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Juilliard Quartet

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1993 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
It was the Juilliard Quartet's turn, on Tuesday night, to try out the small new hall at the Convention Center. Before the music even began, it was a pleasure to stroll through the center's colorful corridors, meeting and greeting people in a lively promenade. The recital was part of the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society series, formerly held at the Port of History Museum's hall; that hall is unavailable because the building is under renovation. The program Tuesday was exemplary: Haydn's Quartet in F Major, Op. 50, No. 5; Andrew Imbrie's Fifth Quartet, and Schubert's incomparable Quartet in D Minor D. 810 ("Death and the Maiden")
NEWS
November 3, 1988 | By Andrew Stiller, Special to The Inquirer
The Juilliard String Quartet appeared under the auspices of the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society at the Port of History Museum last night. Highlighting a more-than-routine program was Leos Janacek's String Quartet No. 2 ("Intimate Letters"). Aside from Bartok's six, the great 20th-century quartets are far too seldom programmed; most listeners will know this one, if at all, as the (perfectly chosen) background music for the movie The Unbearable Lightness of Being. Like Alban Berg's Lyric Suite, composed about the same time, Janacek's quartet is a thinly disguised billet-doux to its composer's mistress.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1996 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Whether to leaven the austerity of the programs or to develop a new musical path, composers in growing numbers have added a voice to the string quartet. Richard Wernick has done it in his new Quartet No. 5, which premiered Wednesday at a single-performance concert by the Juilliard Quartet at the Convention Center. It's not a surprise to know that soprano Benita Valente sang the two lyrics by Hanna Senesh which open and close the four-movement work. Her accuracy, musicality and warm expressiveness are near-ideal components of music that is not song and accompaniment but is performed equally.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1998 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Changes within a string quartet, a granitic yet fragile social structure, are bound to catch the ear, and the audience Tuesday at the Convention Center seemed especially intent as it listened for the first time here to the newly reorganized Juilliard Quartet. With former second violinist Joel Smirnoff now the leader, and Ronald Copes newly seated as second violin, the ensemble has begun its second half-century with renewed flexibility, but without the riveting intensity that founding violinist Robert Mann had supplied.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1987 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
In 34 years of activity, Composers' Recordings Inc. (CRI) has issued more than 500 records of American music from this century. The CRI label's role in creating an archive is unique, and its growing catalogue still includes major works available on no other label. CRI has crossed a threshold this month by issuing its first compact disc recording (CRI 551), a performance by the Juilliard Quartet of Fred Lehrdahl's First String Quartet and Donald Martino's String Quartet (1983). The Martino piece consists of four movements played without pauses since elaborate cadenzas link each section.
NEWS
October 30, 2009 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
For decades, the Juilliard Quartet represented New York City-style chamber-music-making: streamlined and pared down to essentials, with searing intelligence and no obligation to tradition. Now, 63 years and nine personnel changes since its formation, it remains a force in American chamber music - particularly with the recent addition of Nick Eanet, former Metropolitan Opera concertmaster, who was heard locally for the first time at the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society concert Tuesday at the Kimmel Center.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, Music Critic
At 70 years old, the Juilliard String Quartet arrived Sunday afternoon sounding like a work in progress. Listeners had every right to feel wistful at the group's Philadelphia Chamber Music Society concert at the American Philosophical Society. Musicians are human, and all humans at some point begin to fail. This was Joel Krosnick's last appearance here as the group's cellist (Astrid Schween takes over in September), and a hearty standing ovation recognized his four-plus decades of providing a depth and complexity of sound that is rare in the field.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
One of the best parlor games in the city right now is connecting the dots among the various string quartets that come through under the aegis of the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society. Not long ago, the Juilliard Quartet spent a heavy evening with late Beethoven at the Independence Seaport Museum, sounding pleasantly old-world and in need of renovation - depending on the moment. The Brentano Quartet's Tuesday night concert at the Perelman Theater was the seventh string quartet appearance in the society's season lineup (10 quartets to go)
NEWS
November 17, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Is it reasonable to expect the Juilliard Quartet - after 65 years, nine personnel changes, and a constantly shifting zeitgeist - to play the kind of pathbreaking Bartok performances that made the group's reputation? And established the music itself as some of the century's best? Literally speaking, the answer is no. But Sunday's Philadelphia Chamber Music Society audience got the essence of Juilliard's importance in a Bartok String Quartet No. 5 performance that nearly eclipsed guest clarinetist Ricardo Morales in Brahms' Clarinet Quintet later in the program.
