, 2011 | By Mark S. Smith, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - President Obama said Friday that he was dispatching roughly 100 U.S. troops to central Africa to help battle the Lord's Resistance Army, which the administration accuses of a campaign of murder, rape, and kidnapping children that spans two decades. In a letter to Congress, Obama said the troops would act as advisers in efforts to hunt down rebel leader Joseph Kony but would not engage in combat except in self-defense. Pentagon officials said the bulk of the U.S. contingent would be special operations troops, who will provide security and combat training to African units.
NEWS
March 14, 2012 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stop a brutal thug who has killed, raped, and terrorized children for decades. Why would anyone take issue with that goal? But a cyclone of controversy is swirling around Kony 2012 , a video by a San Diego-based nonprofit called Invisible Children. The video targets brutal Ugandan-born militia leader Joseph Kony and has gotten more than 76 million views on YouTube since it was posted March 5. Some say that Invisible Children's leaders are a bunch of self-promoting, overprivileged young adults, others that they are brilliant filmmaker/advocates who know how to use new-media tools to grab the attention of high school and college students.
NEWS
October 15, 2011 | By Mark S. Smith, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - President Obama said Friday he's dispatching roughly 100 U.S. troops to central Africa to support the battle against a guerrilla group accused of widespread atrocities, but he stressed they're being sent to advise, not to join the fight. In a letter to Congress, Obama said the troops would act as advisers in a long-running battle against the Lord's Resistance Army and help to hunt down its notorious leader, Joseph Kony. He said they would not engage in combat except in self-defense.
NEWS
April 25, 2012 | By Rodney Muhumuza, Associated Press
DJEMA, Central African Republic - An Internet campaign that has gone viral aims to capture the notorious rebel leader Joseph Kony, but Ugandan foot soldiers who have spent years searching for the man are starting to ask a question their top commanders prefer to ignore: Is it possible he is dead? Ugandan army officials say the Lord's Resistance Army leader is alive and hiding somewhere within the Central African Republic. Rank-and-file soldiers, however, say intelligence on Kony is so limited that if he dies, or is already dead, his foes might never know and could wind up chasing a ghost through this vast Central Africa jungle.
NEWS
June 28, 2012 | By Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A House panel on Wednesday approved legislation that would expand the State Department's rewards for justice program to target the world's most serious human-rights abusers, with African warlord Joseph Kony a top target. In a rare moment of bipartisanship, Democratic and Republican members of the Foreign Affairs Committee adopted a bill that would authorize operations for the State Department and speed up the process for U.S. arms sales overseas. The voice vote approval reflected the desire of both parties to complete such a broad-based State Department bill for the first time in a decade.
NEWS
April 4, 2013
War-crimes hunt for Kony on hold NAIROBI, Kenya - The Ugandan military has suspended its hunt for war-crimes suspect Joseph Kony and his Lord's Resistance Army, delivering a major setback to capturing a warlord accused in the abductions of tens of thousands of children over the last three decades. Wednesday's announcement came days after rebels seized power in the Central African Republic, where Kony is said to be hiding, and then refused to cooperate with Ugandan troops stationed in the country.
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NEWS
March 18, 2014 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seven years after she left Philadelphia, Jennifer Anyayo is preparing for the exam she must pass to keep moving toward college in her homeland of Uganda. She's being tested in another momentous way. She's a new mother - and loves it. "Sometimes when I'm carrying her," Anyayo said in a telephone interview, "I will be very serious and she will look at me, and she will smile and I smile back. " Anyayo's guiding light remains Abitimo Odongkara, the educator who spent decades shuttling between Philadelphia and the town of Gulu in their their northern Ugandan homeland.
NEWS
April 4, 2013
War-crimes hunt for Kony on hold NAIROBI, Kenya - The Ugandan military has suspended its hunt for war-crimes suspect Joseph Kony and his Lord's Resistance Army, delivering a major setback to capturing a warlord accused in the abductions of tens of thousands of children over the last three decades. Wednesday's announcement came days after rebels seized power in the Central African Republic, where Kony is said to be hiding, and then refused to cooperate with Ugandan troops stationed in the country.
