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Jules Feiffer

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NEWS
March 8, 1988 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
There are these two old guys living in this cabin in the woods. One day there's a knock at the door. In walks Joan of Arc and - That's how Jules Feiffer's Knock, Knock, the current production at Bristol Riverside Theater, gets under way, and if it sounds like the beginning of a joke, that's OK, for Knock, Knock is little more than a joke told in three short acts. As playwright and a cartoonist, Feiffer is known as a socially and politically aware satirist. In this 1976 effort, however, he was simply out for laughs, and when the play is at its best he gets a good number of them.
NEWS
June 8, 1990 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
In Elliot Loves, playwright Jules Feiffer exercises his deceptively casual mastery over the tactical warfare that passes for love in our time. Directed slickly by Mike Nichols, the comedy that opened last night at Off- Broadway's Promenade Theater is less like a play than an encounter between the audience and the contemporary types that Feiffer continues to find so fascinating. This is an easier play than last fall's Anthony Rose, which Feiffer wrote for the Philadelphia Festival Theater for New Plays.
NEWS
October 23, 1989 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
Taken either as playwright or cartoonist, Jules Feiffer is an original. His work has in it a little of the madness he satirizes so entertainingly. His new play, Anthony Rose, isn't like Littler Murders or, my favorite, Knock Knock, or anything that anyone else has written either. It is its own creature and, I regret to say, at first viewing last night, it looks a little too tricky for its own good. The Philadelphia Festival Theater premiere was in the newly refurbished Harold Prince Theater of the Annenberg Center.
NEWS
March 8, 1989 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
Albert H. Gold, 67, a longtime lawyer remembered for his zestful spirit, died Sunday in Wayne, Maine, where he was overseeing construction of his vacation home. He had lived in West Mount Airy for more than 35 years. Mr. Gold started his legal career as a founding partner in Gold & Bowman, the Society Hill law firm to which he ultimately devoted more than four decades. Most recently he was serving as a managing partner and specializing in corporate and real estate law. Described as energetic and inquisitive, Mr. Gold was the sort who enjoyed a full life outside the office.
NEWS
May 2, 1990 | By Penny Jeannechild, Special to The Inquirer
Jules Feiffer knows that despite his 1986 Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning, the grown-ups don't take him seriously. "People still ask me what I really want to do. It's the cartoonist's curse, to be making a living giggling and doing something the grown-ups gave up in childhood," the 61-year-old Obie-winning playwright, cartoonist, screenwriter and novelist told his audience Saturday night. Feiffer's speech, "The Political Cartoonist and the Media," mixed personal anecdote, current events and satirical one-liners in an hourlong presentation that included 35 slides of his works.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1989 | By Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
The copiously talented Jules Feiffer (playwright, cartoonist, novelist, et al.) may have written his best play in "Anthony Rose" - and possibly his masterwork, if one can safely use such highborn terminology in the vernacular - which last night had its world premiere performance at the Harold Prince Theatre of the Annenberg Center. The play was expressly commissioned by the Philadelphia Festival Theatre for New Plays to open its ninth season, and Feiffer has served his patrons surpassing well.
NEWS
October 13, 1991 | By Victoria Donohoe, Inquirer Art Critic
Jules Feiffer, our nation's most versatile and unconventional pundit, launched his career by giving away cartoons to build a following. The Village Voice gladly received and began publishing these handouts regularly in 1956 when the Bronx-born Feiffer was 27. Suddenly the success of that new cartoon series, Feiffer, skyrocketed to mass circulation. His best-known comic strip, Feiffer is now syndicated in more than 100 newspapers worldwide, including The Inquirer. And for three decades now, he has been one of America's leading satirists.
NEWS
May 7, 1987 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Staff Writer
So long, Diane. You were some piece of work. Now, scram. Agitate the gravel. Hit the ground and run. Watch you don't let the doors of the bar hit you on the way out. Don't go away crying. Don't go away in a snit like you always do. Just go away. Right. I'm mean. I'm a bad guy. I giggle at others' tears. I blithely kick old ladies at street corners after they're convinced I'm going to help them across. When bullies gang up on the school sissy, I politely offer them tips on the most vulnerable parts of the anatomy and ask them where the nearest two-by-four is. Honest, kids, I don't enjoy thinking like this.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1987 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Staff Writer
So long, Diane. You were some piece of work. Now, scram. Agitate the gravel. Hit the ground and run. Watch you don't let the doors of the bar hit you on the way out. Don't go away crying. Don't go away in a snit like you always do. Just go away. Right. I'm mean. I'm a bad guy. I giggle at others' tears. I blithely kick old ladies at street corners after they're convinced I'm going to help them across. When bullies gang up on the school sissy, I politely offer them tips on the most vulnerable parts of the anatomy and ask them where the nearest two-by-four is. Honest, kids, I don't enjoy thinking like this.
