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Joseph Neubauer

NEWS
February 6, 1998 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Alan K. "Scotty" Campbell, 74, academician and former chairman of the U.S. Civil Service Commission who was appointed by President Jimmy Carter to reform the federal civil service system, died of complications from emphysema Wednesday at his home in Haverford. Mr. Campbell served only three years in government, but his short tenure resulted in the most sweeping changes in the federal workforce, Carter said in a 1978 interview. He left his post as dean of public affairs at the University of Texas in 1977 to overhaul the federal civil service system, and shepherded the Civil Service Act of 1978 through a reluctant Congress.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2001 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Aramark Corp., which provides food, child-care, and laundry services worldwide, filed for an initial public offering of new class B shares that could raise as much as $600 million. The Philadelphia company did not set a price range for shares in the IPO. It also did not specify how many shares would be offered, but said that the total would be less than 20 percent of its outstanding shares. Aramark, which hopes to list the shares on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker symbol RMK, valued the stock sale at $600 million for the purpose of calculating its fee to register with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2006 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Aramark Corp. said yesterday that its net income fell 18.8 percent in what may be the Philadelphia company's last quarter as a public company. Weaker results at baseball stadiums and national parks where Aramark provides food and other services helped cut earnings to $74.36 million, or 40 cents a share, in its fourth quarter ended Sept. 29 from $91.55 million, or 49 cents a share, in the same period a year earlier. Other factors in the decline included costs related to the shutdown of an apparel business, expensing employee stock options, and $5.7 million in expenses from the proposed sale of the company to an investment group led by chairman and chief executive officer Joseph Neubauer.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2006 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Investors in Philadelphia Media Holdings L.L.C. met for the first time yesterday and toured the Broad Street offices of The Inquirer, Philadelphia Daily News, and philly.com, which they plan to acquire after the scheduled June 27 sale of the newspapers' current owner, Knight Ridder Inc., to The McClatchy Co. The new owners, mostly Philadelphia-area businesspeople, have already put their expertise to work for the newspapers. For example, commercial-insurance broker William A. Graham has arranged insurance coverage for the newspapers for after the sale.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2001 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Aramark Corp., the Philadelphia-based purveyor of work clothes, day care and stadium food, rejoined the New York Stock Exchange yesterday after a 17-year absence. Aramark's high-rise Market Street headquarters, topped by its "star-man" logo, is a familiar fixture on the Center City skyline. But its corporate staff totals only 115, and most of the company's 200,000 employees labor elsewhere - in more than 600 Children's World day-care centers, 350 college cafeterias, 165 public-arena food concessions, 200 laundry plants and depots, and clothing factories in low-wage Puerto Rico and Mexico, among other sites.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1994 | By Andrea Knox, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's bigger than ballpark hot dogs, bigger than college cafeterias, bigger even than feeding 10,000 Olympic athletes: ARA Services wants to be the world's full-line service company. With a name change to Aramark, a new logo and an international advertising campaign - all to hit in October - the Philadelphia firm will sell itself around the world as a one-stop source for uniform rental, housekeeping services, child care, magazine and newspaper distribution, even emergency-room staffing for hospitals.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2004 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Aramark Corp. chief executive officer William Leonard abruptly resigned his posts yesterday and was replaced with the company's largest shareholder and former CEO, Joseph Neubauer. It was a stunning change of course for Aramark, the Philadelphia food-service and outsourcing giant with more than 200,000 employees, who run boilers in hospitals, cook hot dogs at professional sport stadiums, stock vending machines with salty snacks and sodas, and do many other things. The company, which had revenue of about $9.5 billion in 2003, endured a sharp drop in its stock price over the summer.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2012 | Inquirer Staff Report
IN THE REGION Insider trading charged The U.S. Attorney in Philadelphia charged Timothy McGee, of Philadelphia, with insider trading, saying that McGee learned of the pending acquisition of Bala Cynwyd insurer Philadelphia Consolidated Holding Corp. by Tokio Marine from a Philadelphia Consolidated executive McGee knew through Alcoholics Anonymous. The two-count indictment of McGee, 48, alleges that he made $292,000 from illegal trades. The indictment also alleges that McGee tipped a friend to the pending sale of Philadelphia Consolidated.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2006 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Aramark Corp., the largest U.S.-based food-service company, will be taken private after shareholders overwhelmingly approved a $6.3 billion buyout bid yesterday. It marked the second time that a group of investors led by chairman and chief executive officer Joseph Neubauer moved to take Aramark off the stock market. The first time, in 1984, was to thwart a "hostile takeover attempt that could have been the end of the company," Neubauer said at a meeting of shareholders at the Center City Marriott Hotel yesterday.
NEWS
April 22, 2010 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Early Wednesday, the former Holmes Lounge & Garden was a drab wood-frame and stucco building on North 27th Street in East Camden. Its mirrored bar and covered patio - where customers including Patti LaBelle, Allen Iverson, and Boyz II Men once enjoyed smooth jazz and hard crabs - were idle. That changed with the arrival of more than 100 volunteers from corporate and nonprofit groups who gave the former popular restaurant a makeover - and a new purpose. Whirring saws, hammers, and fresh paint quickly helped to transform the building into an early child-care and education center.
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