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NEWS
April 9, 2012 | John Timpane, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The thrilling adventure of OR-7 has captivated the West Coast and Northwest. It's a saga of courage and the enduring resilience of the wild. It's also a saga that will never happen in Pennsylvania or New Jersey. OR-7 is the gray wolf who left his pack in northwest Oregon and trekked more than 1,000 miles into Stanislaus County, Calif. The first gray wolf in the state since 1924, he has become so famous they had a contest to name him. The winning name, chosen by two separate kids: Journey.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2002 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Somber, serious and absolutely gorgeous (Iranian desert vistas, Balkan tundra, nomads on camelback on the far side of Turkey), The Journey to Kafiristan is a moody road movie about two women in search of themselves as the world gets ready for war. Inspired by the memoirs of Annemarie Schwarzenbach, a Swiss socialite who ended up in a New York City mental ward, and her travels in 1939 with the amateur ethnologist Ella Maillart, the film is an...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1999 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
Many years ago, in a time before chat rooms, malls and Mortal Kombat, boys and girls would get their parents, whom they called "Mom and Dad," to drive them to "the show" on Saturday afternoons. "The show" was held in something called a "movie theater," which was a little bit like a multiplex, except that it had only one screen, and actually served real melted butter on its popcorn, which was offered in modest portions and not the milk pails, mop buckets and garbage cans of today.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2004 | By Karen Heller INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Daums are united by love and Orthodox Judaism, yet firmly asunder in faith in their fellow man. Sons Tzvi Dovid and Akiva, Torah scholars and residents of Israel, distrust non-Jews and deal with them infrequently. To them, a Christian isn't their fellow man. Their father, New Yorker Menachem Daum, who made Hiding and Seeking with filmmaker Oren Rudavsky, struggles with Orthodoxy's tendency to sever ties with the larger world, as well as with trust. "Better no religion than a religion that doesn't see godliness in every human being," Menachem says, quoting his late teacher, composer Shlomo Carlebach, whose music orchestrates this moving cinematic memoir.
NEWS
August 15, 1990 | By Barbara Evans Sorid, Special to The Inquirer
Kevin Hunt and Jeff Williams want to become brothers. The men seem to have little in common. Hunt, 25, who is from Ireland, is a construction worker. Williams, 31, from Maryland, is a former Navy man. But what both men share is a desire to dedicate their lives to God and to work with profoundly handicapped people. Together, they are on the brink of committing themselves to a Catholic religious order that is pledged to serve the mentally handicapped, the elderly and the physically disabled and to restore to them a personal dignity.
NEWS
October 15, 1986 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
Journey, the San Francisco rock band that came to the Spectrum last night, was one of the most popular rock acts of the late '70s and early '80s. Its hard-rock instrumentation, combined with the thin, piercingly emotional vocals of lead singer Steve Perry, brought the band enormous success. Journey is on tour for the first time in three years, promoting its new album Raised on Radio (Columbia), which has sold more than a million copies. At the Spectrum, the band - Perry, guitarist Neal Schon, keyboardist Jonathan Cain, bassist Randy Jackson and drummer Mike Baird - offered a wide- ranging selection of its successes, including "Any Way You Want It," "Don't Stop Believin' " and "Lovin', Touchin', Squeezin'," as well as a substantial number of songs from Raised on Radio, including the band's current hit single, "Girl Can't Help It. " What most distinguished this performance from previous Journey tours was its refreshing liveliness and good humor.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1986 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
My new favorite rock band in the world, Journey, has just released an album titled Raised on Radio (Columbia). With one exception, the music on the album isn't really all that good - it's Journey's usual combination of bombastic overstatement and florid melodrama. The exception is pretty neat though: The lyrics for "Raised on Radio" consist entirely of lines from classic rock songs, from Chuck Berry's "Maybellene" to Shelley Fabares' "Johnny Angel," stitched together as verses to this clever tune.
NEWS
June 29, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
BROOKLYN - Among the half-dozen Philadelphia composers currently working on operas, the ultra-expressionistic Michael Hersch is the first to see his produced. On the Threshold of Winter was premiered Wednesday in a small-scale production at the Brooklyn Academy of Music by soprano Ah Young Hong and the Nunc contemporary music group - and emerged as something so uncompromising that any future presentation in a traditional opera house is unlikely. Based on Marin Sorescu's 1996 poems written in the weeks before his death from liver cancer, On the Threshold of Winter is a journey into fatal illness that, in Hersch's hands, acknowledges no distance, safe or otherwise, between a listener and the suffering protagonist.
NEWS
June 16, 2007 | By David Hiltbrand, For The Inquirer
'What song is that, Dad?" I was sitting under a tent last week with family members after my son's high school graduation when he asked about the classic rock tune that was playing during his class video. I listened to the chugging intro and pegged the band as Journey but misidentified the title as "On and On. " After a few bars I corrected myself, "It's called 'Don't Stop Believin'. " So it was eerie when, two nights later, the same vintage power ballad provided the final notes for The Sopranos . Pretty cheesy choice for a series that always has been canny in its use of music.
NEWS
September 11, 1997 | By Terry Dalton
More than four decades later, I can still picture the four of us journeying by car from our home in northern New Jersey to Florida to visit relatives near Miami. The shock of seeing the often hand-scrawled signs along U.S. 301 as we entered the South for the first time: "No coloreds" in front of $9-a-night motels; "coloreds" and "whites only" signs looming above drinking fountains at run-down gas stations; "whites only, please" signs in the windows of restaurants. For two weeks this summer, I went on another journey, this time by telephone and e-mail, not by automobile.