NEWS
June 1, 1997 | By Ellen O'Brien, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Beetle your brow. The Feiffer is leaving the Voice. Jules Feiffer, the syndicated philosopher-cartoonist known as much for his articulate grousing as for his distinctive drawings, cut the cord to his hometown newspaper, the Village Voice, last week. Or was cut loose, depending on who's talking. Either way, New York City's cheeky weekly will no longer be running the 68-year-old Feiffer's half-page comic strip. It had been a fixture since October 1956. Voice publisher David Schneiderman blamed the breakup on money differences.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1998 | By Michael L. Rozansky, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Abandoned by his father, booted out of Columbia University, fired from a computer-programming job after being falsely accused of stealing the owner's bicycle, Ted Rall is one furious Generation Xer. Fortunately, he is armed with a pen - three Rapidograph pens, lying next to a half-finished cartoon on a drawing table in his two-bedroom co-op above Manhattan's Morningside Park. "Look at the world - how can you not be angry?" says Rall, sitting placidly on a living-room futon and stroking his orange cat, Indy.
NEWS
June 1, 1997 | By Ellen O'Brien, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Beetle your brow. The Feiffer is leaving the Voice. Jules Feiffer, the syndicated philosopher-cartoonist known as much for his articulate grousing as for his distinctive drawings, cut the cord to his hometown newspaper, the Village Voice, last week. Or was cut loose, depending on who's talking. Either way, New York City's cheeky weekly will no longer be running the 68-year-old Feiffer's half-page comic strip. It had been a fixture since October 1956. Voice publisher David Schneiderman blamed the breakup on money differences.
LIVING
May 30, 1997 | By W. Speers This article contains material from the Associated Press, New York Post, New York Daily News, New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times and USA Today
Jules Feiffer, whose satiric cartoons helped set the alternative tone for the Village Voice for 40 years, quit the Manhattan weekly Wednesday in a contract dispute. The paper, which paid him $75,000 a year, told the artist it wanted to discontinue the salary and buy his work from his syndicate for about $200 a week. Feiffer, 68, said Donald H. Forst, Voice editor since last fall, "told me in effect that he wanted to fire me but to continue to run me. " Negotiations collapsed Wednesday when Feiffer rejected a counterproposal for a $20,000-a-year staff position with benefits.
NEWS
October 13, 1991 | By Victoria Donohoe, Inquirer Art Critic
Jules Feiffer, our nation's most versatile and unconventional pundit, launched his career by giving away cartoons to build a following. The Village Voice gladly received and began publishing these handouts regularly in 1956 when the Bronx-born Feiffer was 27. Suddenly the success of that new cartoon series, Feiffer, skyrocketed to mass circulation. His best-known comic strip, Feiffer is now syndicated in more than 100 newspapers worldwide, including The Inquirer. And for three decades now, he has been one of America's leading satirists.
NEWS
June 8, 1990 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
In Elliot Loves, playwright Jules Feiffer exercises his deceptively casual mastery over the tactical warfare that passes for love in our time. Directed slickly by Mike Nichols, the comedy that opened last night at Off- Broadway's Promenade Theater is less like a play than an encounter between the audience and the contemporary types that Feiffer continues to find so fascinating. This is an easier play than last fall's Anthony Rose, which Feiffer wrote for the Philadelphia Festival Theater for New Plays.
NEWS
May 2, 1990 | By Penny Jeannechild, Special to The Inquirer
Jules Feiffer knows that despite his 1986 Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning, the grown-ups don't take him seriously. "People still ask me what I really want to do. It's the cartoonist's curse, to be making a living giggling and doing something the grown-ups gave up in childhood," the 61-year-old Obie-winning playwright, cartoonist, screenwriter and novelist told his audience Saturday night. Feiffer's speech, "The Political Cartoonist and the Media," mixed personal anecdote, current events and satirical one-liners in an hourlong presentation that included 35 slides of his works.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1989 | By Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
The copiously talented Jules Feiffer (playwright, cartoonist, novelist, et al.) may have written his best play in "Anthony Rose" - and possibly his masterwork, if one can safely use such highborn terminology in the vernacular - which last night had its world premiere performance at the Harold Prince Theatre of the Annenberg Center. The play was expressly commissioned by the Philadelphia Festival Theatre for New Plays to open its ninth season, and Feiffer has served his patrons surpassing well.
NEWS
October 23, 1989 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
Taken either as playwright or cartoonist, Jules Feiffer is an original. His work has in it a little of the madness he satirizes so entertainingly. His new play, Anthony Rose, isn't like Littler Murders or, my favorite, Knock Knock, or anything that anyone else has written either. It is its own creature and, I regret to say, at first viewing last night, it looks a little too tricky for its own good. The Philadelphia Festival Theater premiere was in the newly refurbished Harold Prince Theater of the Annenberg Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1989 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two years ago, Jules Feiffer was commuting between Houston and Evanston, Ill., to participate in productions of two plays he had written. The city he really wanted to be in - and, for a couple of months, didn't get to very often - was New York. "It was the longest period of time I had been away from my family, and the longest away from my little daughter," said the 60-year-old Feiffer, referring to Halley, the 4-year-old child of his second marriage. But as he has done for 35 years in the cartoons that have made him famous, Feiffer managed to turn this frustrating personal situation into artistic inspiration.
NEWS
March 8, 1989 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
Albert H. Gold, 67, a longtime lawyer remembered for his zestful spirit, died Sunday in Wayne, Maine, where he was overseeing construction of his vacation home. He had lived in West Mount Airy for more than 35 years. Mr. Gold started his legal career as a founding partner in Gold & Bowman, the Society Hill law firm to which he ultimately devoted more than four decades. Most recently he was serving as a managing partner and specializing in corporate and real estate law. Described as energetic and inquisitive, Mr. Gold was the sort who enjoyed a full life outside the office.
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