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Julia Child

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NEWS
August 20, 2002 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Julia Child's kitchen opened at the Smithsonian Institution yesterday, right down to the plastic-veggie refrigerator magnets and her beloved "fright knife" from her former home in Cambridge, Mass. A self-proclaimed "knife freak," Child covered almost every bare wall with knives of every shape - implements both strange and familiar. Child, 90, venerable star of TV cooking shows and author of the best-selling Mastering the Art of French Cooking, designed the kitchen with help from her husband, the late Paul Child, when they moved into the home in 1961.
NEWS
August 15, 2004 | Lari Robling
Lari Robling is a regular commentator on WHYY-FM's A Chef's Table, heard Saturdays at noon In tribute to her passing Friday, I'm certain dinner tables across the country tonight will feature favorite dishes from well-worn copies of The French Chef Cookbook by Julia Child. This was the companion book to her public-television series that brought cooking out of kitchen drudgery and into our consciousness as entertainment - even if we didn't know a soupcon from a saucepan. Wolfgang Puck, Emeril, even Martha Stewart owes Julia Child for looking into that camera, butcher knife in hand, and carving out the world of celebrity chefs.
NEWS
March 26, 1990 | By Mark Jaffe, Inquirer Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this report
President Bush has thrown down the gauntlet or, more accurately, the broccoli, and master chef Julia Child has picked it up. The President says he doesn't like the green veggie. Child says that if White House chefs cut it, blanch it, then saute it in olive oil and garlic, the leader of the Western world will devour it. "President Bush would love to eat broccoli if it was prepared in this way," Child insisted during an interview here, where she was participating in the Book and the Cook festival that ended yesterday.
NEWS
August 15, 1997
Most of us don't go home after a hard day's work and bone a duck for dinner. Or prepare a creme bruleed chocolate Bundt cake for dessert. Or know just when to open the oven for a flawless souffle. But that doesn't mean we don't owe a hearty debt to Julia Child. America's grande dame of cooking turns 85 years old today, and that is cause for celebration even if Lamb Stew Printanierre (one of her favorite dishes) has never, ever graced your kitchen table. Julia Child has done more than pen famous cookbooks, appear in countless television shows and lead an industry with her passion for French cooking and baking.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2012 | Bonnie S. Benwick, Washington Post
It was a party they didn't want to miss, and a deadline they had to make: Aug. 15, on what would have been Julia Child's 100th birthday. The very Smithsonian curators who had negotiated with the 89-year-old icon in her Cambridge, Mass., kitchen in 2001, catalogued the room's contents, packed them up, and created one of the National Museum of American History's most beloved exhibits, only to disassemble it a decade later for the sake of infrastructure improvement,...
NEWS
August 14, 2004 | By Craig LaBan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Julia Child, the gangly grande dame of French cooking in America who demystified the joys of quiche and duck a l'orange for generations of home cooks through her books and pioneering television shows, died in her sleep early yesterday in Montecito, Calif. She was two days shy of her 92d birthday. The unmistakable hoot of her voice, her disarming sense of humor, and her notorious butterfingers in the kitchen made Child an endearing national icon, coaxing millions of food-lovers to the stove with the assurance that if she could do it, so could they.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2008 | By APRIL LISANTE, For the Daily News
SHE WAS brining, roasting, kneading and sautéing when Emeril Lagasse was in diapers, and Rachael Ray wasn't even a gleam in her parents' eyes. At a time when cooking wasn't cool - and certainly not on television - Julia Child single-handedly pioneered a new gastronomic course for the world. But the familiar, larger-than-life persona of her celebrity years had humble beginnings as a shy, awkward, sometimes inept culinary student. Though she is known mostly for the television fame she gained late in life, her love affair with French cooking began as a lark, a thirtysomething's determination to learn a few dishes to please her new husband.
FOOD
September 14, 1994 | By Cynthia Nims, FOR THE INQUIRER
It was 8:30 in the morning as I walked through the already brisk New England chill, past the picket fence and fire-engine-red Volvo to the door of Julia Child's home in Cambridge, Mass. Clutching a small ice chest filled with sweet Olympia oysters and first-of-the-season Dungeness crabs under one arm and a note pad under the other, I rang the doorbell. Warming up in her cozy big kitchen a few minutes later, I watched as Julia Child pulled a small knife from a drawer, opened an Olympia and slurped it down with great enthusiasm.
FOOD
August 13, 1997 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Happy birthday, Julia Child. The food world's first lady turns 85 on Friday. And to mark the occasion, fans and foodies everywhere are participating in a worldwide birthday celebration initiated by the International Association of Cooking Professionals. There's an open invitation to some of the parties, one there's still time to accept. The price of each event includes a $25 tax-deductible donation to the culinary scholarship fund that bears Child's name. Local parties include a four-course gourmet dinner of Child's recipes Friday at The Restaurant School, 4207 Walnut St. The $65 dinner, with seatings at 6 and 8:30 p.m., will be hosted by Esther Press, a featured chef in Baking With Julia.
