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Judy Garland

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1998 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Judy at the Stonewall Inn, at the Shubin Theatre, can be described by first explaining the words in the title. The Stonewall Inn was a gay club in Greenwich Village where, on Friday, June 27, 1969, during one of the periodic harassment raids conducted by the police, a riot ensued, sparking several days of sometimes violent protest by homosexuals. The Stonewall Riots are recognized as the beginning of the gay-rights movement, and June 27 has been enshrined, first as Christopher Street Liberation Day, then as Gay Pride Day. Judy is Judy Garland.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2003 | By Fred Beckley FOR THE INQUIRER
"Being an enthusiast," Erin McKeown said, "is almost like realizing you're a hedonist or an atheist. It's taken me a long time to understand that about myself and how I orient in life. I could be a Catholic, or I could be an enthusiast, and I'm an enthusiast. " Which explains why Judy Garland lies somewhere between leitmotiv and organizing principle on Grand (Nettwerk). "If I'm excited, I'm going to spend all my time on something, and Judy Garland totally fascinated me," McKeown said.
LIVING
December 10, 2000 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Get Happy, Gerald Clarke's probing biography of Judy Garland, clears the thickets of rumor that have sprouted over the legend's reputation since her death from barbiturate overdose in 1969. The result - as I said in my review of the book in April - is a story triumphal as it is tragic, revealing its subject as a singing shaman whose vibrato massaged listeners and cured everyone's afflictions but her own. Garland was rare among child stars in that her career survived her youth, and rarer among mature stars in that she so indelibly played characters at key developmental stages - the resourceful preteen Dorothy in The Wizard of Oz (1939)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2006 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
"Sit back. Relax. Here's Rufus. " And with those words, conductor Stephen Oremus began a rehearsal for one of the most curiously watched entertainment events of the summer. Pop star Rufus Wainwright is re-creating a legendary night in show business, Judy Garland's electric April 23, 1961 concert at Carnegie Hall, preserved on the Grammy-winning, best-selling Judy at Carnegie Hall. With a 40-piece band and Garland's orchestrations adapted to his voice, Wainwright will give sold-out performances Wednesday and Thursday at Carnegie Hall, staged and filmed by American Beauty director Sam Mendes and recorded by veteran producer Phil Ramone.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2000 | By David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Wanted: a new Judy Garland. Fans will be outraged. How could there be another? Besides, Garlandites have had a fabulous year. Get Happy, the definitive new biography by Gerald Clarke, has just come out. More lost footage from her best film, the 1954 A Star Is Born, has been found: yet another discarded version of her signature torch song, "The Man That Got Away. " Her 1963 CBS-TV series, long tied up in litigation, is finally being issued on DVD with lots of delicious outtakes.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1994 | By Ann Kolson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than two hours before show time, the work begins. Seated before a lighted mirror in a cramped dressing room at the Charles Playhouse here, wearing a bathrobe, head wrapped in a yellow towel, Jim Bailey begins to transform himself into Barbra Streisand. He is surrounded by pots of makeup, lip liners, eye pencils, a bottle of Miss Dior scent. There are stacks of Streisand tapes. A copy of the black, low-cut Empire gown, slit way up the front, that Streisand wears on her current concert tour hangs on a clothes rack.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2002 | By DAVID BLEILER & DAVID GORGOS For the Daily News
Judy Garland and James Dean remain two of the most enduring film legends from 20th-century pop culture. Both were enormously talented, both died tragically, and both spoke to a generation of fans with a distinct voice that is still felt today. They are also the subjects of two made-for-TV biographies with Golden Globe-winning lead performances. Based on daughter Lorna Luft's memoirs, "Life with Judy Garland: Me & My Shadows" (VHS: $14.99; DVD: $22.99) is a superlative look at the professional and private lives of one of the most beloved performers of stage and screen.
NEWS
May 24, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Rufus Wainwright is at a most delightfully odd point in his career. Nearly 20 years after an eponymous-titled debut album, the boyishly handsome, effortlessly dynamic vocalist and composer continues to set the bar for compelling cabaret/chamber pop the likes of which haven't been rendered so stirringly since Brian Wilson and Van Dyke Parks collaborated. While that may make mega-stardom impossible (he did try with 2012's Mark Ronson-produced Out of the Game ), it's also opened Wainwright's aesthetic floodgate to a variety of non-pop projects.
NEWS
July 2, 1991
GONE AND NOT FORGOTTEN People we'd like to see exhumed: Elvis - to end all those "sightings. " William Casey - to learn a few secrets. Albert Einstein - to pick his brain. John Dillinger - He was how big? Lee Oswald - Why not again? Let 'em rest in peace. F.D.R. - Zack Taylor, yes, but not our greatest president. W.C. Fields - on the whole, we'd rather he'd stay put. Judy Garland - A tragic life doesn't deserve another ignominy. Angelo Bruno - There are plenty of photos of his corpse already.
NEWS
May 10, 2000 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
The tornado that whisked Dorothy out of Kansas in the "Wizard of Oz" had nothing on that human tornado named Judy Garland who played her. Talk about a force to be reckoned with! More than 30 years after her death, Garland still fascinates. And in a new biography, "Get Happy" (Random House, $29.95), veteran journalist Gerald Clarke recaps her life in more incredible detail than has ever been told before. Garland was unusually gifted. She could sing. She could act. She could mesmerize an audience.
