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Joy Division

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2007 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Most music-world biopics aim to mythologize their subject - the tormented artist with humble roots who rises to greatness, captures the hearts and wallets of millions, and then dies in some terrible plane-crash/ drug-overdose/freak-accident-with-a-garden-gnome way. Control , Anton Corbijn's terrific film about Ian Curtis, lead singer of the '70s U.K. band Joy Division, will have none of that. Shot in wide-screen black and white (the Dutch-born Corbijn is a photographer making his directing debut)
NEWS
March 7, 1996 | by Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
When the Velvet Underground was inducted into the Rock 'n' Roll Hall of Fame in January, music fans couldn't help but think back to the joke Brian Eno once cracked that spoke heaps about the impact of the '60s band. Eno, the Roxy Music keyboardist turned solo artist and producer, years ago quipped that only a few thousand people actually bought the Velvet Underground's debut album, "The Velvet Underground and Nico" - and every last one of 'em formed their own band. The truth is that the Velvet Underground had an almost immeasurable influence on generations that followed.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2013
Miranda Lambert The quality of Miranda Lambert's songwriting hasn't quite kept up with the former Nashville Star contestant's rise in the country music power rankings. But while the best albums by Blake Shelton's better half are still the all-fired-up Kerosene (2005) and Crazy Ex-Girlfriend (2007), the tough-talking twangy Texan still outclasses the vast majority of her Music City competition. And her Pistol Annies side project, with Ashley Monroe and Angaleena Presley, has produced one pretty great CD (2011's Hell on Heels )
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2001 | By SARA SHERR For the Daily News
THE EIGHTH ANNUAL Philadelphia Music Conference kicks off this week, and it's still frustratingly sprawling for any average music fan. But here are a few highlights: Somewhere between The Jesus Lizard and Joy Division is Stendhal (9 tonight, The Balcony, 10th and Arch streets, 215-922-LIVE, $7). For power-pop fans, there's The Churchills (9:30 tonight, Grape Street Pub, 107 Grape St., 215-483-7084) and The Acme Rock Group (10:45 p.m. Saturday, Fergie's, 1214 Sansom St., 215-928-8118)
NEWS
April 3, 2006 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Justin Warfield sat on the fringe of the music business for 15 years - a hippie-hop rapper doing a not-so-bad imitation of De La Soul, a post-psychedelic rocker doing a not-so-good imitation of someone with talent, a DJ. Yet, it's through She Wants Revenge - his teaming with DJ Adam Bravin - that Warfield found a new wave-ish niche to pack TLA on Friday night. In name, sound and lyrics, the onstage quartet is but a tribute to the decadent doom of Joy Division: its ominous, bass-plucked repetition; its haunted, hollow-voiced singer, the late Ian Curtis; and Curtis' wallowing obtuse lyrics.
NEWS
July 31, 2006 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
How do you know a band or record is of the moment - trendy, even necessary - apart from it selling millions of CDs and downloads? If it seems as though every bar and store plays and displays it. You can still see The Buena Vista Social Club and Beck's Odelay years after their prominent position at Urban Outfitters' register - a trick of retinal retention, surely. This summer it's the black-and-gray cover (and the matching dour sound) of Back Room from the British quartet Editors that's so ubiquitous - and that undoubtedly translated into a sold-out TLA Saturday night.
NEWS
July 24, 1991 | By Sam Wood, Special to The Inquirer
It doesn't take a visionary to recognize that successful rock and roll often has its roots planted in the dance floor. Sisters of Mercy has capitalized on the dance beat for more than a decade. In the early '80s, the English band created guitar-based dance music for fans who wouldn't be caught dead in a disco. Products of the post-punk revolution, the Sisters have dabbled in a number of sounds - from the stripped-down gloom of Joy Division to the metal-gloss of Billy Idol.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1996 | By Sara Sherr, FOR THE INQUIRER
Girls Against Boys has the makings of a great band. The Chicago punk-noir quartet's blistering set at the Trocadero on Wednesday demonstrated more presence than many other recent major-label signings. (The band's next effort will have a home at DGC). The boys of Girls Against Boys (or its hip abbreviation GVSB) are the masters of mood, savoring each moment with a tension that's just as monumental as its inevitable release. Starting the show with "Tucked In," from 1994's Cruise Yourself, guitarist Scott McCloud wrapped his woozy, weary vocals around otherwise ordinary lyrics such as "Is everybody tucked in," making them seem like an invitation to stay out all night.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2007 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Most music-world biopics aim to mythologize their subject - the tormented artist with humble roots who rises to greatness, captures the hearts and wallets of millions, and then dies in some terrible plane-crash/drug-overdose/freak-accident-with-a-garden-gnome way. Control, Anton Corbijn's terrific film about Ian Curtis, lead singer of the '70s U.K. band Joy Division, will have none of that. Shot in wide-screen black and white (the Dutch-born Corbijn is a photographer making his directing debut)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2002 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
It might help to know New Order, to have heard "Love Will Tear Us Apart," and, yes, to be familiar with the legend of Icarus - the wax-winged dude who flew to close too the sun, etc., etc. But I'm betting that even folks who entirely missed the Manchester (England) music scene of the late '70s and '80s, the birth of Factory Records and Joy Division and the band of drugged-up loons known as the Happy Mondays, will get more than a little satisfaction out of 24 Hour Party People - director Michael Winterbottom's ingenious salute to one of those pop-cult Moments when music, fashion, philosophy and questionable hairstyles all coalesce in one dizzying, euphoric whoosh.
