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ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Born in Lisbon, Portugal, and now residing in Philadelphia, American journalist and author Richard C. Morais became an internationally renowned best-selling author almost overnight with the 2010 publication of his debut novel, The Hundred-Foot Journey , an emotionally resonant story about travel, food, and love. It's no surprise, then, that DreamWorks Pictures came a-knocking. The studio hired the perfect person to helm its adaptation, Lasse Hallström, a specialist in heartful, feel-good romantic dramas such as Safe Haven , Dear John , and Chocolat . Due on disc Tuesday, The Hundred-Foot Journey stars South Carolina native Manish Dayal ( 90210 , The Sorcerer's Apprentice )
TRAVEL
November 24, 2014 | By Ranjan Mukherjee, For The Inquirer
To most people, lions are symbolic of Africa. However, in one forest on another continent, the Asian lion has made its last stand. Once upon a time, lions roamed in large numbers across a vast swath of Europe and Asia. But hunting and habitat destruction have greatly reduced their numbers. Gir Forest National Park in the state of Gujarat, India, is the last stronghold of the Asian lion. There are only about 200 left in the wild. On a trip to India in January, I decided to visit Gir to see these elusive Asian lions and the deer, wild boars, monkeys, and peacocks that inhabit the forest.
NEWS
November 16, 2014 | By Catherine Feskanin, For The Inquirer
Perhaps it was the image of the blackened, frostbitten ear that somehow kept popping up before my dream trip to cross-country ski in Yellowstone National Park that made me pause. Or, maybe the week of "unusually low historic temperatures," down to minus-27 Fahrenheit, stopped me in my tracks. Camp fan that I am, I had signed up with Yellowstone Expeditions, a yurt outfitter that offered heat in sleeping "yurtlets" and even in the outhouses; the brochure promised "élan. " Though I reassured my resort-loving sister Carol that I'd stay in "conventional hotels" on other nights, even my intrepid spirit wondered if a nightmare could hijack the dream.
NEWS
November 9, 2014 | By Samantha Farkas, For The Inquirer
There is an inscription outside the visitors' center of Yad Vashem, the World Center for Holocaust Research, located in Jerusalem. It reads: "Has the like of this happened in your days or in the days of your fathers? Tell your children about it, and let your children tell theirs, and their children the next generation! (1 Joel, 2-3). " It's for this reason that I traveled to Israel with my grandfather, Jakab Farkas, a survivor of Auschwitz-Birkenau. He had never spoken of his experience in the Nazi death camp, and my parents had forbidden me to ask. "It will upset him," they said, and so I went to Israel under the guise of meeting distant relatives.
NEWS
November 6, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
PITTSBURGH - Gov. Corbett wept Tuesday night, but it wasn't over the election results. Midway through his concession speech, before about 200 supporters and banks of cameras, Corbett said he was most proud of the success he had during his term increasing services for people with intellectual disabilities. A little girl appeared on the stage at the Omni William Penn Hotel, tiptoed behind him, and reached for the hand of his wife, Susan. Her mother, standing just a few feet in front of the governor, burst into sobs.
NEWS
November 2, 2014 | By Alix Gerz, For The Inquirer
"Wait. You're in Puerto Rico and NOT at the beach?" a friend messaged me when I posted a photo of the historic El Morro fortress on my Instagram feed. It was a question I'd gotten used to answering ever since I'd booked a trip with my husband to the island a few months earlier. Yes, I decided to go to Puerto Rico in the dead of summer, and, yes, I decided to stay in a landlocked hotel in Old San Juan. And, yes, it was one of the best (albeit warmest) travel decisions I've ever made.
TRAVEL
October 27, 2014 | By Steve Gallagher, For The Inquirer
In March, I flew to Georgia to embark on an epic adventure to hike the Appalachian Trail. It was an amazing experience on which I met interesting and inspirational people and gazed upon breathtaking vistas very few people will ever see. It was not all sunny days and effortless descents, however. After about two months and 500 miles, I decided to end my journey. It was a combination of nagging injuries and a realization that trail life wasn't for me, at least not four more months of it. Reading the "Personal Journey: Learning if a bear sniffs in the woods" article posted to philly.com on Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
With Vivaldi's music claimed by baroque-performance specialists in recent years, does that mean we have to wait for one of them if we're going to hear his many concertos outside of recordings? Though she's clearly a generalist, cellist Hai-Ye Ni stepped up as guest soloist and leader of Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia in a five-concerto baroque-to-classical program with nothing not to like anywhere. It was a chronological journey that cut a path from Vivaldi to Haydn's Cello Concerto in C major - a great idea, since listeners so easily take genial Haydn for granted, and this concert showed from whence he came.
TRAVEL
October 20, 2014 | By Jessica Miller, For The Inquirer
I lifted my backpack to my knees, shuffling everything inside it until I found my headphones and sketch pad. I needed these objects to distract me from hearing the man in front of me, belting out the Portuguese song playing on his iPod. Along with the other bewildered passengers at my sides, I couldn't resist releasing a giggle and smiling in the direction of my feet. I could catch a glimpse of the singing man through his reflection in the window. He appeared to be energized, and he sang with his eyes tightly shut.
TRAVEL
October 13, 2014 | By Julie Pratt and Steve Liskov, For The Inquirer
The summer of 2014 is certainly one for the record books. My boyfriend and I got the crazy idea to take a cross-country trip together. We shrugged off the astonished faces of all our friends as we prepared ourselves. We had money saved, a chunk of time, and a generalized game plan. We packed our car full of suitcases, food, and blankets; we were ready to hit the road. My boyfriend and I left from our homestead in the northeast corner of Pennsylvania. Slowly, we made our way down the East Coast.
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