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NEWS
May 24, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Rufus Wainwright is at a most delightfully odd point in his career. Nearly 20 years after an eponymous-titled debut album, the boyishly handsome, effortlessly dynamic vocalist and composer continues to set the bar for compelling cabaret/chamber pop the likes of which haven't been rendered so stirringly since Brian Wilson and Van Dyke Parks collaborated. While that may make mega-stardom impossible (he did try with 2012's Mark Ronson-produced Out of the Game ), it's also opened Wainwright's aesthetic floodgate to a variety of non-pop projects.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
You have a choice: Catch Maurice Hines' song-and-dance Tappin' Thru Life at DTC or wait for NYC. Delaware Theatre Company's current production offers advantages. The house holds 315 in a space expansive enough to let the nine-piece Diva Jazz Orchestra soar, but still so intimate that Hines could shuffle down from the stage during an extended musical segment to shake hands with audience members. Hines' show pays tribute to his deceased brother Gregory and a host of performers who influenced the Hines brothers' careers.
NEWS
April 9, 2014 | By Carrie Rickey, For The Inquirer
Through almost a century, Mickey Rooney was a human whirlwind. At 6, he was the darling Mickey McGuire of movie silents; at 20, the prince of Hollywood; at 40, a has-been; at 55, the ultimate Broadway showman; and at 60, an Emmy-winning actor. Born Joseph Yule Jr. in 1920, he started working professionally at the age of 2 and never stopped. He appeared in films in every decade from the 1920s through the 2010s. Grandparents recall him as the jockey in National Velvet (1944); their grandchildren, as the trainer in The Black Stallion (1979)
NEWS
November 22, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
When Sophie Tucker called herself "the Last of the Red Hot Mamas," the plus-size ragtime café singer-turned-Ziegfeld Follies vaudevillian-turned radio and TV personality crafted an archetype, a sassy icon of traditional Yiddish song and bawdy comic tunes whose catalog was dwarfed only by her outsize personality. Tucker (1884-1966) was brassy, bodacious, loud and proud - Mae West and Fanny Brice rolled into one big lady. In her time she made hits of such songs as the slow, jazzy "Some of These Days," "Real Women Have Curves," and "Hula Lou," and in her wake she inspired the likes of Bette Midler.
NEWS
April 19, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
With his 40th birthday looming in July, Rufus Wainwright seems too provocative for middle age, but old enough to seize the opportunity for a concert that goes beyond typical song-based appearances. So, on Sunday at the Kimmel Center, Wainwright's contribution to the Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts will begin with a 45-minute version of his opera Prima Donna , followed by a large chunk of his Judy Garland at Carnegie Hall program, both with the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2012 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
She was sometimes shrill and her sparkly outfits were off-putting. Yet the screams of her devoted fans and the sight of those young girls in their Stetson-wearing glory made one thing clear (with apologies to Elvis Presley): 50 million pink-cowboy-hat-wearing Carrie Underwood fans can't be wrong. A near-capacity crowd of 19,500 of those fans jammed into the Wells Fargo Center on Wednesday night. The blonder-than-blond country girl with the cool, clean voice has come a long way since winning American Idol 's Season 4, a victory she acknowledged as her platform to fame.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2012 | By Howard Gensler
ELLEN DeGENERES was hailed as a trailblazer Monday night as she received the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor at the Kennedy Center, in Washington. The show will be broadcast Oct. 30 on PBS stations. When DeGeneres first heard that she was receiving the same honor that Bill Cosby , Tina Fey and Will Ferrell won in recent years, she joked, "It really makes me wonder . . . why didn't I get this sooner?" More than just 'Avatar' Deep-sea explorer James Cameron has come up from beneath the sea. The director of "Aliens," "Terminator 2," "Titanic" and "Avatar," has picked up movie rights to The Informationist , a novel by Taylor Stevens , whose main female character has been compared with Lisbeth Salander, "The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.
NEWS
April 2, 2012 | By Howard Shapiro, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Somewhere over the rainbow, Judy Garland never spotted her pot of gold. But a British actress named Tracie Bennett found hers - in the person of Judy. She is sensational in the erratic Broadway show End of the Rainbow, about Garland's last attempt at a comeback, which opened Monday night. If you're among Garland's legion of fans, you'll want to see Rainbow, but even if you're not, you'll want to see Bennett. Every minute she sings, Bennett channels Garland like a medium at a séance, and what would a Judy Garland impression be without the singing?
NEWS
October 23, 2011
Pop The London Studio Recordings 1957-1964 (First Hand, two CDs ***1/2) How do you get to Carnegie Hall? The answer for Judy Garland was no different than for anyone else: She practiced. Interestingly, her dry runs for her famous Carnegie Hall concert began in 1960 at a London recording studio, where she rerecorded her old repertoire - plus new stuff - in stereo. Having nearly died from hepatitis, Garland was in a new phase of her life in which she developed her one-woman-concert format in dates around Europe (Paris; Wiesbaden, Germany)
NEWS
June 10, 2009 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Adam Lambert: No surprise, I'm gay It took American Idol Season 2 runner-up Clay Aiken five years - five years of dodging reporters' questions, tabloid rumors and innuendos - to come out of the closet as a gay American man in September 2008. Adam Lambert, 27, on the other hand, has announced in the new issue of Rolling Stone mag that he is also a gay American man - barely five minutes after he was announced as the Season 8 runner-up. "I don't think it should be a surprise for anyone to hear I'm gay," Adam says.
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