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TRAVEL
July 20, 2015 | By Ellie Slott Fisher, For The Inquirer
Standing at an edge of the eastern Pacific Ocean on sand as white as the moon and as soft as cashmere, I spot scores of sea turtles treading water in mid-wave. They are waiting for the sun to set so they can safely come ashore and bury their eggs. But I won't see their amphibious landing, because like all humans, I must leave the island before dark. This is the Galapagos, and I am merely an interloper, a party crasher. Yet, those minutes I spend on the silky beach, my toes submerged in water the color of blue topaz, are some of the most memorable in my life.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER ARTS CRITIC
NEW YORK - When the hymn "Amazing Grace" gets to the line about saving "a wretch like me," it's not routine self-flagellation. The author of the song was a wretch indeed, a slave trader who sent some of his nearest and dearest off to be worked to death, as dramatized in the new Broadway musical Amazing Grace about John Newton, who wrote the song's lyrics as the capstone of his redemption. That title, unfortunately, isn't the only predictable aspect of this show, whose backstory also includes the Broadway debut of Christopher Smith of Bucks County, a former suburban police officer who, seized by Newton's story, spent a decade writing the music and lyrics, and coauthored the book.
TRAVEL
July 13, 2015 | By Janet Skidmore, For The Inquirer
As a little girl growing up in New Jersey, I loved hearing my father tell me stories about his Navy service aboard an aircraft carrier in the Pacific during World War II. The war was already raging when my then 17-year-old dad persuaded his reluctant father to allow him to enlist in the Navy in 1942. It was an unusual choice for a farm boy from the tiny town of De Kalb, Texas, who had never seen the sea. By the time he turned 18, Dad was serving with 3,000 shipmates on the USS Yorktown, the Navy's newest warship.
TRAVEL
July 6, 2015 | By Jeffrey S. Markovitz, For The Inquirer
The Inca Trail is a rite of passage. It is a religious experience, stretching from Peru's aptly named Sacred Valley, not too far from the city of Cusco, all the way to Machu Picchu. Really, it's only around 30 miles and can be traversed in a couple of days, but what it lacks in distance it makes up for in ecosystems, vistas, and ruins that are in no way ruinous. The trek begins at a small parking lot near a gatehouse that serves as the origin for most hikes to Machu Picchu; travelers must show their entrance tickets and have their passports stamped before beginning the hike.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Every immigrant's story begins with a journey. Some escape from harsh regimes; some leave for education or employment opportunities; others simply seek the promise of a new life in a new land. Silvana Cardell's Supper, People on the Move pays homage to these stories in a harrowing, captivating dance-theater piece. Filled with symbolism and metaphor, it forcefully conveys the emotional power of the psychological and physical perils that can plague an immigrant's passage. Supper , performed through last weekend at Crane Arts' Icebox space, opens on six performers seated at set of long folding tables, their hands and arms linked, then broken apart in waves, a series of slow gestures that embody the longing of farewell.
TRAVEL
June 29, 2015 | By Helen Armstrong, For The Inquirer
I spent my first semester of college in London making friends, traveling, and having all sorts of unexpected adventures, thanks to a program my university calls the First Year Study Abroad Experience. Lots of cool things happened, but my best story is the time my friend Sara and I got lost in Pompeii at night. We were the last ones allowed inside for the day, and we had only an hour to spend there. They had run out of maps by the time we arrived, so we were left to our own devices to explore.
SPORTS
June 29, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Luis Medina's eyes wandered curiously upward to the stained glass windows of St. Joseph Pro-Cathedral in Camden. He tapped his ring finger repeatedly against his thumb and swayed in the pew. Medina, 23, stood beside his much younger peers, whose eyes were focused on the priest welcoming them into the church on their confirmation day. With very limited language and the cognitive skills of a 4-year-old, Medina, who has autism, is locked in...
TRAVEL
June 22, 2015 | By Kathleen J. Corbalis, For The Inquirer
During a monthlong European vacation, my husband and I made a detour to the Italian Alps to visit the world-famous "Iceman," Ötzi. There, we found the mummified, centuries-old Copper Age wanderer and much more - a delightfully surprising day among the dead and living. Our destination was Bolzano, a small city tucked into a mountainous corner of Italy near the Austrian border, on the train route from Munich to Verona. Bolzano is home to a museum that showcases the 5,000-year-old Iceman, whose miraculously preserved body was discovered in 1991 by hikers in glacial ice nearby.
TRAVEL
June 15, 2015 | By Keith Costigan, For The Inquirer
The small plane banked steeply to give us a better view of the remains of a circular hilltop city rising from the wide plain barely a mile below. "Megiddo," the pilot said, pointing. "This is the Valley of Armageddon. " Israel lies at the meeting point of three continents, but it is also a temporal nexus of past and present, where the ages of settlement can be seen and even touched in the layers of its ancient towns. As a teacher of history, I came to Israel seeking its past but found the current events taking place amid its archaeological sites competed for my interest, and in a few places like Megiddo, steeped in Biblical portent, it was the future that cast the longest shadow.
TRAVEL
June 8, 2015 | By Shirley Phillips, For The Inquirer
When you travel to a foreign country, you see amazing sights and beautiful scenery. Sometimes, however, the most amazing and beautiful thing you experience is the people. Most of us in our lifetimes have done something incredibly stupid - something you look back on and think, "How could I possibly have done that?" My friend and I are seasoned travelers. On our trip to Spain, the 12th European country we've visited, we had no reason to believe everything would not be as wonderful as before.
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