FOOD
October 6, 2005 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Julie Powell proved you can be completely original by following in someone else's footsteps. In August 2002, Powell was approaching 30 with fear and loathing: She'd learned she might never bear children; her dream of an acting career had deflated; and she was spending her days as a temp, commuting from Queens to a dead-end secretarial? gig. "A temp!" she rails even now, recalling how the limitations of the position pounded against her unexplored potential. She was not even a bona fide, if underappreciated, employee.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 5, 2015
Chef Julia Michael Klein's coverage of the Fountain restaurant's closing noted Julia Child's visit during the 1990 Book and the Cook tour, and that she had a warm, gracious greeting and handshake for all ("Esteemed Fountain's last call," Dec. 25). My late husband and I had the opportunity to attend the April 1990 luncheon with Child at the Fountain. We spoke, she was indeed warm and gracious, and it was a pleasure to meet her after watching her show on television. |Marilyn D. Harris, Warminster Let the sun shine in With talk of ramping up the city as a fossil-fuel energy hub, residents now have a critical opportunity to choose the type of energy future they want for Philadelphia.
FOOD
June 13, 2013 | By J. Bryan Lowder, SLATE
Bonjour, mes petits lecteurs! Let's make a pact up front: If I resist the urge to make a preening bon mot about Proust in this prologue, you have to promise not to gripe about how this recipe, without exception, requires the purchase of a special pan. (A mini-muffin tin might produce something, but they will not be madeleines.) Deal? Magnifique! With that out of the way, we can move on to just why delicate, fragrant, consummately charming madeleines should become part of your baking repertoire.
NEWS
June 7, 2013
Here are a few of the roses Bill Kozemchak recommended during a walkabout of his garden: Prolific bloomers: Julia Child (floribunda) and Fourth of July (climber). White roses: Sally Holmes (climber); Pillow Fight (shrub), which Kozemchak thinks grows better than Iceberg, a white standard; and floribundas Fabulous and Moondance. Black spot resistant: Cherry Parfait (grandiflora); Heart 'N' Soul (shrub); Pretty Lady (floribunda). Fragrant: Hybrid teas Double Delight, Pope John Paul, Neptune, Secret; Ambridge (shrub)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2012 | Bonnie S. Benwick, Washington Post
It was a party they didn't want to miss, and a deadline they had to make: Aug. 15, on what would have been Julia Child's 100th birthday. The very Smithsonian curators who had negotiated with the 89-year-old icon in her Cambridge, Mass., kitchen in 2001, catalogued the room's contents, packed them up, and created one of the National Museum of American History's most beloved exhibits, only to disassemble it a decade later for the sake of infrastructure improvement,...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2009 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Meryl Streep is saucy as Julia Child in Julie & Julia , an irresistible account of the American who taught her countrywomen to cook a la Française . And, who 40 years later, inspired the foundering Julie Powell (Amy Adams, at her most winsome) to find her moorings by cooking all 524 recipes in Mastering the Art of French Cooking - and blogging about it. Like Nora Ephron's captivating film, Streep's performance is haute cuisine disguised as comfort food, a complex preparation yielding effects both broadly entertaining and subtly moving.
NEWS
August 6, 2009 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com
The bad marriage is such a staple of the modern movie that it has become a bit of a bore. Watching Kate Winslet and Leonardo DiCaprio go at it in "Revolutionary Road" made me wish, for the first time, that I was watching "Titanic" again. Maybe that's why there's something almost subversive about Nora Ephron's "Julie & Julia," a smiley-face version of the "The Hours" that substitutes Julia Child for Virginia Woolf, food for suicide, jokes for despair, and startles us with its refreshing portrait of a good marriage.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2008 | By APRIL LISANTE, For the Daily News
SHE WAS brining, roasting, kneading and sautéing when Emeril Lagasse was in diapers, and Rachael Ray wasn't even a gleam in her parents' eyes. At a time when cooking wasn't cool - and certainly not on television - Julia Child single-handedly pioneered a new gastronomic course for the world. But the familiar, larger-than-life persona of her celebrity years had humble beginnings as a shy, awkward, sometimes inept culinary student. Though she is known mostly for the television fame she gained late in life, her love affair with French cooking began as a lark, a thirtysomething's determination to learn a few dishes to please her new husband.
FOOD
October 6, 2005 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Julie Powell proved you can be completely original by following in someone else's footsteps. In August 2002, Powell was approaching 30 with fear and loathing: She'd learned she might never bear children; her dream of an acting career had deflated; and she was spending her days as a temp, commuting from Queens to a dead-end secretarial? gig. "A temp!" she rails even now, recalling how the limitations of the position pounded against her unexplored potential. She was not even a bona fide, if underappreciated, employee.
FOOD
September 30, 2004 | By Eils Lotozo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For most performers, preparing for the opening of a show means running through lines and fine-tuning songs. But for Jilline Ringle, getting ready for a run of her cabaret act Mondo Mangia requires a shopping trip to pick up 50 pounds of onions and a case of plum tomatoes. That's because Ringle not only sings food-themed songs and tells stories about her family's Italian matriarchs during her one-woman show. She also cooks a pasta dish onstage and feeds the entire audience. Ringle, who opened a monthlong run of Mondo Mangia last night at the Walnut Street Theatre, premiered her unusual culinary cabaret here four years ago with 1812 Productions.
NEWS
August 15, 2004 | Lari Robling
Lari Robling is a regular commentator on WHYY-FM's A Chef's Table, heard Saturdays at noon In tribute to her passing Friday, I'm certain dinner tables across the country tonight will feature favorite dishes from well-worn copies of The French Chef Cookbook by Julia Child. This was the companion book to her public-television series that brought cooking out of kitchen drudgery and into our consciousness as entertainment - even if we didn't know a soupcon from a saucepan. Wolfgang Puck, Emeril, even Martha Stewart owes Julia Child for looking into that camera, butcher knife in hand, and carving out the world of celebrity chefs.
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