CollectionsJudith Schaechter
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Judith Schaechter

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NEWS
April 1, 2012 | Edith Newhall, FOR THE INQUIRER
The project that Philadelphia stained-glass artist Judith Schaechter proposed to Eastern State Penitentiary in June 2010: To fill the skylights of its moldering prison cells with a series of stained-glass windows. Period. It offered none of the usual pedantry that Sean Kelley, Eastern State's director of programming, and his committee had come to expect in artists' proposals since launching the penitentiary's exhibition program in 1995. "We had discussed her work in the past, saying that it would be ideal for the space, but it was still a hard decision to accept her proposal," Kelley says.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1991 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Judith Schaechter's mordant, sometimes macabre representations in stained glass of the bad, the ugly and the distressing aspects of modern life are by now familiar. Thematically, her show of new work at Snyderman Gallery offers more of the same - terminal illness, poverty, unrequited love and consumer excess. Only a compulsive moralist could keep turning out work like this, but then in this society a moralist doesn't lack for subject matter. Yet I detect a little softening of attitude in this latest batch of work; at least it doesn't include anything really gruesome or disgusting.
NEWS
September 1, 2000 | by Anne R. Fabbri, For the Daily News
Most of us consider broken glass a hazard, but Judith Schaechter revels in the shards of transparent color. The Philadelphia artist manipulates the inherently resistant material with relative ease and, occasionally, a few bloody fingers. The results of her painstaking and sometimes painful work are on display at the Snyderman Gallery through September. "I took an elective in glass at college and it changed my life" she said. "Now it is my passion, my vocation and my career. " She works in stained glass, a traditional material usually associated with church windows and serious subjects, and creates images that could only be statements about life here and now. Schaechter's work is both absolutely contemporary and rooted in art history.
NEWS
April 16, 1991 | by Betsey Hansell, Special to the Daily News
Political art that works is a marriage of opposites: It should give you the aesthetic satisfaction of a delicious meal and acute indigestion from swallowing sickening truths. The work should delight you, shock you and move you to action or at least to rethink a position. The eight Philadelphia artists in Part One of "Beyond Aesthetics: Artworks of Conscience" at the Alternative Museum in New York, succeed at the gourmet cooking part. Their work in a variety of media is professional, appealing and often delicious.
NEWS
June 6, 1997 | by Rick Selvin Daily News Staff Writer
What'cha doin' on this First FRIDAY of June? The city's artists and the galleries representing them hope your answer has the phrase "buying art" in it. If it does, check this listing of some of the exhibits debuting in Old City (from Walnut to Race streets between Front and 2nd) during the monthly celebration of creativity, as well as others this weekend around the city. Snyderman Gallery, 303 Cherry St., offers "Archaic Shapes/Natural Forms," an exhibition of mold-blown glass sculpture by Philadelphia artist Jon Clark, who for more than 20 years has directed the glass program at Temple University's Tyler School of Art; and "New Work," stained-glass panels by another Philadelphian, Judith Schaechter, a visiting lecturer at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and the University of the Arts.
NEWS
March 8, 1989 | By Patricia Stewart, Special to The Inquirer
The Port of History Museum is surely the city's most undefined cultural site, isolated between the river and I-95. Cab drivers don't know how to get there. The auditorium features some of the best but worst-attended concerts in Philadelphia. What seem to be several square miles of gallery space are filled with exhibitions that don't go together and wouldn't fit anywhere else. The museum's principal current occupant is "Art Around the Edges," a show selected from artists' groups and galleries in the city - MEAT, Momenta, Muse, Nexus, Philadelphia Artists Cooperative, Studio Diabolique, Taller Puertorriqueno and Third Street Gallery.
NEWS
March 14, 1993 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The pluralism, or anarchy, of styles and methods that reigns over present- day art has encouraged a resurgence of dedicated, old-fashioned craftsmanship. In certain instances, the more individualistic the artist, the more interesting the results of his dedicated handcraft. This, I believe, is what the guest curator, silversmith Sharon Church, had in mind in selecting the name "Gothic Affinities: Five Contemporary Artists in the Craft Tradition" for an exhibit she organized at Bucks County Community College, where it is now on view.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2006 | By G.W. MILLER III For the Daily News
OUTSIDE THORA Jacobson's office window, construction is all around. New homes are being built due north, on Bainbridge Street, and a condo tower is rising on Broad. Cranes hover in the distance, closer to the ever-growing city skyline. "They always say we are on the verge, the next great city," Jacobson scoffed. Rather than wait for the accolades and adulation to come to the city, Jacobson, the chief operating officer of Philagrafika, the region's foremost promoter of printmakers, is bringing the international stage here.
