CollectionsJuan Valdez
IN THE NEWS

Juan Valdez

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 31, 2012
Juan Valdez, 74, a land-grant activist who fired the first shot during a 1967 New Mexico courthouse raid that marked a more radical turn in the Chicano Movement, died Saturday at his ranch in Canjilon, N.M., after recently suffering two heart attacks, his daughter Juanita Montoya said. Heir to a northern New Mexico land grant, Mr. Valdez was 29 when he and a group of land-grant advocates, led by Reies Lopez Tijerina, raided a Rio Arriba County courthouse in Tierra Amarilla. Their goal was to attempt a citizens' arrest of then-District Attorney Alfonso Sanchez over Hispanic land-rights issues.
NEWS
October 31, 1992 | Daily News wire services
CHICAGO HISPANIC HEALTH PROGRAM SOUGHT U.S. Surgeon General Antonia Novello said the country's diverse Latino groups need to improve their own status by uniting behind a new National Hispanic Health Initiative. Hispanics, who number more than 22 million in the United States, are more likely to be uninsured than either whites, blacks or Asians, Novello told approximately 200 Chicago-area Hispanic leaders. "We have been branded by the pervasive stereotypes that portray all Hispanics as poor, ignorant, lazy, undocumented immigrants who speak with an incomprehensible accent," said Novello, who is Puerto Rican.
NEWS
May 25, 2003 | By Frida Ghitis
As we in the West decide between lattes and frappuccinos, we'd do well to ponder another more serious crisis getting little attention among coffee consumers. Coffee prices have reached their lowest levels in 30 years. Millions whose lives depend on the crop are facing hunger, unemployment and worse because of a freefall during which the value of coffee has fallen 80 percent. As more and more people pay upward of $3 for a cup of coffee, millions of coffee farmers now face grinding poverty.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2010 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
You could see the double takes one morning two weeks ago, commuters jamming on the brakes as they hoofed through Suburban Station, pulling up short: Was that Passero's Coffee? Again? The counter had first opened in January 1991, back when the city's coffeescape was a lot sparser. Starbucks hadn't come to town yet (or even to California). La Colombe, which would become the city's premier roaster, wouldn't surface for four years. It's not stretching it to note that, for a fair number of customers, Passero's was their first encounter with a novel brew called "specialty coffee," extracted from the cream of the coffee crop (Arabica beans)
NEWS
August 31, 2005 | By David Hinckley NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
Say you're sitting in front of ESPN sipping a beer. Say someone asks if you think the Budweiser Clydesdales should be on the Madison Avenue Advertising Walk of Fame. You will say "yes" faster than you can dip a Dorito into the horseradish. As advertising icons go, the Clydesdales are brilliant. It seems like just yesterday Budweiser broke out the immortal ad where the Clydesdales form two sides for a football game and one team kicks the extra point and a guy on the sideline says that's surprising, because "they usually go for two. " The Walk of Fame question gets trickier, though, once you know 26 icons have been nominated for this year's Walk, and only two will make it. Unlike, say, the Baseball Hall of Fame, which has no more than a half-dozen serious candidates per year, the advertising icons field a deep lineup - characters who have successfully separated us from billions and billions of our dollars for products of widely varying necessity.
FOOD
July 10, 2008 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
Commuters who ventured westerly beyond the old, 17th Street boundary of Suburban Station last week found themselves encountering, after a set of frosted doors, a secret garden of underground eating. The terra was still a bit incognito. It wasn't immediately clear exactly where to line up for the gravied hot roast pork sandwiches being dispensed at the DiBruno Bros. stand. Or whether the milk-chocolate-dipped cherries at Sook Hee's Produce were for sale or being offered gratis as samples.
LIVING
May 4, 1999 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You don't have to be Juan Valdez to figure out that the specialty-coffee business is as sweet as a double-foam cappuccino dusted with cinnamon sugar. Starbucks dot the urban landscape like coffee beans ripening in the sun, and gas-station convenience stores hawk ready-made lattes right next to the Maxwell House. But to get a real idea of just how hot things have gotten for the folks who serve up $5.4 billion a year in espresso, latte, cappuccino and the rest, you had to be at the Convention Center last weekend.
NEWS
October 12, 1997 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Sure, they've heard of Eva Peron and Juan Valdez - the populist Argentine icon and the fictional coffee-bean grower. But most residents of the United States remain ignorant of other things South American. They are linked by land to their southern neighbors, but not by emotion. President Clinton travels to South America today to show the people there that they are, indeed, important to the United States. But he also will be making a point to the people back home - that it's time they extend their vision thousands of miles to the south.
