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Joseph Neubauer

NEWS
February 6, 1998 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Alan K. "Scotty" Campbell, 74, academician and former chairman of the U.S. Civil Service Commission who was appointed by President Jimmy Carter to reform the federal civil service system, died of complications from emphysema Wednesday at his home in Haverford. Mr. Campbell served only three years in government, but his short tenure resulted in the most sweeping changes in the federal workforce, Carter said in a 1978 interview. He left his post as dean of public affairs at the University of Texas in 1977 to overhaul the federal civil service system, and shepherded the Civil Service Act of 1978 through a reluctant Congress.
BUSINESS
December 13, 1994 | by Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
Aramark, the food-service provider formerly known as ARA Services Inc., said yesterday that it had acquired Harry M. Stevens Inc., which operates food and drink concessions at some of the nation's biggest arenas and ballparks. With the newly acquired contracts, Aramark, which has operated stadium concessions around the country since 1966, will now provide service at the homes of 28 teams in baseball, football, basketball and hockey. Aramark officials would not disclose the price of the deal, which gives the Center City-based company rights to venues in nine states and Puerto Rico.
BUSINESS
December 13, 1994 | By Andrea Knox, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia's Aramark will be dishing up hot dogs and soda to fans at Shea Stadium, the Meadowlands and Churchill Downs with its purchase of Harry M. Stevens, announced yesterday. Stevens, which Aramark says is the oldest concessions business in the United States, also counts the Miami Arena, Houston Astrodome and Long Island's Nassau Coliseum among the 20 accounts it will add to the 100 already in Aramark's leisure-services portfolio. Aramark, which is privately held, did not disclose how much it paid, nor how much Stevens would add to its $5 billion in annual revenues.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1994 | by Bill Wedo, Daily News Staff Writer
The Grand Canyon and Mount Rushmore will soon get a taste of Philadelphia. Aramark, the Center City-based operator of food and souvenir operations at a num ber of national and state parks nationwide, said yesterday that it will buy TW Recreational Services Inc. for $130 million. The deal will give Aramark new operations at more than 20 parks in 10 states, including Yellowstone National Park, the North Rim of the Grand Canyon, Bryce Canyon National Park, Zion Canyon National Park and Mount Rushmore National Memorial.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1994 | By Andrea Knox, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's bigger than ballpark hot dogs, bigger than college cafeterias, bigger even than feeding 10,000 Olympic athletes: ARA Services wants to be the world's full-line service company. With a name change to Aramark, a new logo and an international advertising campaign - all to hit in October - the Philadelphia firm will sell itself around the world as a one-stop source for uniform rental, housekeeping services, child care, magazine and newspaper distribution, even emergency-room staffing for hospitals.
BUSINESS
April 12, 1993 | By Andrea Knox, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Hey, I'm gonna go hang out with Gracie," exclaimed Joseph Neubauer as he broke away from an entourage of ARA Services Inc. executives to dart behind a food-service counter in an ARA-run cafeteria. Grace Bland, beef carver and rotisserie operator, giggled indulgently, scolded ARA's chief executive officer for getting in her way, and then posed with him for a photo. This particular byplay, on a tour of an ARA-managed corporate cafeteria, may have been just staged-for-the-media foolishness.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1992 | By Terry Bivens, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
ARA Services Inc., the Philadelphia service conglomerate, announced yesterday the cash purchase of WearGuard Corp., a Norwell, Mass., company that sells work uniforms and clothing. ARA did not disclose the terms of the deal. WearGuard employs about 1,000 people and has annual revenue of $120 million. The company sells its work clothing through catalogues to small and medium-size businesses. WearGuard also has a clothing division for big and tall men, King Size, and a men's shoe operation, E.T. Wright.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1986 | By James Asher, Inquirer Staff Writer
The board of directors of the Philadelphia Orchestra Association, once the bastion of the bluest of the region's blue bloods, is a different animal these days. Gone are many of the representatives of traditional orchestra families. In their places are men and women with the kind of corporate connections that once might have produced a shudder within Philadelphia's established upper crust. Just this year, developer Ronald I. Rubin; Harvey Lamm, chairman of Subaru of America Inc.; George Ross of Goldman Sachs & Co., and Edward A. Montgomery of Mellon Bank were voted on to the board.
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