NEWS
January 23, 1994 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Tim Wilson of Philadelphia professes to be "a very big" Charles Burns fan. That's why he was among those at the opening reception for "Pop Eyes," a fine-art cartoon exhibit at the Abington Art Center in Jenkintown on the afternoon of Jan. 15. Following the reception, Burns, a Philadelphia cartoonist and illustrator, spoke at a lecture attended by about 100 people. Rounding out the day's festivities was an evening "Eye Poppin' Party" attended by some of the 11 artists featured in the cartoon show.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1995 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
To mark its 80th anniversary, the Philadelphia Art Alliance has put together an exhibition that calls attention to the many eminent artists who have shown their work there since the institution was founded in 1915. Guest curator Patricia Stewart has compiled an impressive roster of artists, most of them associated with Philadelphia. The show and its small catalog break down the checklist by discipline, beginning with architecture and proceeding through book illustration and the various craft media to painting, sculpture, photography and prints.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 1, 2012 | Edith Newhall, FOR THE INQUIRER
The project that Philadelphia stained-glass artist Judith Schaechter proposed to Eastern State Penitentiary in June 2010: To fill the skylights of its moldering prison cells with a series of stained-glass windows. Period. It offered none of the usual pedantry that Sean Kelley, Eastern State's director of programming, and his committee had come to expect in artists' proposals since launching the penitentiary's exhibition program in 1995. "We had discussed her work in the past, saying that it would be ideal for the space, but it was still a hard decision to accept her proposal," Kelley says.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2006 | By G.W. MILLER III For the Daily News
OUTSIDE THORA Jacobson's office window, construction is all around. New homes are being built due north, on Bainbridge Street, and a condo tower is rising on Broad. Cranes hover in the distance, closer to the ever-growing city skyline. "They always say we are on the verge, the next great city," Jacobson scoffed. Rather than wait for the accolades and adulation to come to the city, Jacobson, the chief operating officer of Philagrafika, the region's foremost promoter of printmakers, is bringing the international stage here.
NEWS
September 1, 2000 | by Anne R. Fabbri, For the Daily News
Most of us consider broken glass a hazard, but Judith Schaechter revels in the shards of transparent color. The Philadelphia artist manipulates the inherently resistant material with relative ease and, occasionally, a few bloody fingers. The results of her painstaking and sometimes painful work are on display at the Snyderman Gallery through September. "I took an elective in glass at college and it changed my life" she said. "Now it is my passion, my vocation and my career. " She works in stained glass, a traditional material usually associated with church windows and serious subjects, and creates images that could only be statements about life here and now. Schaechter's work is both absolutely contemporary and rooted in art history.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1999 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The Paley Design Center at Philadelphia University (formerly Philadelphia College of Textiles & Science) has come up with an unusual summer show, of stained glass and designs for compositions in that material by 11 artists. Curated by artist Joseph K. Beyer and gallery director Anne R. Fabbri, the show is designed to reveal the tradition of stained-glass artisanship in the city. Though many of the examples date from earlier in the century, there are enough contemporary pieces to confirm the continued vitality of the medium.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1997 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Jon Clark's glass sculpture has taken a turn toward antiquity, yet it retains its strong connection to contemporary taste. In large part, that's because the sources for his new work are relatively obscure and sufficiently enigmatic to support a variety of interpretations. The dozen sculptures on view at Snyderman Gallery refer to stone artifacts found in burial mounds of ancient North American cultures - for example, the Hopewell Culture, which flourished in southern Ohio from about 500 B.C. to A.D. 500. Clark's mold-blown sculptures could easily represent pure invention because they're so eccentric.
NEWS
June 6, 1997 | by Rick Selvin Daily News Staff Writer
What'cha doin' on this First FRIDAY of June? The city's artists and the galleries representing them hope your answer has the phrase "buying art" in it. If it does, check this listing of some of the exhibits debuting in Old City (from Walnut to Race streets between Front and 2nd) during the monthly celebration of creativity, as well as others this weekend around the city. Snyderman Gallery, 303 Cherry St., offers "Archaic Shapes/Natural Forms," an exhibition of mold-blown glass sculpture by Philadelphia artist Jon Clark, who for more than 20 years has directed the glass program at Temple University's Tyler School of Art; and "New Work," stained-glass panels by another Philadelphian, Judith Schaechter, a visiting lecturer at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and the University of the Arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1995 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
To mark its 80th anniversary, the Philadelphia Art Alliance has put together an exhibition that calls attention to the many eminent artists who have shown their work there since the institution was founded in 1915. Guest curator Patricia Stewart has compiled an impressive roster of artists, most of them associated with Philadelphia. The show and its small catalog break down the checklist by discipline, beginning with architecture and proceeding through book illustration and the various craft media to painting, sculpture, photography and prints.
NEWS
January 23, 1994 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Tim Wilson of Philadelphia professes to be "a very big" Charles Burns fan. That's why he was among those at the opening reception for "Pop Eyes," a fine-art cartoon exhibit at the Abington Art Center in Jenkintown on the afternoon of Jan. 15. Following the reception, Burns, a Philadelphia cartoonist and illustrator, spoke at a lecture attended by about 100 people. Rounding out the day's festivities was an evening "Eye Poppin' Party" attended by some of the 11 artists featured in the cartoon show.
NEWS
March 14, 1993 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The pluralism, or anarchy, of styles and methods that reigns over present- day art has encouraged a resurgence of dedicated, old-fashioned craftsmanship. In certain instances, the more individualistic the artist, the more interesting the results of his dedicated handcraft. This, I believe, is what the guest curator, silversmith Sharon Church, had in mind in selecting the name "Gothic Affinities: Five Contemporary Artists in the Craft Tradition" for an exhibit she organized at Bucks County Community College, where it is now on view.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1991 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Judith Schaechter's mordant, sometimes macabre representations in stained glass of the bad, the ugly and the distressing aspects of modern life are by now familiar. Thematically, her show of new work at Snyderman Gallery offers more of the same - terminal illness, poverty, unrequited love and consumer excess. Only a compulsive moralist could keep turning out work like this, but then in this society a moralist doesn't lack for subject matter. Yet I detect a little softening of attitude in this latest batch of work; at least it doesn't include anything really gruesome or disgusting.
1 | 2 | Next »
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