NEWS
October 30, 2009 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
For decades, the Juilliard Quartet represented New York City-style chamber-music-making: streamlined and pared down to essentials, with searing intelligence and no obligation to tradition. Now, 63 years and nine personnel changes since its formation, it remains a force in American chamber music - particularly with the recent addition of Nick Eanet, former Metropolitan Opera concertmaster, who was heard locally for the first time at the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society concert Tuesday at the Kimmel Center.
NEWS
February 22, 2006 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Now planning its 21st season, the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society announced this week its customary 63 concerts in nine venues, from the Kimmel Center's Perelman Theater to the Independence Seaport Museum, for its 2006-07 season. Many of the most notable events - Mitsuko Uchida playing the Schumann Piano Quintet (Op. 44) with the Brentano Quartet on Nov. 9 or the Juilliard Quartet revisiting Bartok repertoire it helped popularize 50 years ago, on March 13, 2007 - are programs being performed in other cities on tour.
NEWS
February 24, 2003 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The larger issues of life and death routinely hover around classical music, but rarely do they play out as uncomfortably close as they did Friday night when, just at curtain time for the Juilliard String Quartet concert, an audience member was stricken with a heart attack. The woman lay collapsed on the floor of the Perelman Theater for 35 minutes as various audience members, emergency workers, and Kimmel Center staff worked to revive her. The sold-out audience of about 650 had little choice but to sit and wait, hope for the best, and ponder what to do in a situation that Philadelphia Chamber Music Society staff members say was a first for the group.
NEWS
March 1, 2002 | By Daniel Webster FOR THE INQUIRER
Any composer who sets out to write a string quartet must make an accommodation with Beethoven. In 16 quartets, Beethoven ascended from virtuosity to eminence to transcendence. At the end, there seemed little room for improvement. Most composers make their Beethoven adjustments privately. But Ralph Shapey, the 81-year-old who has resisted easy accommodation to any form or dogma, is more public. The composer's Quartet No. 10 was played for the first time Wednesday by the Juilliard Quartet at the Kimmel Center's Perelman Theater, and he subtitled his three-movement work: "Ludwig and I. Es muss sein.
NEWS
March 23, 2001 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
However cool it is to be the first to hear chamber-music programs bound for glamorous venues in New York City, where they're more nervously performed, it's even better to hear a concert that happens only here. The Philadelphia Chamber Music Society presented precisely that with the Colorado Quartet on Wednesday. The quartet collaborated with half of the Guarneri Quartet (violist Michael Tree and cellist David Soyer) on Brahms' worthy but infrequently heard String Sextet No. 2 (Op. 36)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1998 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Elliott Carter wrote his own 90th birthday music, and has spent the days around his birthday soaking up honors and admiration at events in New York City. His new piano quintet had its premiere Dec. 4, and he looked down from a balcony box last Wednesday to applaud musicians who had organized a pre-birthday concert at Alice Tully Hall. Members of the New Juilliard Ensemble played Carter's Double Concerto in a program that included works by Carter favorites Igor Stravinsky and Pierre Boulez.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1998 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Elliott Carter's String Quartets sometimes seem the emblems of an age of alienation. The four players are asked to go separate ways, sometimes intersecting with each other but not often. On Thursday, the Juilliard Quartet played the latest Carter, the Quartet No. 5, written three years ago when the composer was 87. The Convention Center audience could hear that Carter has yielded a little. This piece, a series of six scenes in different moods, separated by interludes, has some of the Italian warmth Carter's titles and directions often predict, but less often fulfill.
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