NEWS
August 5, 2012 | By Matthew Lee, Associated Press
ENTEBBE, Uganda - U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said Friday that she hopes drones will soon be able to see through jungle cover so they can locate warlord Joseph Kony. Clinton made the remark in Uganda as she watched a small U.S.-made drone that the Ugandan military uses in Somalia to fight al-Qaeda-linked militants. The United States last year sent 100 special-forces advisers to Central Africa to help hunt Kony, the leader of the Lord's Resistance Army, a band of jungle-roaming militants known for kidnapping children, taking girls as sex slaves, and disfiguring victims.
NEWS
June 28, 2012 | By Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A House panel on Wednesday approved legislation that would expand the State Department's rewards for justice program to target the world's most serious human-rights abusers, with African warlord Joseph Kony a top target. In a rare moment of bipartisanship, Democratic and Republican members of the Foreign Affairs Committee adopted a bill that would authorize operations for the State Department and speed up the process for U.S. arms sales overseas. The voice vote approval reflected the desire of both parties to complete such a broad-based State Department bill for the first time in a decade.
NEWS
April 29, 2012 | By Rodney Muhumuza, Associated Press
RIVER VOVODO, Central African Republic - For Ugandan soldiers tasked with catching Joseph Kony, the real threat is not the elusive Central Africa warlord and his brutal gang. Encounters with the Lord's Resistance Army rebels are so rare that Kony hunters worry more about the threats of the jungle: armed poachers, wild beasts, honey bees, and even a fly that torments their ears. A soldier crossing the Chinko river in the Central African Republic this month was drowned and mauled by a crocodile, spreading terror among hundreds of soldiers who must camp near streams because they need water to cook food.
NEWS
April 25, 2012 | By Rodney Muhumuza, Associated Press
DJEMA, Central African Republic - An Internet campaign that has gone viral aims to capture the notorious rebel leader Joseph Kony, but Ugandan foot soldiers who have spent years searching for the man are starting to ask a question their top commanders prefer to ignore: Is it possible he is dead? Ugandan army officials say the Lord's Resistance Army leader is alive and hiding somewhere within the Central African Republic. Rank-and-file soldiers, however, say intelligence on Kony is so limited that if he dies, or is already dead, his foes might never know and could wind up chasing a ghost through this vast Central Africa jungle.
NEWS
March 24, 2012 | By Rodney Muhumuza, Associated Press
ENTEBBE, Uganda - The African Union said Friday it would send 5,000 soldiers to join the hunt for notorious rebel leader Joseph Kony, a new mission that comes amid a wildly popular Internet campaign targeting the leader of the Lord's Resistance Army. The mission is to be launched in South Sudan on Saturday and will last until Kony is caught, U.N. and African Union officials said at a news conference in Uganda. "We need to stop Kony with hardware - with military hardware in this case," said Francisco Madeira, the African Union's special envoy on the LRA. "We are on a mission to stop him. " An Internet movie campaign this month backed by the U.S. advocacy group Invisible Children sought to make Kony "famous" so policymakers would make removing him a priority.
NEWS
March 19, 2012 | Wires / Bloomberg
By David Kenner Here's a puzzle: A video calling for international action to capture Joseph Kony, a Ugandan guerrilla who commands a couple hundred men and has killed 151 civilians during the past year, has been viewed by about 80 million people on YouTube. Meanwhile, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad - who boasts 600,000 men under arms, along with almost 5,000 tanks, and who often kills more than 100 people a day, according to activists - generates exponentially less outrage. The imbalance is particularly striking on Twitter.
NEWS
March 14, 2012 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stop a brutal thug who has killed, raped, and terrorized children for decades. Why would anyone take issue with that goal? But a cyclone of controversy is swirling around Kony 2012 , a video by a San Diego-based nonprofit called Invisible Children. The video targets brutal Ugandan-born militia leader Joseph Kony and has gotten more than 76 million views on YouTube since it was posted March 5. Some say that Invisible Children's leaders are a bunch of self-promoting, overprivileged young adults, others that they are brilliant filmmaker/advocates who know how to use new-media tools to grab the attention of high school and college students.
NEWS
March 11, 2012 | By Rodney Muhumuza, Associated Press
KAMPALA, Uganda - The wildly successful viral video campaign to raise global awareness about a brutal central Africa rebel leader is drawing criticism from some Ugandans who said Friday that the 30-minute video misrepresented the complicated history of Africa's longest-running conflict. The campaign by the advocacy group Invisible Children to make militia leader Joseph Kony a household name received enormous attention on YouTube and other Internet sites during the week. But critics in Uganda said the video glossed over the complicated history that made it possible for Kony to achieve the notoriety he has today.
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