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NEWS
May 22, 2015 | BY SAM WOOD, Philly.com samwood@phillynews.com, 215-854-2796
THE CITY has filed a lawsuit threatening to shut down Joy Tsin Lau, the Chinatown mainstay where nearly 100 lawyers and law students were sickened in February in one of Philadelphia's largest reported outbreaks of food-borne illness. The victims, many of them personal-injury lawyers, were laid low for several days with severe vomiting and diarrhea after a Lunar New Year banquet. The eight-course dinner was a fundraiser for a group of Temple University law students, the Asian Pacific American Law Student Association.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
YOU COULD compare Sweden's "We Are the Best!" to "School of Rock," except it's about a teen punk band, and there's no school of punk. No punk would build one, and no self-respecting punk would attend. On the other hand, punks might homeschool themselves, a fair description of what happens in this charming coming-of-age period piece (set in 1982), from Swedish director Lukas Moodysson (who has a bit part here as the doofus manager of a rehearsal space, or maybe it's a supply closet)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2013
Miranda Lambert The quality of Miranda Lambert's songwriting hasn't quite kept up with the former Nashville Star contestant's rise in the country music power rankings. But while the best albums by Blake Shelton's better half are still the all-fired-up Kerosene (2005) and Crazy Ex-Girlfriend (2007), the tough-talking twangy Texan still outclasses the vast majority of her Music City competition. And her Pistol Annies side project, with Ashley Monroe and Angaleena Presley, has produced one pretty great CD (2011's Hell on Heels )
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Few bands contain the moody mix of New Wave glitz and heartland earnestness that the Killers do. Truth be told, no other band has the weird, showy blend that Brandon Flowers and Co. have. The Killers' brash feel for Springsteen huskiness and luxurious Duran Duran grace - with a little schmaltz in honor of their hometown, Las Vegas, thrown in for good measure - is theirs and theirs alone. If you truly craved that mash-up of the tartly phony (nothing wrong with plastic) and the ardently windswept, the grandly European and the heartily American, you made your way to the Killers sold-out show at Camden's Susquehanna Center on a misty Sunday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2011
Need to get out of your musical rut? Josh Landow picks 10 bands - all on regular rotation on Y-Not - that you need to hear now. THOSE DARLINS: As soon as I heard the lyric "You just wanna stick it in" from "Be Your Bro," I was hooked. They've ditched their country roots for a catchy indie-rock-based second album, "Screws Get Loose. " DARWIN DEEZ: Using the metaphor of a radar detector for a love interest in a catchy pop song - as they do on their single "Radar Detector" - is brilliant.
NEWS
May 18, 2011 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Here is a selection of postings from our Metro columnists' blog, Blinq ( www.philly.som/blinq ). Presuming Saturday kicks off the End of Times, we're going to need some tunes. The earth will cleave, the righteous dead will rise (along with 200 million Christians who have lived right), and the rest of us will talk among ourselves as we're picked off like superheated teens in a one-star movie. You might want to fire up a little musical accompaniment: "Scythian Empires," by Andrew Bird, starts the soundtrack, a soothing narrator announcing, "Five-day forecast brings black tall rains and hellfire.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2010 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
MUSIC AND FILM buffs may wait a couple weeks for the sensitively wrought John Lennon biopic "Nowhere Boy" to mark its official opening. Or, more intriguing, you could enjoy a special sneak peek of the film on Tuesday at the Keswick, enhanced with a chat and performances by special guests who knew and worked with Lennon back in the day. Scripted by the same bloke (Matt Greenhalgh) who visualized Joy Division's bleak world in the cult hit "Control," "Nowhere Boy" finally brings to the screen the fascinating saga of John Lennon's formative early years.
NEWS
February 22, 2010 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Of all the '80s-inspired acts to come from the class of 2003-05, Birmingham, England's Editors had it the hardest. They weren't as flashy as their contemporaries such as Franz Ferdinand. They weren't as political as Bloc Party or as poppy as Kaiser Chiefs. Editors didn't even have quite the same danceable robo-disco thrust as the others. What Editors did have was an impressive dedication to Joy Division's bleak, atmospheric brand of post-punk with a vocalist and lyricist (baritone Tom Smith)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2009 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
There are artists whom journalists interview once and they're done with each other. Little more can be said by either party regarding said aesthetic enterprise. Then there are guys such as the electronic music-maker Moby, who always have something new to say about something genuinely new that they've done. Like shifting gears from hard-core punk-rock to techno DJ to soft, sampling house-music maven. Or going from quietly making somnolent film scores to the brazen enterprise of 1999's Play, all of whose tunes got plucked for commercial usage.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2008 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Drawing inspiration from the young-artists-in-angst tales of Godard, Truffaut and the French new wave, Joachim Trier's Reprise is both a charming homage and a vibrant work in its own right. Although only a few whimsical flashbacks appear in black and white, this Norwegian film is so full of the spirit of its Gallic forbears that it feels black and white, even as you're gazing at the blue eyes of actress Viktoria Winge, or the red blood splattered on the sleeve of one of Reprise's two writer protagonists.
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