NEWS
October 16, 1995 | By Stacia Friedman
A few years ago I took a trip to Seattle just to see what all the fuss was about. It was being hyped as "the most livable city in America" and, having resided in some of the more unlivable urban environments, I was curious. Sure enough, Seattle has a lot going for it. It has snow-capped mountains, unpolluted lakes and free bus service in the downtown area. But the most striking feature was the kiosks to be found on every street corner selling, of all things, coffee. At first, I thought, "How charming.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1993 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Coffee grower Juan Valdez and drug cartels - that's about all that many Americans know about Colombia. So it's no wonder that Colombian ambassador Gabriel Silva proudly welcomed his countryman, conductor Luis Biava - and Biava's well-prepared Youth Chamber Orchestra from Temple University's Music Preparatory Division - in a performance at the ambassador's residence Thursday night. "The stereotypes of Latin Americans are so strong. People believe we are primitive and that our level of living is so low," Silva told one of a dozen Philadelphia guests.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 31, 2012
Juan Valdez, 74, a land-grant activist who fired the first shot during a 1967 New Mexico courthouse raid that marked a more radical turn in the Chicano Movement, died Saturday at his ranch in Canjilon, N.M., after recently suffering two heart attacks, his daughter Juanita Montoya said. Heir to a northern New Mexico land grant, Mr. Valdez was 29 when he and a group of land-grant advocates, led by Reies Lopez Tijerina, raided a Rio Arriba County courthouse in Tierra Amarilla. Their goal was to attempt a citizens' arrest of then-District Attorney Alfonso Sanchez over Hispanic land-rights issues.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2010 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
You could see the double takes one morning two weeks ago, commuters jamming on the brakes as they hoofed through Suburban Station, pulling up short: Was that Passero's Coffee? Again? The counter had first opened in January 1991, back when the city's coffeescape was a lot sparser. Starbucks hadn't come to town yet (or even to California). La Colombe, which would become the city's premier roaster, wouldn't surface for four years. It's not stretching it to note that, for a fair number of customers, Passero's was their first encounter with a novel brew called "specialty coffee," extracted from the cream of the coffee crop (Arabica beans)
FOOD
July 10, 2008 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
Commuters who ventured westerly beyond the old, 17th Street boundary of Suburban Station last week found themselves encountering, after a set of frosted doors, a secret garden of underground eating. The terra was still a bit incognito. It wasn't immediately clear exactly where to line up for the gravied hot roast pork sandwiches being dispensed at the DiBruno Bros. stand. Or whether the milk-chocolate-dipped cherries at Sook Hee's Produce were for sale or being offered gratis as samples.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2007 | By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagen, staff
Q: I'm hoping you can help with a project I'm doing. I would like to know what kind of recipes use coffee as an ingredient. Do you have any suggestions? I would be interested in both sweet and savory preparations. Thanks. A: Stanley, I don't want to sound like a "drip," but I'm hoping to get some "perks" for helping with your project. As you may have guessed, coffee has much more success in recipes than I do with humor. Stanley, I don't want to sound like a "drip," but I'm hoping to get some "perks" for helping with your project.
NEWS
August 31, 2005 | By David Hinckley NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
Say you're sitting in front of ESPN sipping a beer. Say someone asks if you think the Budweiser Clydesdales should be on the Madison Avenue Advertising Walk of Fame. You will say "yes" faster than you can dip a Dorito into the horseradish. As advertising icons go, the Clydesdales are brilliant. It seems like just yesterday Budweiser broke out the immortal ad where the Clydesdales form two sides for a football game and one team kicks the extra point and a guy on the sideline says that's surprising, because "they usually go for two. " The Walk of Fame question gets trickier, though, once you know 26 icons have been nominated for this year's Walk, and only two will make it. Unlike, say, the Baseball Hall of Fame, which has no more than a half-dozen serious candidates per year, the advertising icons field a deep lineup - characters who have successfully separated us from billions and billions of our dollars for products of widely varying necessity.
NEWS
May 25, 2003 | By Frida Ghitis
As we in the West decide between lattes and frappuccinos, we'd do well to ponder another more serious crisis getting little attention among coffee consumers. Coffee prices have reached their lowest levels in 30 years. Millions whose lives depend on the crop are facing hunger, unemployment and worse because of a freefall during which the value of coffee has fallen 80 percent. As more and more people pay upward of $3 for a cup of coffee, millions of coffee farmers now face grinding poverty.
LIVING
May 4, 1999 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You don't have to be Juan Valdez to figure out that the specialty-coffee business is as sweet as a double-foam cappuccino dusted with cinnamon sugar. Starbucks dot the urban landscape like coffee beans ripening in the sun, and gas-station convenience stores hawk ready-made lattes right next to the Maxwell House. But to get a real idea of just how hot things have gotten for the folks who serve up $5.4 billion a year in espresso, latte, cappuccino and the rest, you had to be at the Convention Center last weekend.
NEWS
October 12, 1997 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Sure, they've heard of Eva Peron and Juan Valdez - the populist Argentine icon and the fictional coffee-bean grower. But most residents of the United States remain ignorant of other things South American. They are linked by land to their southern neighbors, but not by emotion. President Clinton travels to South America today to show the people there that they are, indeed, important to the United States. But he also will be making a point to the people back home - that it's time they extend their vision thousands of miles to the south.
NEWS
July 7, 1996 | By Alfred Lubrano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
I'm staring at the combed and cologned man with the big mouth. Rumpled and fractionally awake, I am wearing the morning Aspertame smile I affix at every bed-and-breakfast I visit - so fake, so sweet. I am praying to Juan Valdez, the guy on the Quaker Oats box, and all the other gods of the breakfast table to shut him up. But I know he will not stop. He is telling me about The Sound, a mysterious, high-pitched noise that some - not all - of the people of Taos hear. Of unknown origin, The Sound interrupts sleep and makes life generally vexatious for dog-eared folk in this artsy, New Age burg in the mountains.
NEWS
October 16, 1995 | By Stacia Friedman
A few years ago I took a trip to Seattle just to see what all the fuss was about. It was being hyped as "the most livable city in America" and, having resided in some of the more unlivable urban environments, I was curious. Sure enough, Seattle has a lot going for it. It has snow-capped mountains, unpolluted lakes and free bus service in the downtown area. But the most striking feature was the kiosks to be found on every street corner selling, of all things, coffee. At first, I thought, "How charming.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|